Tag Archives | Philip K. Dick

Sci-Fi Master Philip K. Dick Comes to TV

Earlier this year Amazon Studios teased the forthcoming Philip K. Dick TV series “The Man In The High Castle” at San Diego Comic Con. Now it’s about to launch, this Friday, November 20th, and the Wall Street Journal ponders why it took so long for Dick’s pantheon of work to make it to television:

Thirty-three years after his death, Philip K. Dick, the mad genius of science fiction, has finally come to television.

Mr. Dick’s stories of shifting realities, frayed perceptions and what it means to be human have been the source of at least 11 film adaptations such as “Blade Runner” and “Total Recall.” This fall, his work is being adapted for TV for the first time. “The Man in the High Castle,” a series based on his 1962 novel, makes its debut Friday on Amazon Prime. “Minority Report,” a TV sequel to the 2002 film based on one of Mr.

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Pulling the Cosmic Trigger: The Contact Experiences of Philip K. Dick & Robert Anton Wilson

robertantonwilson.jpgOur old friend Kenn Thomas’s Steamshovel Press has an exclusive essay by AK Wilks on the similarities between the contact experiences of two of our favorite writers, Philip K. Dick and Robert Anton Wilson:

This article will look at some of the similarities between the contact experiences of two American writers, Philip K. Dick and Robert Anton Wilson. In the 1973-1974 time frame, both would have unusual experiences that they thought could be contact with an extraterrestrial civilization. Or some undefinable something that wanted them to think it was extraterrestrial. And as incredible as it sounds, some of their experiences are confirmed by other people, and include verified transmission of knowledge that it seems they could not have obtained from any human source. We will also look very briefly at some other possibly related contact experiences involving musician and cultural icon John Lennon, researcher into human-dolphin communication and consciousness Dr. John Lilly and the Swiss scientist and inventor of LSD Dr.

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Amazon Debuts Philip K. Dick’s ‘The Man in the High Castle’ Series by Ridley Scott

Hey Dick-Heads, are you excited for the The Man in the High Castle? Amazon Studios has released a new teaser in advance of the debut of the first two series episodes at San Diego Comic Con on July 10th (if you can’t get to San Diego, EW is going to stream the event live):

Based on Philip K. Dick’s award-winning novel, and executive produced by Ridley Scott (Blade Runner), The Man in the High Castle explores what it would be like if the Allied Powers had lost WWII, and Japan and Germany ruled the United States. Starring Rufus Sewell (John Adams), Luke Kleintank (Pretty Little Liars) and Alexa Davalos (Mob City), the series results from the Amazon Studios one hour pilot, which you can access here if you subscribe to Amazon Prime.

Dick set The Man in the High Castle in 1962, fifteen years after the end of a fictional longer Second World War (1939–47).… Read the rest

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James Joyce — Modern Psychonaut

Bobby Campbell (CC BY 2.0)

Bobby Campbell (CC BY 2.0)

“I am convinced personally that Mr. Joyce is a genius all the world will have to recognize.”
– Aleister Crowley, The Genius of Mr. James Joyce

“Joyce’s prose prepared me to enter psychedelic space.”
– Timothy Leary, FLASHBACKS

“(Finnegans Wake is) about as close to LSD on the page as you can get…”
– Terence McKenna, Surfing on Finnegans Wake

“If you’ve never had a psychedelic, reading Joyce is the next best equivalent.”
– Robert Anton Wilson, RAW Explains Everything

“I have read Finnegans Wake aloud at a time when takers of LSD said, ‘that is JUST LIKE LSD.’ So I have begun to feel that LSD may just be the lazy man’s form of Finnegans Wake.” 
– Marshall McLuhan, Q & A

“Someday I’m going to get my article published; I’m going to prove that Finnegans Wake is an information pool based on computer memory systems that didn’t exist until centuries after James Joyce’s era; that Joyce was plugged into a cosmic consciousness from which he derived the inspiration for his entire corpus of work.Read the rest

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Philip K. PreDICKtions


In 1981, Philip K. Dick seemed to cast himself as one of the Precogs from Minority Report, when he offered a list of his own prognostications to be published in the collection Book of Predictions. Here’s what PKD saw when he stared into the crystal ball courtesy of the PKD Otaku fan zine, issue number 11, 2003…

The Soviet Union will develop an operational particle-beam accelerator, making missile attack against that country impossible. At the same time the U.S.S.R. will deploy this weapon as a satellite killer. The U.S. will turn, then, to nerve gas.
The U.S. will perfect a system by which hydrogen, stored in metal hydrides, will serve as a fuel
source, eliminating a need for oil.
By or before this date there will be a titanic nuclear accident either in the U.S.S.R. or in the U.S.,
resulting in shutting down all nuclear power plants.
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“How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart Two Days Later” by Philip K. Dick, 1978


Philip k dick drawing” by Pete Welsch from Washington, DC, USA – Philip K Dick. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.


