Tag Archives | Peru

A Rock With Guts: The Pyura Chilensis


The wild looking “living rock with guts” is actually called Pyura chilensis and resides off the coast of Chile and Peru. Apparently locals like to eat it in stew.

Jess Zimmerman at Grist has more information:

The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare element called vanadium. Also, it’s born male, becomes hermaphroditic at puberty, and reproduces by tossing clouds of sperm and eggs into the surrounding water and hoping they knock together. Nature, you are CRAZY.

This odd reproduction process is called “selfing.” Read more here.

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Girl Possessed by the Devil Through Ouija Phone App


Locals in Peru believe an 18-year-old girl has been possessed by demons after using a Ouija Board phone app.

Michael Morrow via News.com.au:

According to friends, who spoke to local media, she’d been spending time with them at the weekend when they decided for a bit of fun to try and communicate with the spirit world.

After she went home, her parents noticed she seemed to be unwell and eventually called an ambulance when they saw her convulsing and foaming around the mouth.

Trying to find out if she had been taking drugs or eaten something strange, they contacted the friends who told them about the Ouija board.

In a video, medics can be seen trying to restrain the young girl who is convulsing violently and struggling as she shouts “666” followed by “let me go, let me go”.

Read more here.

h/t Cult of Weird.

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How One Indigenous Woman Took On a Multinational Mining Corporation… And Won

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Sarah Lazare writes at Common Dreams:

For over three years, indigenous Peruvian farmworker Maxima Acuña de Chaupe has refused to allow a U.S.-based multinational corporation to turn her land into an open-pit gold mine, withstanding multiple violent eviction attempts by corporate and state agents.

On Wednesday, Acuña de Chaupe finally saw victory when a Peruvian appeals court struck down a lawsuit levied by the Yanacocha mine—which is 51 percent owned by Colorado’s Newmont Mining Corporation—that had sought to expel and imprison the family for “invading” their own land.

The ruling is an important win in a case that has become a rallying point for local resistance to multinational plunder.

In 1994, Acuña de Chaupe and her family built their home in Tragadero Grande in the region of Cajamarca next to the Blue Lagoon of Celendin. This lake was sought after for the building of the open-pit Conga gold mining project—an extension of the one at Yanacocha.

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Greenpeace Apologizes For Nazca Lines Stunt

Peru’s mysterious Nazca Lines were sullied this week by a promotional message from Greenpeace, meant to capture attention during the United Nations climate meeting in Lima. BBC News reports that the activist group now has its tail firmly between its legs:

Greenpeace has apologised for any “moral offence” it has caused, after a publicity stunt on the ancient Nazca lines in Peru.

Activists from the organisation placed a banner next to a figure of a hummingbird, carved more than 1,500 years ago.

They were hoping to increase pressure on UN negotiators currently meeting in Lima.

The Peruvian government said it would prosecute the activists who took part.

The ancient depictions of animals, including a monkey and a hummingbird that are etched into the arid plain of Southern Peru are a vital part of the county’s heritage.

Visits to the site are closely supervised – ministers and presidents have to seek special permission and special footwear to tread on the fragile ground where the 1,500 year old lines are cut.

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How to visit Ancient Sites – Mindfulness & Meditation

How to visit Ancient Sites – Mindfulness & Meditation


This is the first in a series of short articles highlighting the approach I use when visiting ancient sites. I regularly organize and co-host tours to many powerful ancient sites around the world. During my tours I have observed the different ways people interact with sacred space. On one hand we have mainstream tours with guides reciting dates and names over a microphone while the tour members wear headsets. At the other end of the spectrum we have people visiting ancient and sacred sites to meditate. After witnessing these different ways of interacting, I felt compelled to share the techniques I use. I hope my insights will help others to maximize their time on location.

