Outer Space


It’s espresso… IN SPAAAAAAAAAACE!!!!! Astronauts aboard the International Space Station will soon wake up to a stellar view of Earth while sipping an invigorating cup — or, actually, a pouch — of…





Want to spend eternity orbiting the stars? For $1,990, the San Francisco-based startup Elysium Space will include the cremated remains of you or a loved one on a capsule being shot into space several months from now:

Elysium Space offers awe-inspiring memorial spaceflights to have a symbolic portion of a departed’s ashes launched into space. Elysium Space is a unique team of space and funeral experts, combining experience from major NASA space missions and deep-rooted funeral profession knowledge. Launches take place in the United States at the Cape Canaveral launch facility in Florida.

You receive a kit containing a custom ash capsule to collect a cremated remains sample. After you ship it back to us, we place your capsule in the Elysium spacecraft that will be launched into space. Our specially designed memorial spacecraft respectfully and peacefully orbits the Earth for several months. Our next launch is scheduled for summer 2014.


The new balanced diet includes space fruits. The Independent reports: NASA has announced plans to grow plants on the moon by 2015 in a project designed to further humanity’s chances of successfully colonising…













From LunaCognita, a handy overview of extraterrestrial strangeness:

This compilation includes many of my favorite NASA UFO encounters/sightings that I have archived over the years. All of these examples (with the exception of the second-to-last one) were captured on film by NASA astronauts or Russian Cosmonauts over the past half-century – showing many amazing examples from different eras – Gemini, Apollo, Apollo/Soyuz Test Project, Skylab, STS, the ISS, plus a couple Russian-source additions from their unmanned Zond and Mir Space Station programs as well thrown in to round things out.


Dreaming of planned libertarian communities seems to be all the rage. But perhaps the only place they can succeed is in outer space. Via Smithsonian Magazine, Matt Novak on the 1978 think-tank-produced movie Libra:

Produced and distributed by a free-market group based in San Diego called World Research, Inc., the 40-minute film is set in the year 2003 and gives viewers a look at two vastly different worlds. On Earth, a world government has formed and everything is micromanaged to death, killing private enterprise. But in space, there’s true hope for freedom. Viewers get an interesting peek into what daily life is like when a Libra resident shows off her Abacus computer,  which is a bit like Siri.

The film’s vision for 2003 isn’t very pleasant — at least for those left on Earth. The people of Libra seem happy, while those on Earth cope with the world government’s dystopian top-down management of resources.