Via Deoxy.org

by Philip K. Dick 1978

First, before I begin to bore you with the usual sort of things science fiction writers say in speeches, let me bring you official greetings from Disneyland. I consider myself a spokesperson for Disneyland because I live just a few miles from it—and, as if that were not enough, I once had the honor of being interviewed there by Paris TV.

For several weeks after the interview, I was really ill and confined to bed. I think it was the whirling teacups that did it. Elizabeth Antebi, who was the producer of the film, wanted to have me whirling around in one of the giant teacups while discussing the rise of fascism with Norman Spinrad… an old friend of mine who writes excellent science fiction.… Read the rest

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Philip K. Dick was right: we are becoming androids

stephane (CC BY 2.0)

stephane (CC BY 2.0)

Via Jesse Walker at Boing Boing:

In Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the Philip K. Dick novel that inspired the film Blade Runner, a bounty hunter pursues a group of androids who have been posing as human beings. He is eventually arrested and accused of being an android himself. The officers bring him to what turns out to be a counterfeit police station run entirely by androids, not all of whom are aware that they aren’t human.

“What do you do,” one of the robocops asks him, “roam around killing people and telling yourself they’re androids?”

It’s a complicated situation. But then, androids play a complicated role in Dick’s fiction. On the most obvious level, they represent the inhuman and the mechanical: People have empathy and will, while robots are rigid and soulless. It’s a familiar division in science fiction, though some storytellers prefer to put other monsters in the androids’ place.

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Breaking Up the Narrative: the 2015 Philip K. Dick Film Festival

FilmFestivalDaniel Abella is the founder and director behind the Philip K. Dick International Film Festival, which just held its third annual event this January at Tribeca Cinemas, NYC. I spoke with him about Philip K. Dick’s ongoing, reality-bending influence on cinematic expression.

J: What compelled you to start a Philip K. Dick film festival?

D: I have been a big fan of Philip K. Dick since learning he was compared to Jorge Luis Borges by Ursula LeGuin. After reading VALIS, Ubik and The Divine Invasion, I found a writer of great depth approaching some modern day philosophers. Philip K. Dick represents a distinctive voice that speaks of a bygone era in science fiction where humanity is prized and valued. My first film feature The Final Equation(1) was inspired by Philip K Dick’s mind bending 2-3-74 experience of meeting an alien intelligence he called VALIS. Based upon the good reception of the film it occurred to me that other filmmakers may want a forum to express their ideas and stories.… Read the rest

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“The Man In The High Castle” Philip K. Dick Adaptation Finds Lead Actress


RAISE THE ALARMS. How did I not know this adaptation was happening in the first place?

via io9:

Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, which takes place in a world where the Axis won World War II, has found a lead for its new Amazon TV series. We’re just super happy this PKD book is finally getting an adaptation.

Deadline is reporting that Alexa Davalos (Clash of the Titans, Mob City) has been cast in the role of Juliana. For those of you unaware mthe Dick book takes place in 1962 in an alternate reality where World War II was won by the Axis powers; Germany and Japan occupy the United States, main character Juliana lives in the San Francisco which, like most of the West Coast, is now controlled by Japan. Meanwhile, the East Coast is controlled by Nazi Germany and the Midwest remains uncontrolled.

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Precognitive police

What could possibly go wrong? Color blind profiling? An excuse to shoot first and cover up later? A dystopian nightmare waiting to happen? What are your thoughts disinfonauts?

via aeonPP_image_Wiki

Predictive policing could help prevent crime. But do we want a future where computer oracles and spies track us from birth?

When a troubled young man named Adam Lanza stormed into Sandy Hook Elementary School and slaughtered 20 first-graders and six teachers in a small Connecticut suburb in December of 2012, a shroud of sorrow and confusion engulfed the United States and countries all over the world. Why were all these children murdered, and why did someone so clearly disordered have access to so many guns?

I covered the mass shooting for the New York Daily News, and worked 14-hour days interviewing victims’ families, attending press conferences, and doing as much on-ground reporting as possible. The toughest part of the coverage came a week in, at the memorial for a six-year-old named Dylan Hockley.

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