Tag Archives | Norway

The Diary of a Self-Hating Meat Eater

Roland Tanglao (CC BY 2.0)

Roland Tanglao (CC BY 2.0)

via The Awl:

Author’s Note: The following are excerpts from a diary that I found in the pocket of a black trench coat at a thrift store in Oslo, Norway. I have translated the diary from the original Norwegian (Bokmål). For the sake of the diarist’s privacy, I shall not provide his name. I shall, however, note that the diary contains a few visible food stains, and that here and there the diarist has illustrated the foods responsible for these stains. Also I shall note that the diary smells repulsive. It smells like my dad’s socks.

November 2,

The hollowness has returned. Ulrikke has left me. Grier’s visiting his girlfriend whom I’m sure is not real in Brussels, so now I have the apartment to myself. Today the sun set at 4 and it won’t rise until 8 in the morning. I feel like a submarine at the abysmal bottom of the sea.

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Coincidence Control Network: Episode 54

Coincidence Control Network: File #054 – Attack of the Modern Caveman

ccnimage54

This week: Pussy Riot update, the slow television of Norway, Detroit bark city?, Matt Forney is a massive dick-bag, Dark Wallet and BitCoin: a good idea?, and a Canadian Astronaut snorts at Hollywood.

PersonnelJoe Nolan, Kim Monaghan, and Ken Eakins

[powerpress]

Links:

  • Pussy Riot Hunger Strike – Link
  • Norway does TV…wrong – Link
  • Investor to Create a Forest in Detroit – Link
  • Matt Forney – Modern Caveman – Link
  • Dark wallet – Link
  • Canadian Astronaut booted out of screening of Gravity for heckling – Link

Interludes:

Dissolved, End, Messer Chups

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Norwegian Scientists Say LSD Might Be Good for Some

At the very least, it doesn’t no harm to one’s mental health according to the scientists:

Via The Local:

“There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, or use of LSD in the past year, and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes,” Pål-Ørjan Johansen and Teri Krebs from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim concluded in their study published in the PLOS One journal on Tuesday.
“Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with a lower rate of mental health problems.”
For the study, the researchers analyzed data on the more than 130,000 Americans who took drug use surveys between 2001 and 2004, of which 22,000 had used a psychedelic drug at least once.
“Despite popular perceptions, expert harm assessments have not demonstrated that classical serotonergic psychedelic substances such as LSD, psilocybin, and mescaline are demonstrated to cause chronic mental health problems,” Johansen told The Local.
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Mass Murderer Trained With ‘Call Of Duty’

Here’s some fuel for the debate over the potential harm of allowing children (and presumably unstable adults) to play extremely realistic first-person shooter games, via the Guardian:

Call of Duty Black Ops Logotipo-2011-28-08

Anders Behring Breivik has described how he “trained” for the attacks he carried out in Norway last summer using the computer game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.

The 33-year-old said he practised his shot using a “holographic aiming device” he had bought to use with the war simulation game, which he said is used by armies around the world for training.

“You develop target acquisition,” he said. He used a similar device during the shooting attacks that left 69 dead at a political youth camp on the island of Utøya on 22 July.

Describing the game, he said: “It consists of many hundreds of different tasks and some of these tasks can be compared with an attack, for real. That’s why it’s used by many armies throughout the world.

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Norway’s Home-Grown Terrorist Claims Self-Defence

BreivikI think Anders may need better legal counsel as I can’t imagine any judge or jury on Earth buying self-defence as justification for his mass of murders. Via the Guardian:

In an average year, 30 murders are committed in Norway. In three hours one afternoon in July last year, Anders Behring Breivik more than doubled that figure. Yet when he appeared at the first day of his trial on Monday, the 33-year-old insisted he was not guilty of acts of terrorism resulting in the deaths of 77 people.

“I acknowledge the acts,” Breivik told Oslo central court when asked to enter a plea. “But I do not plead guilty and I claim that I was doing it in self defence.”

His lawyer had already warned that this would be how Breivik would justify planting an enormous bomb outside the government quarters in Oslo, killing eight people, before heading to the island of Utøya to gun down 69 more attending a summer camp of the ruling Labour party.

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In Norway’s Hills, Anyone Can Be The Voice Of God

It seems like a very egalitarian, Scandinavian approach to divine pronouncements. No matter whom you are, you may dial the number and hear your voice echo across the land. Via Unsworn Industries:

Telemegaphone Dale stands seven metres tall on top of the Jøtulshaugen mountain overlooking the idyllic Dalsfjord in Western Norway. When you dial the Telemegaphone’s phone number the sound of your voice is projected out across the fjord, the valley and the village of Dale below.

mountain

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Bastoy: Norway’s Island Of Freedom For Prisoners

bastoey-prision_noruegaDer Spiegel takes a look at the resort-like island that houses some of Norway’s most hardened convicts — they are given a wide berth to do as they please, but must complete their work and behave civilly, or risk being shipped back to regular prison. Is this how criminal rehabilitation could be done here?

No bars. No walls. No armed guards. The prison island of Bastøy in Norway is filled with some of the country’s most hardened criminals. Yet it emphasizes self-control instead of the strictly regulated regimens common in most prisons. For some inmates, it is more than they can handle.

The warden is a man who deals in freedom. He is also a visionary. He wants the men here to live as if they were living in a village, to grow potatoes and compost their garbage, and he wants the guards and the prisoners to respect each other. What he doesn’t want is a camera in the supermarket.

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Norway’s Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet Fad Has Caused a Butter Shortage

ButterNick Carbone writes in TIME:

Denmark is trying to wean its people off butter by imposing a hefty “fat tax,” but their neighbors across the Skagerrak in Norway can’t get enough of the golden goodness. A diet fad in the Scandinavian country has depleted the nation’s supply of butter. While we’d use the term “diet” lightly, the newest craze is a low-carb, high-fat feeding frenzy that has put a strain on Norway’s butter supply.

“Sales all of a sudden just soared,” Lars Galtung, head of communications at TINE, the country’s biggest farmer-owned cooperative, told Reuters. “Twenty percent in October then thirty percent in November.” The fat fad coupled with a summer that saw a major reduction in milk production spells empty supermarket dairy fridges. This year’s wet summer ruined animal feed, reducing cows’ outputs to 25 million liters less than last year. As a result, this year’s hot Christmas item isn’t the iPad or an Angry Birds game; it’s much more primitive: butter …

Read More: TIME

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Norway Wants Ship Back 80 Years After Sinking In Canadian Arctic

B&AShip

Photo: Ansgar Walk (CC)

Via Discovery News:

Eighty years after it sank in the Canadian Arctic, explorer Roald Amundsen’s three-mast ship Maud may once again sail across the Atlantic to become the centerpiece of a new museum in Norway.

Canada, however, must still agree to the repatriation plan hatched by Norwegian investors, amid strong opposition from locals in the Canadian territory of Nunavut who want the ship to stay for tourists to admire from shore.

The wreck now sits at the bottom of Cambridge Bay in Nunavut, but its hulk is partly visible above the frigid waters that preserved it for decades.

“The incredibly strong-built oak ship has been helped by the Arctic cold and clean water to be kept in a reasonably good shape,” said Jan Wanggaard, a Norwegian who recently visited the wreck to sort out technical problems with raising the ship as well as to survey the views from locals and officials.

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