Tag Archives | News

Texas woman claims Bigfoot just had a baby

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

The woman from Texas, Brenda, claims (via Cryptozoology News):

“We didn’t know what was going on until just a few years ago. At first, we found the house that they were living in. My husband and I didn’t know what it was, and he kind of joked at me about it… at that time we didn’t realize it was a Bigfoot. Since then, our property had a fire, it burned down, so we moved a mile and a half from where we knew they were into another house. Little did we know that we were just coming into a family of them,” she told Coast to Coast guest host Dave Schrader late Friday in an open-line phone call made to the nightly radio show.

“They throw rocks on the house, I hear them talking. People thought I was crazy, but I know what I heard.

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[Poll] What are your favorite sites?

Dennis Skley (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Dennis Skley (CC BY-ND 2.0)

We’re going to be running a different kind of poll this week. Instead of having us choose the choices, you’ll be able to input your own. Unfortunately, the plugin we use for the polls does not allow write ins. So, we’ll have to resort to a Google Form. With that being said, we want to see which websites are most popular with the Disinfo crowd. The sites can be any kind: Reddit, Twitter, Boing Boing, Politico, Vice, AlterNet, Scientific American, etc. Ideally, we’d like to see where everyone gets their news, but feel free to include others.

Also, the results for “Favorite Occultist” are in. I consulted Thad McKraken to help me compile the list as I’m not well versed in the Occult.

Aleister Crowley 188
Alan Moore 81
Grant Morrison 79
Austin Osman Spare 47
Madame Blavatsky 41
Jack Parsons 38
Thad McKraken 35
Kenneth Grant 10
Marjorie Cameron 2
Please vote here for your favorite websites.… Read the rest
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Lee Camp: Using Comedy to Uncover the Truth

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Un-Redacted: Activist comedian Lee Camp and his news show, Redacted Tonight use comedy to uncover the truth by covering all the stories you won’t see in either comedy or on the news.

How do you make School of the Americas, climate change, the military and prison industrial complexes, corporate personhood and income inequality funny? And perhaps more importantly, why should they be made funny?

Lee Camp, activist comedian and ‘intrepid newshound’ host of the news comedy show, Redacted Tonight, explains.

“A lot of these issues I try to tackle are simply too depressing when tackled straight on. People avoid them or look the other way,” he says.

“But with comedy, people will listen longer, they’ll forward it to friends, they’ll not feel completely defeated by everything we’re facing. Even people that disagree with me are willing to watch a comedy show.”

Art killing apathy, as it were; engagement through entertainment.… Read the rest

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DatC #050 – Hillfolk’s Hoodoo With Byron Ballard

Down at the Crossroads #050 – Hillfolk’s Hoodoo with Byron Ballard

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050_byron_ballardHello and thank you once again for joining me down at the crossroads for some music, magick, and Paganism. Where witches gather for the sabbath, offerings are made, pacts are signed for musical fame and we cross paths with today’s most influential Pagans, occultists, and deep thinkers. I am your bewitching, bald headed host Chris Orapello and tonight, we travel to the land of fae once again to attend FaerieCon East 2014 where I had the pleasure of meeting and interviewing beloved Appalachian Folk Magic practitioner and author Byron Ballard. Byron and I had a fun discussion about her book Staubs and Ditchwater: A Friendly and Useful Introduction to Hillfolk’s Hoodoo as well as talk about her background, experiences, and thoughts in regards to practicing witchcraft and the art and drama of religious ritual in Paganism today.Read the rest

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The Myth of the Megalith

Eusebius@Commons (CC BY 2.0)

Eusebius@Commons (CC BY 2.0)

via The New Yorker:

Baalbek, Lebanon, is the site of one of the most mysterious ruins of the Roman Empire, a monumental two-thousand-year-old temple to Jupiter that sits atop three thousand-ton stone blocks. (The pillars of Stonehenge weigh about a fortieth of that.) The blocks originated in a nearby limestone quarry, where a team from the German Archaeological Institute, in partnership with Jeanine Abdul Massih, of Lebanese University, recently discovered what they are calling the largest stone block from antiquity, weighing one thousand six hundred and fifty tons and matching those that support the temple. Its provenance is more shadowy than one might expect of a three-million-pound megalith. Nobody seems to know on whose orders it was cut, or why, or how it came to be abandoned.

