Tag Archives | New Zealand

Mother Convicted Of Giving Baby Marijuana Through Breast Milk

Guilty of raising one cool baby. The New Zealand Herald reports:

A woman has been convicted of giving cannabis to her 3-month old baby through her breast milk, in what is believed to be the first case of its kind in New Zealand. The 29-year-old Wanganui woman was charged with administering a class C controlled drug, namely cannabis, to a person under the age of 18.

The charges were laid after a police search of a house for drugs. The woman’s partner also faced charges over the drug raid. Acting Senior Sergeant Andrew McDonald said the woman’s actions amounted to child abuse.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

New Zealand Grants Personhood Rights To River

In my eyes, this makes more sense than the Citizens United ruling. Via Care2:

In a landmark case for the Rights of Nature, officials in New Zealand recently granted the Whanganui, the nation’s third-longest river, with legal personhood “in the same way a company is, which will give it rights and interests”. The decision follows a long court battle for the river’s personhood initiated by the Whanganui River iwi, an indigenous community with strong cultural ties to the waterway.

Under the settlement, the river is regarded as a protected entity, under an arrangement in which representatives from both the iwi and the national government will serve as legal custodians towards the Whanganui’s best interests.

While it may seem an odd extension of rights, in many ways it harkens back to a time when mankind’s fate was more readily acknowledged as being intertwined with that of the rivers, lakes, and streams that sustained us.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Inventor Suffocated To Death By Helmet For Remotely Controlling Devices

Is the gruesome death of this amateur inventor a metaphor for our relationship to the technology that has pervaded our everyday lives? Reported by New Zealand’s Stuff:

Police have confirmed the death of a man found in South Auckland on Monday was accidental, and it is understood it was the result of home experiment which went wrong. Michael William Roiall, 34, was found dead at his Papatoetoe home about 2.30pm.

It’s understood the man was an amateur inventor and was found wearing a home-made helmet, which he was attempting to use to control devices in his home. It’s believed the helmet may have suffocated him.

A neighbour, who did not want to be named, said the area was normally very quiet. However, she said there had been an unusually high number of police officers patrolling the street in the past few weeks. “It’s all been a bit weird,” she said.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

World’s Biggest Insect Found In New Zealand

No word on whether it is available for adoption. Via the Daily Mail:

Mark Moffett’s find is the world’s biggest insect in terms of weight, which at 71g is heavier than a sparrow and three times that of a mouse. The 53-year-old former park ranger discovered the giant weta up a tree and [it] has now been declared the largest ever found. The creepy crawly is only found on Little Barrier Island, in New Zealand, although there are 70 other types of smaller weta found throughout the country.


Read the rest

Continue Reading

Lucifer Banned In New Zealand

Devil2Yup, that’s right, you can’t name your child (or yourself, presumably) “Lucifer” in New Zealand, per this report in the Sydney Morning Herald:

Naming your new bundle of joy Lucifer has been effectively banned by New Zealand’s names registrar after three parents had the odd request knocked back.

The country’s Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages has been cracking down on mothers and fathers getting too creative with their children’s names, ruling out punctuation marks such as . (Full Stop), * (Asterisk) and / (presumably ”Slash”).

The list of 102 names rejected in the past two years includes Baron, Bishop, Duke, General, Judge, Justice, King, Knight and Mr, all deemed too similar to titles.

Messiah was also turned down, as was 89, and the single letters, C, D, I and T, although Q and J were accepted after being queried.

It’s a new hard line for the agency that made headlines in 2008 when it was revealed to have approved a series of strange monikers, among them Benson and Hedges, twins named after the cigarette brand, and Violence and Number 16 Bus Shelter, both for boys…

[continues in the Sydney Morning Herald]

Read the rest

Continue Reading

New Zealand Truck Driver Nearly Pops After Getting Air Hose Lodged In …

Photo: Andrew Magill (CC)

Photo: Andrew Magill (CC)

Michael Sheridan writes in the NY Daily News:

A truck driver in New Zealand nearly popped after an air hose accidently got lodged in his buttocks.

Steven McCormack says he is “lucky to be alive” after the bizarre accident on Saturday landed him in intensive care at a hospital in Whakatane, on the North Island’s east coast.

“I felt the air rush into my body and I felt like I was going to explode,” he told 3News in New Zealand on Tuesday.

The 48-year-old was at Waiotahi Contractors where he worked, standing on the rigging between his truck and the trailer when he slipped and fell.

He landed on the hose connected to the semi’s airbrakes and broke it. The nozzle pierced his left buttocks and air from the tanks pumped into his body at 100 pounds per square inch.

“I was blowing up like a football,” he said.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

New Zealand’s Lost ‘Eighth Wonder Of The World’ Found Deep Underwater

110203124824-largeKiwi scientists have discovered portions of the Pink and White Terraces, a natural wonder which was ravaged by a 19th century volcanic blast. Sadly, the remnants are buried at the bottom of a lake, meaning they will remain hidden away from the eyes of humans. Science Daily reveals:

They were called the Eighth Wonder of the World. Until the late 19th century, New Zealand’s Pink and White Terraces along Lake Rotomahana on the North Island, attracted tourists from around the world, interested in seeing the beautiful natural formations created by a large geothermal system. But the eruption of Mt. Tarawera on June 10, 1886, buried the terraces in sediment and caused the lake basin to enlarge, engulfing the land where the terraces stood. For more than a century, people have speculated whether any part of the Pink and White Terraces survived the eruption.

This week, scientists from New Zealand’s GNS Science, in collaboration with engineers and scientists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and colleagues from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and NOAA-PMEL, located portions of the long-lost Pink Terraces.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Alien with Size 440 Shoe Among New Zealand’s Recently Declassified UFO Sightings

New Zealand AlienNew Zealand’s military has made public hundreds of documents dating back to 1954 of UFOs, include drawings of flying saucers and alleged samples of alien writing. My favorite so far has been reported in the Telegraph:

A man who in 1995 met the giant alien with size 440 shoes says the being told him that on dying humans ascend as hydrogen atoms. “You will remain in hydrogen form for 150 years. Then it will change to sodium.”

Looking forward to my post-death atomic experience. Turning into hydrogen sounds pretty cool but I don’t know how I feel about sodium.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Explosion Traps Dozens Of New Zealand Miners

Again? Hopefully this time the miners won’t have to wait 2 months to see sunlight again. The New York Times reports:

At least two dozen men were trapped underground after an explosion on Friday rocked the country’s largest coal mine in a mountainous region in the country’s South Island.

Authorities said it was too early to determine a cause of the explosion, and said no deaths had been reported from the accident. Local media reported two people had been pulled safely from the collapsed mine, located near the town of Atarau near the west coast of the South Island.

Earlier in the day Pike River Coal, the company operating the mine, said 27 people were in the mine, but it was not clear whether the two men who had emerged were included in that figure. The New Zealand National Police was unable to confirm the exact number missing.

Rescue teams were assessing the safety of the mine before beginning their descent, trying to make sure vents were clear and that gas would not build up in the mine, local media reported.

Read the rest
Continue Reading