Tag Archives | Philosophy

Alchemy, Soma, and the Eschaton with Ananda Bosman – FRM Podcast

Also available via Itunes.

In this installment, cosmologist Ananda Bosman joins the Free Radical Media crew for a highly informative talk on Entheogens and the history of their use, alchemy, and the current state of humanity and the relationship between the human realm and our interdimensional brethren. Bosman is a prolific writer and public speaker on many topics, including shamanism, science, and cosmology. You can visit his website here.

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Reengineering the Sacred: Five Ways to Hack God

vitruvian-e1440938484795

Gary Z. McGee via Fractal Enlightenment:

“Power is in tearing human minds to pieces and putting them together again in new shapes of your own choosing.” ~ George Orwell

The above quote is powerful because if you are not the one who is tearing your own mind to pieces and putting it back together again in the shape of your own choosing, then someone else probably is. It’s fine if you’re okay with who is doing the tearing to pieces – like if it’s Buddha, Jesus, Nietzsche, Gandhi, Thoreau, or even Orwell – as long as you’re the one who is putting it back together again. Stand on the shoulders of giants, but don’t become attached to their shoulder.

Use their shoulders as tools to see further than they did, and then reshape your mind according to the newfound perceptions. Just remember to continue taking the leap into the unknown in order to discover more and more giant’s shoulders to stand on.

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Why the World Does Not Exist

malevich_black_square

Kazimir Malevich, Black Square [1915]

Does the world itself exist? Do unicorns exist? German philosopher Markus Gabriel talks to four by three about his latest book Why the World Does Not Exist, tackling the big questions of ontology, why we should abandon metaphysics and why his theory of fields of sense can help us overcome the failures of post-modernism.


Even though you have argued that society has materially and spiritually benefited from attempting to grasp the world in its entirety, you deny that the world exists in your latest book Why the World Does Not Exist [Polity Press, 2015]. What motivated you to reject the concept of the world and why should we repudiate this profoundly familiar conviction? And how does your account differ from that of other philosophers, such as Heidegger or Wittgenstein?

Markus Gabriel: The idea that there is such a thing as the world in its entirety, in particular, very early on in Greek philosophy, comes to be understood as the view that there are overall principles/laws governing everything there is.… Read the rest

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The Argument from Abandonment and Suffering

Abandonment

This post originally appeared on Philosophical Disquisitions.

(Previous Entry)

The argument from abandonment and suffering is a specific version of the problem of evil. Erik Wielenberg defends the argument in his recent paper ‘The parent-child analogy and the limits of skeptical theism’. That paper makes two distinctive contributions to the literature, one being the defence of the argument from abandonment and suffering, the other being a meta-argument about standards for success in the debate between skeptical theists and proponents of the problem of evil.

I covered the meta-argument in a previous post. It may be worth revisiting that post before reading the remainder of this one. But if you are not willing to revisit that earlier post, allow me to briefly summarise. Skeptical theism is probably the leading contemporary response to the evidential problem of evil. It casts doubt on our ability to identify God-justifying reasons for allowing evil.… Read the rest

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The Inner Forms the Outer

Eddi van W. (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Eddi van W. (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Lee van Laer via Parabola:

Human beings are peculiar creatures. We can think; and it sets us apart from other creatures, who can think some (consider the honeybee) but not much. Thinking, over the last 10,000 or so years (a rough estimate,) mankind has occupied himself, in the disciplines of science and philosophy, with the question of what, exactly, we are. This is, indeed, the question at the core of all the great traditions as well, which presume a spiritual — or inner — nature that forms the outer one.

Lo and behold! We are nothing like what we think we are; and even what we think is formed in different ways than we think it is. Scientists, investigating the question of the microbiome, that is, the billions or even trillions of tiny microorganisms that live in our bodies, have finally come to the realization that we form a holobiont: that is, we are not individuals, single entities, at all, but a collection, a community, of many organisms.

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Does ‘Divine Hiddenness’ Belong to Theists or to Atheists?

Josh Cowan Photography (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Josh Cowan Photography (CC BY-NC 2.0)

J. L. Shellenberg writes at OUPblog:

Theistic literature is full of references and allusions to a self-concealing deity. The psalm writer whose poems are included in the Hebrew Bible regularly calls out, in alternating notes of perplexity, impatience and despair, to a God whose felt presence apparently seemed frustratingly inconstant. But he or she still assumed that God was there.

Something similar is true in the rest of the Bible, and indeed across most of western religious history. Take the notion of a ‘dark night of the soul’ associated with Saint John of the Cross. The medieval Spanish mystic was talking about the mysterious ways of operating of a divine reality in relation to human beings who seek God. Apparently he was not in doubt at all about whether such a being belonged to reality in the first place.

But recently things have changed.

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A World Without Why

the world map time B&W

In which world do we live? Does the world suffer from ingrained relativism and nihilism or is it imbued with meaning after all?

Philosopher Raymond Geuss talks to four by three about his latest book A World Without Why, why clarity and order can be functions of repression, constructive versus radical criticism, the meaning of life and the role of art within philosophy.


Our world, you suggest in your latest book A World Without Why, is not one, which is ‘in order’, but one, which seems characterized by instability, insecurity, unintelligibility and uncertainty. Could you expand on what vision of the world this gives us? Is it intended to be a substantive claim or more of an exaggeration prompting critical reflection?

Raymond Geuss: At the beginning of The German Ideology, Marx writes that in the future there will only be one science: the science of history. If you look at the history of the human species, it seems reasonable to assume that human beings have generally been confronted with a world that did not immediately reveal itself to them in its true shape and also did not automatically satisfy their needs.… Read the rest

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How do you learn to think?

Ian Sane (CC BY 2.0)

Ian Sane (CC BY 2.0)

This was taken from William Deresiewicz’s 2010 lecture “Solitude and Leadership.”

If you want others to follow, learn to be alone with your thoughts.

Let’s start with how you don’t learn to think. A study by a team of researchers at Stanford came out a couple of months ago. The investigators wanted to figure out how today’s college students were able to multitask so much more effectively than adults. How do they manage to do it, the researchers asked? The answer, they discovered—and this is by no means what they expected—is that they don’t. The enhanced cognitive abilities the investigators expected to find, the mental faculties that enable people to multitask effectively, were simply not there. In other words, people do not multitask effectively. And here’s the really surprising finding: the more people multitask, the worse they are, not just at other mental abilities, but at multitasking itself.

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The Synchronicity Movie “Time Is Art”

Alex_Grey_Gaia

The elements of the painting “Gaia” by Alex Grey are discussed with him in the film. Notice the Twin Towers on the right with a plane directly above it, all the smoke and the tree on fire. It was painted prior to 9/11. Synchronicity?

The Synchronicity Movie is a documentary film about an atheist who discovers that there is more than what we can see with our 5 senses. Hello friends, talk about strange things and Synchronicity right? As some of you know I get contacted by many people because of my writing. Readers, magazines, radio, TV, filmmakers and in this case NYC filmmaker Katy Walker. Yes, she read my article “Synchronicity and the Secret of the Co-creator,” said she really loved it and posted it at the site for her NEW Docu-Movie “Time is Art.” Although the film has been shot, it won’t be released until 11/11/15 waiting on final production.… Read the rest

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