Tag Archives | Parenting

Money Makes Parenting Less Meaningful

310px-K.V.Lemoh_(d.1910)._Parent's_Joy

Pic: “Parents’ Joy” by Karl Lemoch (PD)

According to this study, having a higher socioeconomic status makes parents value the experience of raising children, particularly so for women. In contrast, poverty is associated with an increased risk of child abuse.

Via EurekAlert!:

Money and parenting don’t mix. That’s according to new research that suggests that merely thinking about money diminishes the meaning people derive from parenting. The study is one among a growing number that identifies when, why, and how parenthood is associated with happiness or misery.

“The relationship between parenthood and well-being is not one and the same for all parents,” says Kostadin Kushlev of the University of British Columbia. While this may seems like an obvious claim, social scientists until now have yet to identify the psychological and demographic factors that influence parental happiness.

New research being presented today at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) conference in Austin offers not only insight into the link between money and parental well-being but also a new model for understanding a variety of factors that affect whether parents are happier or less happy than their childless counterparts.

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Florida “Psychic Nanny” Helps Children With Paranormal Abilities

Can you afford NOT to give your child the advantage of a nanny who will cultivate their sixth sense? The Mirror on a so-called “psychic nanny”:

Single mother Denise Lescano, from Florida, US, is a much needed support for parents of children who show worrying signs of having a sixth sense. Denise uses her psychic abilities to ‘speak to’ the spirits and instructs families on how to approach life beyond death.

Denise, who believes she has been psychic since the age of nine, said: “My biggest mission in life is to get rid of the fear around what I do. This is not a scary thing, this is a very healing and comforting thing.”

Often Denise is called to determine whether youngsters are seeing spirits or displaying signs of mental illness: “Sometimes the parents don’t know how do deal with their children’s abilities.”

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Canada’s First Child To Be Born With Three Parents On Birth Certificate

babyWill the two-parent default come to be regarded as a quaint relic of the twentieth century? Suppose that three-plus parents is superior? Via CBC News:

A Vancouver baby has just become the first child in British Columbia with three parents listed on a birth certificate. Three-month-old Della Wolf Kangro Wiley Richards is the daughter of lesbian parents and their male friend.

B.C.’s new Family Law Act, which came into effect last year, allows for three or even more parents. B.C. is the first province in Canada with legislation to allow three parents on a birth certificate, although it’s been achieved elsewhere through litigation.

“In the old days, we looked at biology and genetic connections. And that’s no longer true. We now look at the intention of the parties who are contributing to the creation of the child, and intend to raise the child. And that’s a really, really big shift.”

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How To Potty Train Your Child By Demonic Exorcism

demonic exorcismCould parenting difficulties be attributable to Satanic possession of your children? Top anti-demon website DemonBuster reveals:

We received the following email about a woman learning DELIVERANCE, and practicing DELIVERANCE on her young child:

“Well my baby boy has been difficult to potty-train. I would sit him in the toilet for a long time and nothing would happen. So I got really mad, sat him in the potty and told him he had to “go”. The baby started screaming and I got the idea that it was a demon. So I commanded it to manifest and give me his name. The baby continued screaming and saying: “You can’t make me, you can’t make me”. I insisted in the demon telling me his name, so the Holy Spirit said: “That’s his name, “you can’t make me”. I commanded it out. The baby had deliverance and he has been potty-trained since.”

Praise the Lord!

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Study: Parents Lie Frequently To Their Children To Control Their Behavior

And we wonder why grown-up society looks the way it does. BPS Research Digest reveals what you suspected:

We teach our kids that it is wrong to lie, even though most of us do it everyday. In fact, it is often our children who we are lying to. A new study, involving participants in the USA and China, is one of the first to investigate parental lies, finding that the majority of parents tell their children lies as a way to control their behavior.

Gail Heyman and her colleagues presented parents in the USA and China with 16 “instrumental lies” in four categories – lies to influence kids’ eating habits (e.g. “you need to finish all your food or you will get pimples all over your face”); lies to get the children to leave or stay put (“If you don’t come with me now, I will leave you here by yourself); lies to control misbehaviour (“If you don’t behave I will call the police”); and lies to do with shopping and money (“I did not bring any money with me today.”).

