Tag Archives | orwell

8th June 2014 – Time For Big Brother to Retire!

On 8th June George Orwell’s surveillance crazed czar of surveillance Big Brother will be 65 years old (in literary years). To mark the date we urge all lovers of freedom to take part in the annual 1984 Action Day and to call for Big Brother to hang up his high visibility surveillance jacket and retire.

Orwell’s novel ’1984′ was first published on 8th June 1949. Now, sixty-five years later and thirty years after the book’s title year, few if any of Orwell’s warnings have been heeded. The slogans of the book’s ruling party: “War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength” are encoded in the marketing style propaganda of modern political parties. A surveillance state has been built all around us whilst we are encouraged to “share” our concerns in a modern reworking of the 2 minute hate – the 140 character tweet fest – hash tag “what about that funny dog!”

We are living in the dystopian world of ’1984′ now.… Read the rest

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Why We’re Not Living in 1984: “Orwell’s Oversight”

Picture: JoyHill09 (CC)

Picture: JoyHill09 (CC)

“Orwell’s oversight”

Any instance where the establishment’s official line is contradicted by the communications revolution. Orwell suggested a society where citizens were constantly watched and controlled by surveilence technology. We live instead in a world where everyone is watched by everyone else and “the rulers of the world” are no exception.

The following article from CNN is worth reading, as is the book, 1984 by George Orwell, a novel which changed my life for the better:

CNN: We’re Living 1984 Today We live in a world that George Orwell predicted in “1984.” And that realization has caused sales of the 1949, dystopian novel to spike dramatically upward recently — a 9,000% increase at one point on Amazon.com.

1984 is a victim of its own success. It’s a vision so compelling it has enchanted many, including those in positions of power, as an inevitable vision of our future in fact as opposed to fiction.… Read the rest

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Experience JoyCamp and Escape the Orwellian Brave New World Order (Interview & Movie)


History… Interview and a Movie: Experience JoyCamp and Escape the Orwellian Brave New World

Tonight, on History… So it Doesn’t Repeat: We feature an interview and a movie with the comedy phenomenon known as JoyCamp, sharing their creative intellect and conscious comedy with all who could use a few laughs. We’ll discover what makes truth so funny, and how to conquer our own fears in the process.

JoyCamp is a term coined by George Orwell in his book 1984, The further life of a “comrade” continues under the watchful eyes of the Party. Everything people do is recorded by the telescreens. Even in their homes people have telescreens. Each unorthodox action is then punished by “joycamps” (Newspeak word for forced labour camps”). In the 21st century, JoyCamp is the antithesis of tyranny of the mind, it’s a liberation from dogma and an inspiration for creativity in life.

Would You Like to Know More?… Read the rest

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Orwell, Dali and “Degenerate Art”

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/90/DaliGreatMasturbator.jpg/320px-DaliGreatMasturbator.jpg

Via orwellwasright:

When the Nazis mounted the exhibition Degenerate Art in Munich in 1937, it could be said that modern art was ironically validated in the eyes of cultural history. After all, a black mark from fascism – which promoted “art” that exalted blood and toil, racial purity and obedience – implies that modern art at that time stood for everything the Nazis opposed. This is, of course, simplistic reasoning – “modern art” at the time stood for many things, sometimes attempting to deliberately eschew ideology altogether, often apolitical and frequently controversial.

But the Nazis weren’t the only ones to see modern art as something controversial, or worse, a threat to the very values that underpin society. George Orwell – who sat about as far away from the political ideology of the Nazis as one can get – also perceived a moral degradation in the output of one of the most notoriously subversive artists of the time, Salvador Dali.… Read the rest

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