Ancient ritual

Anyone that has visited a museum or studied books on ancient cultures will no doubt have run into two labels “ancient ritual” and “ceremonial purposes”, these labels among others are used to explain in very broad terms what archeologists believe our ancestors were up to.… Read the rest

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Ancient Peruvian Astronomy Lab Uncovered

So this is awesome: archaeologists have found an ancient astronomy lab where it’s speculated that ancient people would track star movement.

Peruvian archaeologists found carvings that depict the stars and have lasted thousands of years. Silvia Depaz/Andina/Peru This Week

Peruvian archaeologists found carvings that depict the stars and have lasted thousands of years. Silvia Depaz/Andina/Peru This Week

via International Business Times:

Archeologists have stumbled upon a site where ancient people observed the stars thousands of years ago in Peru, a country famous for using drones to help uncover and map archeological treasures, as Reuters reported.

Excavators working on a complex at Licurnique, in the country’s northern region, have uncovered evidence of an “astronomical laboratory,” that dates back between 3,500 and 4,000 years, according to Peru This Week.

“Astronomical [observations] were engraved on a flat-surface rock, which were used to track stars,” its report said. It added that the petroglyphs were likely used in forecasting rain and weather patterns to help farmers. “It is worth exploring without a doubt.”

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Fake Birth Control in Peru

The organization, Prosalud Interamericana, worried that emergency contraception pills being sold in Peru were not, in fact, birth control pills at all. They investigated and what they found was disturbing: 1 out of 4 pills was a generic antibiotic.

A split dose of two emergency contraceptive pills (most are now provided as one single-dose pill). [photo by Anka Grzywacz]

A split dose of two emergency contraceptive pills (most are now provided as one single-dose pill). [photo by Anka Grzywacz]

via Popular Science:

As a traditionally Catholic country, Peru has been slower than most to accept contraceptives. Over the past decade, most citizens’ ideology has gradually stretched to accommodate the need for birth control, but emergency contraception (AKA the “morning after” pill) is still highly controversial in Peru. Although some question the pill on moral grounds, others are starting to question it based on sinister scientific findings: some of the pills are not the pill.

With a growing number of “verified” emergency contraceptives being registered in Peru over the past few years, leaders of Prosalud Interamericana, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about sexual health, became suspicious that some of the birth control being sold in Peruvian pharmacies was not the pill described on the packaging.

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Illuminating the Darkness in Shamanism

7613489930_9aca4bd68b_bThe starry-eyed fascination with South American shamanism in the spiritual counter-culture is beginning to shift towards a more grounded, realistic perspective. Aurelia Hunter tells a personal tale of Q’ero shaman mistreating her when she was seeking a mentor.

via Teaching and Broken Trust | Reality Sandwich

It’s the beginner’s mind full of childlike curiosity that keeps us humble and fuels our evolution. However, I have also discovered that seeking too far outside of our own inner wisdom can cause a willingness to give away one’s own power. At the start, I could not comprehend that the true teacher would appear the moment I stopped seeking. So I am sharing a story of falling into the illusion that we have to be with certain teachers of particular backgrounds and in certain “power spots” to receive the appropriate energy transmissions to become shamans, medicine women, and other labels of the spiritual walk. I would like to acknowledge that this can be advantageous as well as dangerous.

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Ancient Peruvians Practiced Brain Surgery

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Picture: Danielle Kurin, UCSB (C(

Some of you may be waking up with a terrible hangover today. If so, the sensation of someone drilling a hole in your skull without anesthesia may not be too hard to imagine.

…Evidence shows that healers in Peru practiced trepanation — a surgical procedure that involves removing a section of the cranial vault using a hand drill or a scraping tool — more than 1,000 years ago to treat a variety of ailments, from head injuries to heartsickness. And they did so without the benefit of the aforementioned medical advances.

Excavating burial caves in the south-central Andean province of Andahuaylas in Peru, UC Santa Barbara bioarchaeologist Danielle Kurin and her research team unearthed the remains of 32 individuals that date back to the Late Intermediate Period (ca. AD 1000-1250). Among them, 45 separate trepanation procedures were in evidence. Kurin’s findings appear in the current issue of the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

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