Tag Archives | Occult

Apuleius Translated

English: Illustration from The Golden Ass. Cha...

English: Illustration from The Golden Ass. Charitë embraces her lover while Lucius, within the cave, looks on. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) (PD)

How to be an ass by knowing too little of context, or how nuance can make the difference.

via Harvard Review

 I’ve been looking at asses. More specifically, I have been weighing Sarah Ruden’s 2011 translation of The Golden Ass of Apuleius against the one I grew up with and have been sitting on all my life, Robert Graves’s 1951 version.

Strictly speaking, “The Golden Ass” isn’t the book’s proper name. More sedately known as Metamorphoses, written by the North African writer Lucius Apuleius in the second century CE, this work, often regarded as a proto-novel, follows the adventures of a young man perhaps not coincidentally named Lucius who trespasses trivially on occult secrets and—you’ll have to read for yourself how this is done—becomes the first, but not the last, to make an ass of himself.

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Magick, Aliens, and Skydiving: an In-Depth Interview with PuZuZu Ba’al

those-who-from-heaven-earth-came-puzuzu-baal-paperback-cover-artToday I’m interviewing PuZuZu Ba’al, and we are mostly going to be talking about his website “spellsandmagic.com” along with his experiences with alien life. To kick things off, other than Spells And Magic, do you want to talk a bit about yourself and your hobbies?

Myself now or… well to summarize it all up I was a little military brat and lived in quite a few different states and visited a few different countries in Europe. Started out in a mainstream religion; indoctrinated into the same mainstream religious stuff that most people are at a young age. Started into the occult probably around 16 or 17. My hobbies and stuff as far as now would be skydiving because when my dad was dying at the age of 50 (cancer, induced by Agent Orange) he told me, “Why don’t you do anything adventurous?” So I got into skydiving. I love it because it makes me feel like I have more of an appreciation for life when I do it.… Read the rest

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Los Angeles and the 1920s Occult Explosion

HollywoodMasonicTemple-1922For Angeleno disinfonauts, here’s some interesting occult history on the City of Angels that you may not have known about, found at the Steampunk Opera blog:

When folks think of explosions of wild spiritualities they usually think of the 1960s and 70s. But California in the 1920s was equally as crazy, and many would argue more.

The Victorian Era started the ball rolling with Spiritualism, Theosophy and The Golden Dawn. Between these, all the concepts that would grow and be experimented with through the 20th century emerged: mediuimship/channeling, clairovoyance, astral projection, astrology, mixtures of eastern and western religious concepts, past lives, ceremonial magick, cabalic esotericism for non Jews, the list is endless.

Of of these interests and the children of the Victorian generation who begat this explosion converged in Los Angeles during the 20s to the 40s.

It was at first accidental then purposeful. In 1920 the population of Los Angeles was 576, 673.

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The (Psycho)path to Liberation

PSYCHOPATH'S_BIBLE_COVER(Unfair warning: If you seek to gain anything from Dr. Hyatt’s work by your own willpower and mental processes, then do not read this article, for it defeats the entire purpose of reading and rereading his book.)

“Do not take anything in this book literally! Wait, on second thought, take it all literally!” – Joseph Matheny’s quote on the back of the book.

Do you ever wonder what would be possible if you decided to completely rid yourself of limitations – social, psychological, and otherwise? Would you use such methods to assist your fellow beings, or to manipulate them for your own ends? A book for such desire exists, and to be Limitless is the goal of all who persist through it. First-time contributor Donovan, here, to share my thoughts on Christopher Hyatt’s work, The Psychopath’s Bible.

I’m a twenty-something, sheltered white-male in the middle of a state that is filled almost entirely with suburbs.… Read the rest

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The Strange and Mysterious History of the Ouija Board

Original_ouija_boardThe last time we posted a story about ouija boards (How Ouija Boards Work) our commenters had some nasty back and forth. I’m sure you’ll be civil this time, right? From Smithsonian.com:

In February, 1891, the first few advertisements started appearing in papers: “Ouija, the Wonderful Talking Board,” boomed a Pittsburgh toy and novelty shop, describing a magical device that answered questions “about the past, present and future with marvelous accuracy” and promised “never-failing amusement and recreation for all the classes,” a link “between the known and unknown, the material and immaterial.” Another advertisement in a New York newspaper declared it “interesting and mysterious” and testified, “Proven at Patent Office before it was allowed. Price, $1.50.”

