Tag Archives | Occult

Colorado Police Find Human And Animal Bones Used In Occult Rituals

occultThis is why you should never look in Grandpa’s shed. The Denver Post reports:

Lakewood police are investigating what they suspect are human and animal remains believed to have been used for occult worship.

Officers were called on Oct. 17 to the 1200 block of Kline Street where a cleaning crew hired made the discovery, said Steve Davis, Lakewood police spokesman. The bones were found in a shed, along with candles, bottles, chains and a crucifix.

The former owner of the home left the country in 1998 and has since died, police said. Investigators talked to people who knew the man, including at least one family member, who indicted he was an occultist, Davis said.

“It’s all very strange,” Davis said.

The items in question in the shed were extremely soiled, covered in multiple layers of dust and appeared to have been undisturbed for more than 15 years.

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The Horrifying Necropants Of Iceland

necropantsThe Museum of Icelandic Sorcery & Witchcraft houses the only known intact pair of necropants, a beyond-disturbing item popularly used for purposes of traditional magic in seventeenth century Iceland. To make your own (and thus reap good fortune), strike a deal with a friend than whoever dies first will allow the other wear the lower half of their corpse as a pair of pants, day and night:

If you want to make your own necropants (literally; nábrók) you have to get permission from a living man to use his skin after his death.

After he has been buried you must dig up his body and flay the skin of the corpse in one piece from the waist down. As soon as you step into the pants they will stick to your own skin.

A coin must be stolen from a poor widow and placed in the scrotum along with the magical sign, nábrókarstafur, written on a piece of paper.

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Selling Body Parts For Black Magic At Hospital Morgues

morgueIn the organ thieves’ defense, this is recycling. Via South Africa’s IOL News:

An extensive black market in human body parts has been uncovered in Swaziland’s second-largest hospital. Demand is strong in the country for human ingredients for use in traditional potions. Even the water used to wash corpses in the hospital mortuary is being sold to traditional healers.

The practice of selling human organs from the mortuary at Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital in the central commercial hub of Manzini is an open secret. A human brain costs R1,000. Other parts, from internal organs to body fat, fetch from R400 to R1,000.

Body parts are roasted and pulverised into an ash, and mixed with herbs for a potion that is either drunk, ingested or in some cases rubbed into the blood through a razor cut to the skin. The user is then endowed with supernatural power, according to belief.

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A Conversation with Richard Long, Author of ‘The Book of Paul’

LongGetting blurbed by Stephen King is the Holy Grail of the horror writer. If you don’t know what that means, it’s when an author (usually famous) reads your book and gives you a quote to put on the cover of your book to attract readers. For Stephen King to put his name on it, you know the book has to be outstanding. And when you’re talking about The Book of Paul, it is. I first heard Richard Long on a podcast and the way he described his book really caught my attention. He delves deeply into the occult, mythology, and astrophysics. As these are the same themes running through my books, especially The Portal Arcane series, I had to check it out. The Book of Paul does not disappoint. Long wrote it in a “cinematic” style that is fast-paced and streamlined. He doesn’t waste a lot of time on narrative description and his characters are so visceral you’ll swear you’ve been friends with them for years.… Read the rest

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An Interview With Occult Author and NLP Master, Philip H. Farber

Phil-FarberA couple of years ago, I realized that thanks to social media, I could start hunting down authors I was interested in like dogs, hounding them with questions I’d never been able to ask before.

One of these poor schmucks was Philip H. Farber, occult author of FutureRitual, Meta Magick: The Book of Atem, and Brain Magick: Exercises in Meta-Magick and Invocation.  He has also written a novel, The Great Purple Hoo-Ha.

Philip is a hypnotist, Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) practitioner, and magician.  Beside his books, he also teaches courses and seminars dealing with ritual magic and NLP.  DVDs of some of these can be found at Hawkridge Productions.

Friending Phil on Facebook was one of my smartest moves.  Not only was he willing to answer all of my questions at length, he was also quick to give me excellent reading recommendations.  And all for free.  What a sucker.… Read the rest

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The Devil’s Advocate: An Interview with Dr. Michael Aquino

Michael & Lilith Aquino

There are few people in this world who have sparked so much malice, hatred and anger as Dr. Michael Aquino. As a former member of The Church of Satan and the founder of The Temple of Set, he has made his mark in American culture as one of the most outrageous and memorable icons of the early Satanic and Left-Handed-Path movements.  Anyone who would do a Google search of Dr. Aquino would easily find video names like, “Aquino, Satanic Mind-Control Cults”, “NSA Long Range Takeover of America” and others.

