Tag Archives | Paranoia

NASA: The End Of Mankind “Leaked Document”

Here’s your daily dose of paranoia fuel and an excuse to be outraged all wrapped up in one.

via Youtube

This is a very important video with Deborah Tavares and Trevor Coppola discussing the newly revealed NASA FUTURE WARFARE DOCUMENT. People need to be informed at least given the chance to see this information and make the decision themselves to believe and act on it or not.

 

Continue Reading

Illuminati Training Video Leaked

Enjoy this parody(?) video by filmmaker Matt Anderson.

Anderson explains the video as follows:
“Illumicorp is a parody of sorts. I guess the best way to describe it is that I wanted to make a corporate training video for the ‘Illuminati’ that synthesized all of the conspiracy information floating around. If such a group did exist, how would they really function? My wager was they would act just like any other faceless mega-corporation. It was originally to be part of a larger project, but that never came about so I released Illumicorp as it’s own standalone video.”… Read the rest

Continue Reading

FBI Spied On Sartre And Camus In Effort To Unravel Subversive Conspiracy Behind Existentialism

sartre_jpThe New York Times reports that beginning in 1945, the FBI began spying on the French philosophers, fearing that their ideas on being and nothingness were part of a plot against the United States:

[Sartre and Camus]’s lectures at Columbia University were well attended by students and faculty members — and by agents from J. Edgar Hoover’s F.B.I.

Yet Sartre, on his visit, was actually invited to the Pentagon; Camus, in contrast, “was stopped at immigration…Hoover sent out a ‘stop letter’ to all U.S. customs agents saying this man should be detained,” Mr. Martin said. Eventually, Camus was allowed to proceed to New York, where his novel “L’Étranger” (“The Stranger”) had just been published in English.

“Hoover thought there must be some kind of conspiracy between communists, blacks, poets and French philosophers. He was hoping for some kind of evidence of conspiracy,” he said.

The F.B.I. was baffled by Sartre. “These agents were trying to work out what the hell existentialism was all about,” said Mr.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Kerry Thornley, Discordianism, and the JFK Assassination

Kerry ThornleyIt’s been fifty years since the Kennedy assassination.  Fifty years since the conspiracy subculture came screaming out of the hivemind’s womb.  Fifty years since the CIA made “conspiracy theorist” a derogatory term (if you believe some people).  I planned to acknowledge the day with some kind of drinking game associated with the Zapruder film, but I couldn’t make it work.

Everyone remembers where they were when Kennedy died, but no one seems to be able to pinpoint the moment they were dragged into conspiracy land.  I was ripe for it.  I believe everything I hear for at least five seconds.  And there’s something sexy about an intricate web of connections.  Thankfully, I was exposed to Robert Anton Wilson’s playful brand of agnosticism at an early age and escaped delusion’s evil clutches.

So, of course, he just had to be tied into the JFK assassination.

Wilson, in his introduction to the Prankster and the Conspiracy, says he was accused of being a CIA “handler” by author Kerry Thornley, who was convinced that he had been the subject of MK-Ultra experiments along with his army buddy, (here it comes) Lee Harvey Oswald.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Scientists Point to ‘Motivated Reasoning’ As Culprit Behind ‘Conspiracist Thinking’

Don’t worry: I’m sure they’ll have a pill to treat your “motivated reasoning” disorder soon.

Via Scientific American:

Like many in the USA, especially perhaps those of us not allowed to go to work right now or with reason to feel anxious about the future, I’m particularly pre-occupied by these issues at the moment, and the various impediments to clear, community-spirited thinking.

And then researchers serendipitously dropped another relevant study on cognitive bias into the literature. Lewandowsky, Gignac and Oberauer conducted a study of people in the USA. It’s here in PLOS One.

They discuss a way that science communication processes can sometimes backfire. When the views of people seen as experts converge on an issue, it has a strong influence on other people’s thinking. So generally, a strong scientific consensus can be convincing to many others, too. Climate science is an example where growing consensus among scientists reduced the influence of climate change denial.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Driver Killed After Ramming White House Gates Believed Obama Was Electronically Monitoring Her

miriam careyThe tragic death of a young woman struggling with mental health issues apparently was inspired by a chilling, very contemporary schizophrenic delusion: that she was trapped in a reality television show under the surveillance of Barack Obama. ABC News writes:

The woman who led police on a high-speed chase near the U.S. Capitol before being shot dead had a history of mental illness and believed President Obama was electronically monitoring her Connecticut home in order to broadcast her life on television, sources said.

Miriam Carey, a dental hygienist from Stamford, Conn., was killed by police [a week ago] after trying to ram a White House gate and leading cops on a chase down Pennsylvania Avenue with her 1-year-old daughter in the car.

According to sources Carey believed she was capable of communicating with Obama. According to sources, Carey had a family history of schizophrenia and was taking medication for a mental illness.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Conspiracy Classic: ‘Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars’

m-YwnrjrR9EAc0i5RhiPczQSilent Weapons for Quiet Wars is a classic text of the conspiracy theorist subculture: A document that lays out step-by-step a plan to conquer the world through propaganda, currency devaluation, economic shock and constant warfare, among other things. It was supposedly recovered from a surplus copy machine by a Boeing Aircraft employee, and while it was initially reprinted in William Cooper’s Behold a Pale Horse, no one is sure who wrote it (although many seem certain that it is former Federal prisoner Hartford van Dyke).In the thirty-plus years since the document was discovered, researchers have attributed it to satanists, the Illuminati, the Bilderberg Group, the New World Order and other secretive organizations. Undoubtedly, its mysterious origin adds to its sinister appeal.

If you’re not familiar with the document, you can read it here.

 … Read the rest

Continue Reading

Eshu and the Black/Red Hat

tumblr_mr7dmwBkdO1qbdir4o1_400

GIF: Milos Rajkovic

It appears to me that paranoia is the new-ish flavor of soma frozen yogurt. It seems to me that no matter which eye you focus with, left or right, you gotta swallow that brand of pill. Or maybe that is what they want you believe? Perhaps if we view with both eyes and add a third, some clarity can be gained. Maybe the fear that fuels a brand can be tarred, feathered, and chased out of town. Anyhow, the left/right paradigm and the constant repetition of their Conspiracies have me think of Eshu. Get yourself a hat and read.

via catherinesvehla

 This is one of the most famous stories about Eshu. I’ll be surprised if, after you’ve read it, you can’t think of at least one instance in which you’ve met this Trickster…

Once there were two men, fine friends who lived in the same village.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Toil and Trouble: Help Posthumously Pardon the Hanged Witches of Bideford

via Dana Matthews  Who Forted bideford witches1

A new campaign to make right the past wrongs of British witch hunts is gaining support from government officials, and you can help too.

British MP, Ben Bradshaw, has shown his support to posthumously pardon the last three women to be hanged for witchcraft in England, an act he says is “a stain” on British history.

The Witches of Bideford, otherwise known as Temperance Lloyd, Susannah Edwards and Mary Trembles, were hanged to death on August 25th 1682 after having been accused of performing acts of witchcraft against members of the town.

Temperance Lloyd was arrested in July 1682, after Thomas Eastchurch, the Bideford shoekeeper, accused Lloyd of being a witch. She was taken and held at the “chapel at the end of the bridge” until she was brought before the justices to defend herself against the charges.

Her charges were described as,

“…suspicion of having used some magical art, sorcery or witchcraft upon the body of Grace Thomas and to have had discourse or familiarity with the devil in the likeness or shape of a black man.”

Like most cases of witchcraft during that time period, the testimony was paranoid, suspicious, and mostly ridiculous.

Read the rest

Continue Reading