Tag Archives | Philosophy

Rolling Balls through the Mind: On the Virtues of Laziness

I could have a job, but am too lazy to choose it;

I have got land, but am too lazy to farm it.

My house leaks; I am too lazy to mend it.

My clothes are torn; I am too lazy to darn them.

I have got wine, but I am too lazy to drink;

So it’s just the same as if my cup were empty.

I have got a lute, but am too lazy to play;

So it’s just the same as if it had no strings.

My family tells me there is no more steamed rice;

I want to cook, but am too lazy to grind.

My friends and relatives write me long letters;

I should like to read them, but they’re such a bother to open.

I have always been told that Hsi Shu-yeh

Passed his whole life in absolute idleness.

But he played his lute and sometimes worked at his forge;

So even he was not so lazy as I.… Read the rest

Continue Reading

Listen- Why You Have Heroic Potential and Shouldn’t Fear Shape-Shifting Lizards, The Illuminati, ISIS or Ebola.

Via Midwest Real

Fellow Disinfonaut, Author and pal, Gabriel D. Roberts joins the podcast! 

“You as you know yourself are not the final term of your being. You must die to that, one way or another… Life is always on the edge of death, always. One should lack fear and have the courage of life. That’s the principle initiation of all heroic stories.” – Joseph Campbell. 

ITUNES  STITCHER DOWNLOAD
IMG_6074As the great Joseph Campbell so beautifully points out, you my friend, are goddamned hero.

I know that’s weird to say, let alone admit to yourself. It seems ostentatious, self-aggrandizing and ridiculous. However, it’s totally true.

We lose sight of what it is that each and every one of us is charged with just by being alive– We’re born, we do our best on this planet, decade after decade, then die. It’s a positively gargantuan task in and of itself that shouldn’t be diminished.Read the rest

Continue Reading

Carl Jung: In Defense and Critique

Mandala on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

From Modern Mythology

Much has been said about Carl Jung over the years, and despite the fact that many now in psychiatry and even some therapists seem to find him irrelevant, the amount that has been written about his ideas belies this claim. So much as is possible in a short article, I would like to consider both his contribution as well as provide a possible critique of some of his thought. Through that I hope to highlight the value of relating to symbols as psychological facts.

I think it best to begin with a psychological event that Jung himself considered important enough to mention in at least two of his published works. (Man and His Symbols and Memories, Dreams and Reflections.) This was a reoccurring dream he apparently had for some time, and we might turn some of his own approach toward it, though not nearly as thoroughly as there is only one point I’m looking to get at, rather than building an individual’s personal mythologywhich is the means by which Jungian psychology can effectively get its teeth as something more psychological and less merely analytic.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

Art Now: What is Art?

“President Leon Botstein of Bard College steps boldly into the fray to answer one of the most enduring human questions: What is art? This discussion spills over into debates about art’s value to society —- whether access to the arts is right as basic as education or health care, and whether it should be assessed and supported by government or left to the “invisible hand” of the free market. President Botstein explains why it is essential to ask these questions and offers a sturdy basis for evaluating them. He goes so far as to suggest that engaging with art can give our lives meaning and purpose.”

Read the rest

Continue Reading

The Hijacking of Philosophy

By dakine kane via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

By dakine kane via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via Things That Shouldn’t Still Exist:

By my estimate, the majority of people who begin reading this are already of the opinion that philosophy is little more than a tedious form of mental masturbation, and worse, almost entirely useless.  My response:  I must sadly agree.  On the other hand, I only concede under the assumption we are speaking about 98% of the philosophy you learn in school and that most supposed “philosophers” choose to focus on.  Therefore, if you think philosophy sucks and has little bearing on anything real, I don’t blame you.  However, do read on as I would like to explain how it has been hijacked over the last 50 years.  In particular, the modern connotation of the word “philosophy” seems to largely exclude it’s most useful facet:  ethical philosophy, or as I refer to it, personal philosophy.

Below is a brief history on the progression of my thought processes and how I came to give a shit about any of this:

I can remember back to when I first began to have thoughts of depth.  My parents moved us out of state between fourth and fifth grade, so not only was I friendless, but also suddenly in the lowest grade at a brand new school.  Before that, I had lots of friends and mindless social interactions, but unlike the elementary grades, middle school was full of cliques.

Read the rest
Continue Reading

An Interview with Bertrand Russell from 1960

If your Friday calls for some philosophical discourse, I’ve got your remedy. Check out this 13 minute interview between Bertrand Russell and Woodrow Wyatt from 1960.

After posting the debate between Norman Mailer and Marshall McLuhan, I decided to hunt for some more goodies. Some of you mentioned having seen the Mailer/McLuhan piece before. So if you know of anymore videos like that and you feel so inclined to share, let me know! I’m sure the Disinfo crowd will appreciate it.

Read the rest

Continue Reading

Alfred Hitchcock’s Definition of Happiness

H/T Brain Pickings

“A clear horizon, nothing to worry about on your plate. Only things that are creative and not destructive. That’s within yourself, within me I can’t bear quarreling I can’t bare feelings between people. I think hatred is wasted energy. It’s all nonproductive. I’m very sensitive. A sharp word said by say a person who has a temper if they’re close to me hurts me for days. I know we’re only human, we do go in for these various emotions, call them negative emotions, but when all these are removed and you can look forward and the road is clear ahead and now you’re going to create something. I think that’s as happy as I would ever want to be.”

Read the rest

Continue Reading