The conspiracies about this man are virtually endless.  Some have claimed that he was the head of a child abuse ring that was sanctioned by the United States Government, others have claimed that he picked up where others left off in the mind control programs of MK Ultra and others like it.  There are murky stories about him sacrificing Viet Cong soldiers during his time in Vietnam and others in which he performed Nazi Occult Rituals.… Read the rest

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Hostile Spiritual Takeover: Thug Saints in the Cult of Maria Lionza

Maria Lionza RitualIn less than a month, tens of thousands of devotees to the cigar-smoking and liquor-swilling Venezuelan religious cult, El Espiritismo Marialioncero, will make their yearly pilgrimage to Sorte Mountain.  Located there is their most important spiritual site: a shrine to Maria Lionza, their highest deity, the spirit of a departed native chief’s daughter.

It is impossible to pin down exactly who Maria Lionza was, the differing accounts of her history being numerous and varied.  Whether or not she was an actual historical figure is still argued.  Few hints can be gathered from the many disassociated images of her, some showing a crowned, green-eyed girl surrounded by the forest and animals, and some, like the famous statue by Alejandro Colina standing beside the Francisco Fajardo Highway in Caracas, depicting a warrior woman, astride a tapir, holding a female pelvis above her head.

Maria LionzaOne of the more common stories places her birth sometime during the 16th century, among the native Nivar tribe.  Her birth name was Yara, which, in an attempt by the Spanish to Christianize her story, would later be changed to Maria.  It is said that the tribe’s shaman prophesied the coming of a green-eyed girl who would have to be sacrificed to the Great Anaconda to divert the destruction of the tribe.  Yara’s father, upon seeing her eyes, decided to save the baby from her would-be killers, and hid her in a cave.  She grew up there, watched over by twenty-two warriors, until the day she sneaked away and visited the nearby lagoon.  There, the Great Anaconda caught sight of her, and, falling in love with her, demanded she come away with him.  Yara refused, and in retaliation, he swallowed her whole.  But immediately, the Great Anaconda began to swell, displacing the waters of the lagoon, and flooding the village, destroying the tribe.  He continued to swell until he burst, and the unscathed Yara emerged.… Read the rest

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The Burning of Zozobra and Other Scapegoat Rituals

Burning of ZozobraThe 89th annual Burning of Zozobra, a 50 foot effigy of “Old Man Gloom,” was staged last Thursday in Santa Fe, NM.  The ceremony is a part of the Fiestas de Santa Fe, a festival celebrating the 1692 reconquest of the city by Spanish colonists in 1692.  My wife and I were planning on going this year, since we only live about an hour away, but a combination of heat, laziness, and the newest episode of Breaking Bad kept us at home in the air-conditioning.  Over 30,000 people showed up to the burning this year.  We weren’t missed.

Zozobra (named after the Spanish word meaning “anxiety”) was created by local artist Will Schuster in 1924.  The original was a 6 foot tall marionette, constructed of cloth and wood, which represented the worries and difficulties of the residents of Santa Fe.  Schuster received his inspiration from a ritual practiced by the Yaqui people of Mexico, known as the Burning of Judas.  This ritual was performed during the week of Easter as a part of the Passion Play, in which the effigies of Judas and other villains was hanged on Good Friday and burned on Easter Sunday.… Read the rest

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How The Occult Brought Cremation To America

cremationVia the Huffington Post, Mitch Horowitz reveals how the practice of cremating the dead came to the United States – partially as an anti-vampire measure – and kindled anti-pagan riots and panic in New York City:

Cremation was introduced to America in the 1870s by a retired Civil War colonel, Henry Steel Olcott, with a deep interest in the esoteric and paranormal. Since leaving the military, he had become an investigator of ghostly phenomena and a globetrotting advocate for the rights of Hindus and Buddhists.

While cremation possessed ancient roots, it was little known among Americans. Indeed, to most late nineteenth-century Westerners, the concept of cremation seemed otherworldly and even un-Christian.

But Olcott saw cremation (mostly) as a social reform: more sanitary than burial, a deterrent to disease, and a help in freeing up land and labor from inefficient burials. And then there was the deterrence of vampirism, which Olcott took seriously: “…there are no vampires save countries where the dead are buried.”

To promote the practice, Olcott organized the nation’s first public cremation service — or “pagan funeral,” as the press called it — at New York’s Masonic Hall on the westside of Manhattan.

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