Via Open University of the Left:

With more than 1,400 Occupy sites in the U.S., the success of Occupiers as a social movement and as a force for challenging austerity on the ground — supporting labor union struggles, reversing home foreclosures, opposing deportations, and raising awareness of education cuts and college loans — has raised the inescapable question of “which way forward?”

Mainstream and independent media have been quick to offer the Occupy movement an endless stream of advice. Yet, even when offered with the best intentions, much of this counsel is misguided.

OUL welcomes a panel of Chicago Occupiers to demystify the actions and experience of this creative and vital movement; demonstrate that the movement remains most connected to the needs of its immediate communities, rather then external guidance; and discuss the ways in which Occupy remains open to all levels of commitment by individuals and communities, as these panelists will introduce and outline. Participants were: Joe Macare, Brit Schulte, Rachael Perrotta and Natalie Wahlberg.

TSA PrecheckBecause rich people sure do hate being inconvenienced. Via the WSJ:

Hate the full-body scans, pat-downs and slow going at TSA airport security screening checkpoints? For $100, you can now bypass the hassle.

The Transportation Security Administration is rolling out expedited screening at big airports called “Precheck.” It has special lanes for background-checked travelers, who can keep their shoes, belt and jacket on, leave laptops and liquids in carry-on bags and walk through a metal detector rather than a full-body scan. The process, now at two airlines and nine airports, is much like how screenings worked before the Sept. 11 attacks.

To qualify, frequent fliers must meet undisclosed TSA criteria and get invited in by the airlines. There is also a backdoor in. Approved travelers who are in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s “Global Entry” program can transfer into Precheck using their Global Entry number.

Toronto filmmaker Bert McKinley lets his camera do the talking:

In early October 2011 I went down to New York City to spend a long weekend at Zuccotti park – Campsite for Occupy Wall Street. This is what I saw and some of people I talked to in my 3 days spent at Occupy.

Did any disinfonauts go to Zuccotti this weekend? If so please supplement this report from Reuters: Dozens of Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested during the weekend as police cleared New York’s Zuccotti…

Erik Eckholm ponders the future of the Occupy movement, writing at the New York Times: The ragtag Occupy Wall Street encampments that sprang up in scores of cities last fall, thrusting “We…

Chris Hedges writes about the Black Bloc at Alternet (thanks to Adam for the tip): The Black Bloc anarchists, who have been active on the streets in Oakland and other cities, are…

Every social movement I have been involved with, or covered as a journalist, develops its own language of liberation, its own alphabet, and its own buzzwords, rhetoric and discourse. Here are some…

Joker Burns MoneyHopefully they make wiser decisions now. As Alison Bowen reports in Metro New York:

Nearly two months after the NYPD raided Zuccotti Park, Occupy Wall Street protesters are now deciding how to spend $300,000 left in their coffers.

At a recent meeting, protesters debated what to do with the money, down from $706,855 at the movement’s peak, according to the New York Post. Much of that $700K came via online donations from OWS supporters and has already been spent on food and supplies.

The remaining OWS members meet daily at the atrium at 60 Wall Street. During one such meeting, the Post reported, one of the ideas pitched included burning the cash in a bonfire on Wall Street, a suggestion that has since been dropped.

Nothing developed by humans can withstand the test of time forever, and that includes capitalism. Via Jacobin Magazine, Pete Frase spins four possible scenarios, including the utopian, the distopian and the in-between,…