Occupy Movement

“How can so many demonstrations accomplish so little?” asks Moses Naim at The Atlantic: Street protests are in. From Bangkok to Caracas, and Madrid to Moscow, these days not a week goes…

After helicoptering in and praising Occupy Sandy this past Thursday (watch below), On Friday New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg threatened to have police shut down the only relief effort actually providing on-the-scene assistance to storm-affected New Yorkers. Via Occupy Wall Street:

The mayor’s office is calling upon local police forces to “clear all outdoor sites” effective immediately. Staten Island police representing the mayor’s office have threatened eviction action against the crucial Staten Island hub in the heavily hit Midland Beach area.

Aiman Youssef, a 42-year-old Syrian-American Staten Islander whose house was destroyed in the hurricane, has been running a 24/7 community pop up hub outside his property at 489 Midland Avenue. Community members are serving hot food and offering non-perishables, medical supplies, and clothing to the thousands of residents who are still without heat, power, or safe housing. This popular hub is well-run, well-staffed, and has a constant hum of discussion, support, and advice as well as volunteer dispatch through another pop-up group.

The Denmark-based multinational Danske Bank is one of the world’s largest, with assets worth about $600 billion. Its new marketing campaign, fascinating in much the same fashion as a train wreck, is based around the slogans “Occupy” and “A New Normal”:

The strategy is intended to restore trust in the Bank and ensure that we live up to our new vision of being “Recognised as the most trusted financial partner.” In order to reach that objective, we must set new standards for banking operations.

Via the Nation, David Graeber on rebellion against indebtedness: The rise of [Occupy Wall Street] allowed us to start seeing the system for what it is: an enormous engine of debt extraction….

A year after it all began, the Occupy protests returned to the New York Stock Exchange this morning, with more than a hundred arrests notched by the early afternoon. Raw Story reported a few hours ago:

A New York University professor and an artist featured in The Nation magazine this month were among more than 90 people arrested early Monday morning as Occupy Wall Street marked its first anniversary with various demonstrations in New York City. “Just grabbed off sidewalk, along with everyone else,” artist Molly Crabapple said on Twitter shortly after being picked up by police.

Elsewhere, Jacobin magazine founding editor Bhaskar Sunkara reported that NYU Social and Cultural Analysis professor Andrew Ross, was arrested as part of a demonstration in the lobby of the JP Morgan Chase building on Park Avenue. “Cops are never friendly, but these cops aren’t cops,” Sunkara said. “They’re militarized beyond comprehension.”

What happens next? The Village Voice gives a glimpse at some of the projects Occupy organizers are now working on, as they form alliances with immigrant and labor groups, look beyond the…

Apparently the Chalk Walk demonstration held as part of the LA Artwalk was viewed as a threat by authorities. NowPublic writes:

The LAPD takes sidewalk chalk very seriously. Seriously enough to send 140 riot police to forcibly stop an Occupy LA group from drawing on the sidewalk during LA Artwalk.

“They were vandalizing the sidewalk and privately owned buildings writing in chalk. The city attorney – this is something they prosecute. It is a misdemeanor and sometimes it can be a felony,” the LAPD’s Norma Eisenman told KPCC.

19 people were arrested after the police attacked the Chalk Walk demonstration with batons, rubber bullets, and tear gas.

Media theorist Douglas Rushkoff’s talk from Social Media Week in February 2012. As Doug explains it was “when Jeremy Linsanity was at its peak – and while I use his style of play and leadership as a metaphor, the speech is actually about the new form of activism embodied by Occupy and beyond.”

A never-before-published transcript  reveals what John Lennon talked about with Timothy Leary during a “bed-in” at a hotel in Montreal. Just three months before Lennon left the Beatles — and the same…