Tag Archives | ocean

Research Suggests that Warmer Oceans Are Releasing Stored Methane

Sonar image of bubbles rising from the seafloor off the Washington coast. The base of the column is 515 meters deep (about 1/3 of a mile) and the top of the plume is at 1/10 of a mile (180 meters) deep. Credit: Brendan Philip/University of Washington

Sonar image of bubbles rising from the seafloor off the Washington coast. The base of the column is 515 meters deep (about 1/3 of a mile) and the top of the plume is at 1/10 of a mile (180 meters) deep.
Credit: Brendan Philip/University of Washington

There is some contention over the veracity of the feedback loops used in various climate models. In short, everyone agrees that CO2 demonstrably captures infrared radiation and will make the earth warmer when found in higher concentrations; its presence in the atmosphere alone will undeniably create some degree of warming. This warming from CO2 alone is not what climate models use to predict future temperature, because there is a massive number of other variables and feedback loops present in Earth’s systems and cycles, e.g. water vapor, cloud cover, dust, methane concentration, ocean absorption of carbon, marine life sequestration, absorption by plant life, overall albedo, NOx concentrations, sun variability, etc.… Read the rest

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Shoe Made From Recycled Ocean Trash

Screen Shot 2015-07-02 at 11.12.41 AM

I’m currently posting this from the beach, and it makes my blood boil when people litter. So, it seemed fitting.

Laura Feinstein via GOOD:

As a rule I’m skeptical of big brands “going green,” but it seems adidas might just be on to something. Recently the sporty retail giant teamed up with Parley for the Oceans—an idealistic group of “creators, thinkers and leaders” attempting to re-purpose the ocean’s overwhelming amount of trash into reusable material—for a mystery project. Monday at the United Nations the brand unveiled their collaboration: the world’s first ever shoe upper made solely from harvested ocean plastic and illegal deep-sea gillnets. The nets were retrieved after a 110-day expedition by Parley partner organization Sea Shepherd, where they tracked an illegal poaching vessel off the coast of West Africa.

The prototype is just the first in a yet-to-be-released line of consumer-ready ocean-plastic products the brand will launch later this year.

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The real Alien vs. Predator is occurring right now in Antarctic waters


Dr. M via Deep Sea News:

In the freezing and dark waters of the Antarctic, two marine species are pitted against each other in a battle of survival. Each of the players in the evolutionary game is trying to avoid a permanent residency in the other’s stomach. One of the competitors, you may not be surprised by. The behemoth colossal squid can reach sizes of sizes of 495 kg (1091 lbs) and 4.2 meters (13.8 feet). The colossal squid’s competitor? The Antarctic toothfish reaching a puny 200 cm (6.5 feet) and 80 kg (176 pounds) in length at is biggest. Not exactly the size to take on the hooked tentacular mass of a colossal squid. Yet attacks and feedings of this two biological killing machines on each other occurs frequently in the natural world’s answer to Alien vs. Predator.

Remeslo and colleagues*** report 71 toothfish with deep wounds from squid beaks or scratches from suckers.

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Winnebago Ice Tsunami [Video]

So, what the hell is happening here? Luckily IFL Science has the answer:

Ice shoves occur when strong winds or currents force the ice from the water’s surface to go on land. These events are also called “ice tsunamis” because of the way they come on land, but ice shoves are closer to icebergs than tsunamis in how they work.

The force from the ice shove can be powerful enough to knock over trees, houses, and docks that stand in its way.

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Scientists Discover Huge ‘Bathtub Ring’ Of Oil On Sea Floor From BP Spill

Louisiana GOHSEP (CC by-sa 2.0)

Louisiana GOHSEP (CC by-sa 2.0)

More bad news.

via Think Progress:

Scientists have discovered yet another unforeseen effect of BP’s historic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico: a 1,235-square-mile “bathub ring” of oil on the deep ocean’s floor.

Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science on Monday showed that approximately 10 million gallons of oil settled and coagulated on the floor of the Gulf near the Deepwater Horizon rig, which spilled a total of 172 million gallons of oil into the ocean in April 2010. That oil left a footprint on the ocean floor about two times the size of the city of Houston, Texas, and approximately the size of the state of Rhode Island, the study said.

Study author David Valentine told the Associated Press that tests to determine the oil’s chemical signature were not performed because the oil has degraded in the four and a half years since the spill occurred, but also said it’s obvious where the oil is from, since it settled directly around the site of the damaged rig.

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An Italian Couple Get Stuck Together During Intercourse “Due to Suction”

By Patricia Gavra via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

By Patricia Gavra via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

h/t io9

via The Local:

Il Mattino reported that the amorous couple were making the most of a warm day, and a practically deserted beach, when they decided to take a dip in the ocean at Porto San Giorgio to express their love.

But their lovemaking came to an embarrassing end when the man was unable to extricate himself from the woman due to suction, the newspaper said.

They remained in the water until they caught the attention of a woman walking along the beach, who gave them a towel after they struggled back to the shore.

A doctor was called and they were taken to a hospital emergency room. There the woman was given an injection usually used to dilate the uterus of pregnant women, in order to untangle the couple.

This is not the first report to emerge this year of a couple getting stuck together while having sex.

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Giant Octopuses: The Underrated Cephalopods of the Sea

"Giant Pacific Octopus Being Playful" by Michael Bentley via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

“Giant Pacific Octopus Being Playful” by Michael Bentley via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via Mysterious Universe:

When people think of giant tentacled beasts of the sea, surely the first creature to spring to mind is the giant squid or colossal squid. These are the rock stars of oversized cephalopods, and hog all the spotlight from their kin, the octopuses. It is often overlooked that there are very large octopuses lurking in the depths of our oceans, and if numerous reports from around the world are anything to go by, some of them are just as large and frightening as any giant squid.

The currently largest known octopus is the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini), which inhabits the waters of the coastal North Pacific along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, northern Japan and Korea, and are found at depths of up to 2,000 m (6,600 ft). The giant Pacific octopus is truly enormous, and particularly large specimens can reach weights of up to 50 kg (110 lb) and have a radial arm span of a whopping 6 m (20 ft).

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