Baalbek is named for Baal, the Phoenician deity, although the Romans knew the site by its Greek name, Heliopolis.

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Researchers use real data rather than theory to measure the cosmos

Incase (CC BY 2.0)

Incase (CC BY 2.0)

via Phys.org:

For the first time researchers have measured large distances in the Universe using data, rather than calculations related to general relativity.

A research team from Imperial College London and the University of Barcelona has used data from astronomical surveys to measure a standard distance that is central to our understanding of the expansion of the .

Previously the size of this ‘standard ruler’ has only been predicted from theoretical models that rely on general relativity to explain gravity at large scales. The new study is the first to measure it using observed data. A standard ruler is an object which consistently has the same physical size so that a comparison of its actual size to its size in the sky will provide a measurement of its distance to earth.

“Our research suggests that current methods for measuring distance in the Universe are more complicated than they need to be,” said Professor Alan Heavens from the Department of Physics, Imperial College London who led the study.

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I Told a Grand Jury I Saw a Cop Shoot and Kill an Unarmed Man. It Didn’t Indict.

Elvert Barnes (CC BY 2.0)

Elvert Barnes (CC BY 2.0)

via Mother Jones:

Many years ago, during the 1980s, I witnessed a killing: a New York City cop shooting an unarmed homeless man near the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I was later called as a grand jury witness in the case. The grand jury did not indict the officer.

It was a summer evening. I was heading to play softball in Central Park. At the corner of Fifth Avenue and 79th Street, I got off my bicycle to walk toward the Great Lawn. The west side of Fifth was crowded with New Yorkers enjoying the beautiful night. People were streaming in and out of the park. Sidewalk vendors were doing brisk business. The vibe was good. And in the midst of the hubbub, I spotted a fellow wearing dirty and tattered clothing. His hair was filthy, his face worn. It was hard to determine his age.

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New Grimm Bros’ Tales Translation, ESA’s Comet Landing, Dr. Oz Backlash

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Podcast from the Indie Bohemians Morning Show: One of the few truly independent Morning Shows left on the airwaves, Nashville-based Indie Bohemians is a morning show for people who hate morning shows!

Jam packed show today folks! Rob Haynes checks in with a Sports Report, will Vegas be getting an NHL Team? Angie Dorin gives us a Monkey Minute and Eddie Clark updates us on NASCAR. In Pop Culture, a Professor of German Literature has compiled a new translation of the Grimm Brothers’ Fairytales, and we take a look at Dr. Oz’s Twitter backlash, is his programming irresponsible? Finally, gotta address the Philae, landing on a comet 310 million miles from Earth!

 

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Pursuing Justice Through Filmmaking, Why we Create Beauty, Hot Dog Related Altercations

Via Midwest Real

Filmmakers Spencer Chumbley and Erik Ljung have shot for organizations like VICE and Al Jazeera. I caught up with the guys just before they debuted their film, The Death of Cory Stingley a the Milwaukee Film Festival. 

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Humans make things, we always have. But, we don’t just make, we create beauty. We pay attention to symmetry, form and detail. Why is that? Darwinian theory says it’s simply a form of “peacocking.” More specifically, our creative predispositions are merely “fitness signals.” For example, if you write a novel, create a moving peace of art, or compose a great song, it’s just a uniquely human way of showing off your intellect in hopes of attracting a mate, like a peacock with it’s innately douchey bouquet of feathers.

I fucking hate this idea.  

But, let’s be fair. It’s totally undeniable that ego and social elevation are often intertwined with creative accomplishments.Read the rest

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Entheodelic Storytelling: A Conversation with Gabriel D. Roberts

Quest For GnosisPAPERI recently had the distinct pleasure of catching up with my good friend Gabriel D. Roberts, author of The Quest for Gnosis. He is making his first foray into fiction very soon with a new book called The Hermit.

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BR: Gabe, one of the things I like so much about the way you deliver ideas is that it is both honest and raw while also “getting to the heart of things” in a very rapid manner. What were some of the initial things that inspired The Quest for Gnosis?

I wanted to make a fast track for the serious seeker who was tired of the dogmatic mire of big religion and I knew that I alone would fall short of delivering such a tome. It made sense to employ the minds of those very people who shaped and influenced my perspectives. This is a refinement of my own journey that I hope will make it easier for the neophyte to grow.… Read the rest

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