Tag Archives | Open Source

A History Of Subversive Remix Videos

Artist Jonathan McIntosh presents 30 of the best and most notable mashup videos from before the age of YouTube:

Political remixes can be traced back to the 1920s, when Soviet filmmakers like Esfir Shub recut American Hollywood films to give them a sharper class commentary. During World War II, Charles A. Ridley created (and gave away for free) the first viral political mashup by reediting footage of Nazi soldiers to make them appear to dance and sing to the tune “The Lambeth Walk.” When VCRs became more widely accessible in the early 1980s, UK artists calling themselves video scratchers appropriated television footage to create biting critiques of pop culture media and Margaret Thatcher’s economic policies [and] recut television commercials and music videos to provide a feminist critique.

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E+SM Mix: Evolution for Your Ears

MixlpHave you ever wondered what a planetary transformation of society and consciousness based on the integration of esoteric philosophy, shamanic practice, design science, dance floor grooves, and cutting-edge communications technology might sound like? We hope so, because we devised our first free E+SM Mix: Evolution for Your Ears, to satisfy this secret yearning.

At the Evolver Social Movement, we believe in the concept of free – of sharing, foraging, scavenging, bittorenting, and all forms of open-source opportunism. We are, therefore, delighted to offer Evolution for Your Ears to you gratis, as a gift, with positively no strings attached, ever. In fact, we believe that everything should be free, from now until the end of time or the death of God, whichever comes first.

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Iceland Uses Social Media to Write New Constitution

Coat Of Arms Of IcelandAaron Saenz writes on Singularity Hub:

The newest government in the world was designed with help from comments on the internet. God help us all.

After Iceland’s economic collapse in 2008, the island nation decided it was time to write a new constitution, this one not based on its parent country of Denmark but rather made from the original ideas of its citizens. Iceland’s small population of 320,000 elected 25 assembly members from 522 ordinary candidates (including lawyers, political science professors, journalists, and many other professions), who in turn opened their process up to the public in an unprecedented fashion.

The Constitutional Council was highly active on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr, where they solicited comments and suggestions for the new government. On Friday July 29th, 2011, the Iceland parliament officially received the new constitution, comprised of 114 articles divided into 9 chapters. Set to be reviewed, and then put before vote for ratification by October 1st, the internet-assisted document marks a possible paradigm shift in governing.

Read the rest

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Open-Sourced Blueprints for Civilization (Video)

Via TED:

Using wikis and digital fabrication tools, TED Fellow Marcin Jakubowski is open-sourcing the blueprints for 50 farm machines, allowing anyone to build their own tractor or harvester from scratch. And that’s only the first step in a project to write an instruction set for an entire self-sustaining village (starting cost: $10,000).

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Can “Open Source” Save Science From Greed?

The transhumanist convening the first “Open Science Summit” at Harvard urges us to free “our scientific and technological commons” and enable “a new era of decentralized, distributed innovation to solve our greatest challenges.”

H+ SUMMIT

Joseph Jackson is calling for “a renegotiation of the social contract for science,” arguing that our current patent system stifles innovation. “All sorts of biases and agendas creep into our science and technology policy, affecting which paths are taken, and who controls the outputs of research… If obsolete business models focused on proprietary short-term advantage lead to the wrong platform in synthetic biology or nanotech, it may be game over.

“Digital rights management is problematic enough. Imagine ‘Neurological Rights Management’ asserted over your brain-machine interface.”

This is my favorite line. “At Harvard I studied political philosophy, or ‘political science,’ in the mistaken belief that government and politics were one of mankind’s most important tools for solving collective action
problems.… Read the rest

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Can Open Source Manufacturing Save Humanity?

Open source manufacturing essentially lets you download hardware from the web — free packages of coded instructions to make…well, just about anything.

It leverages collaborative “hackerspace” dens and fab labs, while the Social Engineering-Knowledge Database simplifies searching for free open source hardware designs and creating materials lists by organizing them into packages with things like CAD files, assembly instructions, and a bill of materials…

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