Tag Archives | performance art

The Failed Smell Concert Of Sadakichi Hartmann

sadakichiMovies and music are filled with sight and sound, but when will humanity master the expressive and exploratory power of the other senses? The Believer on an ill-fated pre-Surrealist attempt to transport a theater full of people to Japan via a series of perfumes projected by fan:

In the fall of 1902, when he was around thirty-five years old, the papers announced that Mr. Sadakichi Hartmann, the eccentric art critic, would present a short performance entitled “A Trip to Japan in Sixteen Minutes.” The piece was described as a “melody in odors.”

The turn of the twentieth century saw a flurry of sense experimentation. The color organ was patented in 1895, an instrument with colored panels that lit up and changed in time to music. A few years later, one of the first electric organs, the Telharmonium, would have its debut in a specially built concert hall in New York.

The perfume concert was the featured event on a bill of a casual Sunday pop, held at the enormous entertainment complex known as the New York Theatre.

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Pussy Riot On Their ‘Feminist Virus Infecting Your Thoughts’

pussy riotVia the New Statesman, Laurie Penny speaks with members of Pussy Riot who are non-jailed, but on the run from the law, about the meaning of their subversion:

When we meet in a secret location in central London, they make it clear that this interview is on condition of anonymity. The Russian punk-feminist protest group, two of whose members are currently travelling the world, raising support for their band-mates in prison, are wanted by their government. It will be illegal to read or share this article in Russia.

Since the trials, a smorgasbord of new legislation, informally known as the Pussy Riot laws, have been put into place in Russia to clamp down on the group and anyone who might try to imitate their art-protests. You can’t cover your face in public. Distribution and discussion of Pussy Riot’s protests is strictly forbidden. People have been prosecuted for making t-shirts with their image.

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DisinfoTV: The Voluptuous Horror of Kembra Pfahler

Diggin’ in the crates once again, in this segment of our old TV series we meet New York art maverick Kembra Pfahler: glam rocker, wrestler, Calvin Klein model, and mastermind behind the legendary freak show “The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black,” she blurs the line between life and art, pleasure and pain, and terror and beauty.

Taken from DisinfoTV on DVD, available now at: http://bit.ly/V01W7T

Subscribe to Disinformation’s YouTube channel: http://goo.gl/aHTcz

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Brian Butler Performs Aleister Crowley’s ‘Bartzabel Working’ Ritual

Witness the spirit of Mars summoned three weeks ago in Los Angeles in haunting and beautiful fashion, as Butler invokes forces I would be scared to tamper with:

L&M Arts presents The Bartzabel Working, a performance by filmmaker and artist Brian Butler, on December 4th, 2012. Based on a ceremonial evocation of the spirit of Mars, first written and performed in London in 1910 by the famed British occultist Aleister Crowley, the ritual later became part of Los Angeles history in 1946 when Jack Parsons conducted his own version of this rite with the intention of placing a Martial curse on a pre-scientology L. Ron Hubbard.

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‘Surveillance Camera Man’ Trolls Seattle

Pure obnoxiousness or consciousness-raising performance art? In a series of videos dubbed ‘Surveillance Camera Man,’ an unseen and anonymous individual strolls the streets of Seattle filming people with a camera for no apparent reason, eliciting furious responses. Is the goal to force us to acknowledge that we are constantly being surveilled in this very manner, although both the recording mechanisms and the persons on their opposite ends are typically concealed?

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Bombing London With Poetry

This past June, the Chilean arts group Los Casagrande dropped more than 100,000 poems, printed on scraps of paper, from a helicopter above central London in a performance titled the Bombing of Poems. They have done the same in Warsaw, Berlin, and Santiago — all cities which have been bombed during wartime.

Local government approved of the Bombing of Poems as a jubilant spectacle anticipating the pomp of the Olympic festivities to come, but the stunt’s meaning may be more ambiguous. Was the poetry drop an emergency measure in an era in which funding the arts has been deemed no longer possible, and the metropolis is dominated by finance? Is it a commentary on the blanketing of the city with propaganda?

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