Is the breathtaking stone structure the work of a 10,000-year-old civilization, or is it somehow an illusion? Atlas Obscura explains: The Yonaguni-jima Kaitei Chikei, literally translated as “Yonaguni Island Submarine Topography,” is…

Would you be brave enough to journey to the black, endless bottom of the sea and mess with a mysterious cylinder resting there? Via the Huffington Post:

A mysterious cylindrical object is sitting 300 feet at the bottom of the Baltic Sea between Sweden and Finland, and nobody knows what it is — yet. Deep sea divers using remote-controlled cameras are heading to the site on Friday. They’ll try to determine the exact identity of the object, which side-scan sonar first revealed in June 2011.

In what’s been compared to an episode of “The X-Files,” Peter Lindberg, captain of the Ocean Explorer, and his co-researcher Dennis Asberg made global headlines last year when they presented sonar images of a nearly 200-foot-wide circular anomaly.

Mariana TrenchMore people have been to the Moon than to the bottom of the Mariana Trench. Reports Steve Gorman on the Christian Science Monitor:

Returning from humankind’s first solo dive to the deepest spot in the ocean, filmmaker James Cameron said he saw no obvious signs of life that might inspire creatures in his next “Avatar” movie but was awestruck by the “complete isolation.” The Oscar-winning director and undersea explorer said his record-setting expedition to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, 7 miles beneath the surface of the western Pacific, not only capped seven years of painstaking preparation but was the “culmination of a lifelong dream.”

Is the coming tide an uninhabitable ocean? Reports the AFP via Alternet: High levels of pollution may be turning the planet’s oceans acidic at a faster rate than at any time in…

Biologists are finding new species constantly, but it took a hungry market and working fishermen to find this new shark species. The National Geographic reports: It’s unlikely anyone’s ever complained, “Waiter, there’s…

medium_baltic-ufo-and-trackSomething very large and circular slid across the ocean floor off the coast of Sweden. Is it a UFO? If so, our extraplanetary visitors should be commended on selecting the best country for initiating contact. Via Gizomodo:

Swedish sea treasure hunters have found something extraordinary: A 60-foot disc sunk in the bottom of the ocean, with what appears to be 985-foot-long impact tracks leading to it.

OysterOK if it’s not global warming related (a very contentious issue on disinfo.com), what the hell has been f#cking these oysters? Rachel Kaufman writes on National Geographic News:

New strain can kill 80 percent of an oyster bed in a week, experts say. Don’t worry — oyster herpes isn’t a new side effect of eating “the food of love.”

The incurable, deadly virus is, however, alarming fishing communities in Europe, where oyster herpes seems to be spreading — and could go on spreading as seas continue to warm, experts say.

In July lab testing of farmed oysters detected the first known United Kingdom cases of herpes in the shellfish. The virus has already killed between 20 to 100 percent of breeding Pacific oysters in some French beds in 2008, 2009, and 2010, according to the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea.

JAWSChuck Patterson is clearly a survivor, as he describes:

… the day before I shot this video, i was surfing with a couple friends and 2 sharks circled us for about 15 minutes. the next day, i decided to go back out at around the same time and take my GO PRO HD HERO camera mounted on a 10 ft pole and do some exploring.

Sure enough within 5 minutes a 9 ft shark came out of no where and circled twice and slapped his tail on my board before disappearing. then a minute later a 7 ft young juvenile Great White swam circles around me for 12 minutes. It was an unreal experience that I will cherish forever…

If only the good Mr. Quint had such fortune …

Gulf Coasr Oil Spill ProjectionCyriaque Lamar posted on io9.com this interesting research from the University of Hawaii. Cyriaque Lamar writes:

Researchers at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa have created a simulation of the potential spread of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill over 360 days. Their hypothetical scenario? All sorts of bad.

Researchers at Mānoa’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) have created a model that charts the oil’s possible path over the course of approximately a year:

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is not alone. We now have our very own on the East coast. Via AP:


Researchers are warning of a new blight on the ocean: a swirl of confetti-like plastic debris stretching over thousands of square miles (kilometers) in a remote expanse of the Atlantic Ocean.

The floating garbage — hard to spot from the surface and spun together by a vortex of currents — was documented by two groups of scientists who trawled the sea between scenic Bermuda and Portugal’s mid-Atlantic Azores islands.

“We found the great Atlantic garbage patch,” said Anna Cummins, who collected plastic samples on a sailing voyage in February.

The debris is harmful for fish, sea mammals — and at the top of the food chain, potentially humans — even though much of the plastic has broken into such tiny pieces they are nearly invisible.

Evidence of global warming? From Discovery News: A massive iceberg struck Antarctica, dislodging another giant block of ice from a glacier, Australian and French scientists said Friday. The two icebergs are drifting…