This mysterious talking board was basically what’s sold in board game aisles today: A flat board with the letters of the alphabet arrayed in two semi-circles above the numbers 0 through 9; the words “yes” and “no” in the uppermost corners, “goodbye” at the bottom; accompanied by a “planchette,” a teardrop-shaped device, usually with a small window in the body, used to maneuver about the board.

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Ancient Magician’s Curse Tablet Discovered In Jerusalem

curse tabletVia Live Science, what used to occur before people hired attorneys:

A lead curse tablet, dating back around 1,700 years and likely written by a magician, has been discovered in a collapsed Roman mansion in Jerusalem, archaeologists report.

The text is written in Greek and, in it a woman named Kyrilla invokes the names of six gods to cast a curse on a man named Iennys, apparently over a legal case.

Kyrilla asks the gods to ensure that “he in no way oppose, so that he say or perform nothing adverse to Kyrilla … but rather that Iennys, whom the womb bore, be subject to her…”

To obtain her goal Kyrilla combined elements from four religions. Of six gods invoked, four of them are Greek (Hermes, Persephone, Pluto and Hecate), one is Babylonian (Ereschigal) and one, Abrasax, is Gnostic. Additionally, the text contains magic words such as “Iaoth” that have a Hebrew/Judaism origin.

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Colorado Police Find Human And Animal Bones Used In Occult Rituals

occultThis is why you should never look in Grandpa’s shed. The Denver Post reports:

Lakewood police are investigating what they suspect are human and animal remains believed to have been used for occult worship.

Officers were called on Oct. 17 to the 1200 block of Kline Street where a cleaning crew hired made the discovery, said Steve Davis, Lakewood police spokesman. The bones were found in a shed, along with candles, bottles, chains and a crucifix.

The former owner of the home left the country in 1998 and has since died, police said. Investigators talked to people who knew the man, including at least one family member, who indicted he was an occultist, Davis said.

“It’s all very strange,” Davis said.

The items in question in the shed were extremely soiled, covered in multiple layers of dust and appeared to have been undisturbed for more than 15 years.

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The Horrifying Necropants Of Iceland

necropantsThe Museum of Icelandic Sorcery & Witchcraft houses the only known intact pair of necropants, a beyond-disturbing item popularly used for purposes of traditional magic in seventeenth century Iceland. To make your own (and thus reap good fortune), strike a deal with a friend than whoever dies first will allow the other wear the lower half of their corpse as a pair of pants, day and night:

If you want to make your own necropants (literally; nábrók) you have to get permission from a living man to use his skin after his death.

After he has been buried you must dig up his body and flay the skin of the corpse in one piece from the waist down. As soon as you step into the pants they will stick to your own skin.

A coin must be stolen from a poor widow and placed in the scrotum along with the magical sign, nábrókarstafur, written on a piece of paper.

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Selling Body Parts For Black Magic At Hospital Morgues

morgueIn the organ thieves’ defense, this is recycling. Via South Africa’s IOL News:

An extensive black market in human body parts has been uncovered in Swaziland’s second-largest hospital. Demand is strong in the country for human ingredients for use in traditional potions. Even the water used to wash corpses in the hospital mortuary is being sold to traditional healers.

The practice of selling human organs from the mortuary at Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital in the central commercial hub of Manzini is an open secret. A human brain costs R1,000. Other parts, from internal organs to body fat, fetch from R400 to R1,000.

Body parts are roasted and pulverised into an ash, and mixed with herbs for a potion that is either drunk, ingested or in some cases rubbed into the blood through a razor cut to the skin. The user is then endowed with supernatural power, according to belief.

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A Conversation with Richard Long, Author of ‘The Book of Paul’

LongGetting blurbed by Stephen King is the Holy Grail of the horror writer. If you don’t know what that means, it’s when an author (usually famous) reads your book and gives you a quote to put on the cover of your book to attract readers. For Stephen King to put his name on it, you know the book has to be outstanding. And when you’re talking about The Book of Paul, it is. I first heard Richard Long on a podcast and the way he described his book really caught my attention. He delves deeply into the occult, mythology, and astrophysics. As these are the same themes running through my books, especially The Portal Arcane series, I had to check it out. The Book of Paul does not disappoint. Long wrote it in a “cinematic” style that is fast-paced and streamlined. He doesn’t waste a lot of time on narrative description and his characters are so visceral you’ll swear you’ve been friends with them for years.… Read the rest

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