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Why We Should Take Fewer Pictures Of Our Children

Via the New York Times, David Zweig has a harrowing observation on the first generation of children raised under constant digital surveillance:

“I want to look at pictures on daddy’s phone!” I can’t recall when this entreaty started. I only know it has been repeated like a mantra nearly every day by my 3-year-old daughter for as long as I remember her being able to speak in sentences.

On the surface a child’s preoccupation with personal photos seems quite benign, or even beneficial. And yet I fear her photo obsession may hasten her self-consciousness to a degree that’s no longer constructive.

Our children’s lives are being documented to a degree never done before. I often have over 100 new pictures per month added to iPhoto on my computer. Like adults, kids often act differently when they know the camera is on. There’s a reason posed shots almost always seem so awkward and artificial compared with candid ones.

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Baby Drop-Off Boxes Spread Across Europe

The BBC on a burgeoning recession-era parenting technique — towns provide a box in which struggling parents may stick babies they are incapable of caring for:

Boxes where parents can leave an unwanted baby, common in medieval Europe, have been making a comeback over the last 10 years. Supporters say a heated box, monitored by nurses, is better for babies than abandonment on the street – but the UN says it violates the rights of the child.

There is a stainless steel hatch with a handle. Pull that hatch open and there are neatly folded blankets for a baby. The warmth is safe and reassuring. There is a letter, too, telling you whom to call if you change your mind.

Critics say that baby boxes are a throwback to the past when the medieval church had what were called “foundling wheels” – round windows through which unwanted babies could be passed.

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Can Feminists Be Good Mothers?

Via ScienceDaily:

What kind of mothers do feminists make? According to a new study by Miriam Liss and Mindy Erchull, from the University of Mary Washington in the US, feminist mothers endorse the importance of the time-intensive, hands-on parenting practices associated with attachment parenting — a child-centric parenting technique in which children’s needs are ideally met on the child’s schedule rather than the parent’s. Their work is published online in Springer’s journal Sex Roles.

Feminists are often portrayed in the media as anti-family and anti-motherhood and the stereotypical assumption that feminists are uninterested in caring for children has contributed to the backlash against the feminist movement.

Liss and Erchull looked at whether attachment parenting practices, specifically, are endorsed by feminist women to help sharpen the conversation about whether or not attachment parenting is actually an empowering or an oppressive way to parent. They were also interested in whether stereotypes about feminist parenting matched the reality…

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It Is Now Possible To Decode An Unborn Baby’s DNA

Writes Bonnie Rochman on TIME:

Researchers at the University of Washington have sequenced the entire genome of a fetus. The scientific advance could help detect certain diseases in the womb, but some experts worry that the trove of genetic information may prove more scary and overwhelming than useful.

Suspended in the blood of a pregnant woman — along with some added information from a dad-to-be’s saliva — lurks enough fetal DNA to map out an unborn baby’s entire genetic blueprint.

It may sound like something conjured by Jules Verne, but it happened at the University of Washington: a professor and his graduate student used DNA samples from the parents of a baby boy who was still in utero and reconstructed his entire genetic makeup from A to Z.

The account, published in Science Translational Medicine, takes prenatal testing to new heights, promising a motherlode of genetic information about a child who had not even been born — along with a corresponding trove of data that even experts don’t yet know how to interpret…

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Is America Autistic?

An interesting article I discovered from Hug the Monkey:

Donna Williams, a self-described “mad, autistic artist”— as well as a teacher, author and consultant — wrote an article for American Chronicle that boldly questions whether our technology-oriented, individualistic society is creating more infants with reactive attachment disorder and autism.

She writes,

Is possible that we’re living in an age where some pregnant mothers being so busy with cerebral, passive interactions with technology and its related increase in time use that they don’t have the range of movements, emotional experience, that it’d be conceivable some don’t develop the same full prenatal bonding with their child that may have been more common before the ’80s and ’90s?

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