Tag Archives | Philosophy

Cell Phone Radiation Is Probably Cooking Your Brain and Balls (and What You Can Do About It)

mobilize

Via Midwest Real

Kevin Kunze is the filmmaker behind Mobilize, an investigative documentary exploring the negative long-term health effects of cell phone radiation. The film examines recent scientific research, follows national legislative efforts, and exposes the influence that technology companies have on public health.

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This is an unfortunate rabbit hole my friends, because I love me some technology. I’m constantly ranting about it, tweeting about it, or manipulating it in some manner. It’s certainly not lost on me that without it, this show and this site wouldn’t even exist in the first place. I’ll even go out on a limb and say that technology and the insatiable, uniquely human, desire to continually lift our circumstances is intimately intertwined with the destiny of mankind (if that’s a thing).

As Terence McKenna put it:

“Technology is the real skin of our species… We take in matter that has a low degree of organization; we put it through mental filters, and we extrude jewelry, gospels, space shuttles.

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Aristotle on Time

Darren Tunnicliff (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Darren Tunnicliff (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Aristotle’s The Physics:

Next for discussion is time. The best plan will be to begin by working out the difficulties connected with it, making use of the current arguments. First, does it belong to the class of things that exist or to that of things that do not exist? Then secondly, what is its nature? To start, then: the following considerations would make one suspect that it either does not exist at all or barely, and in an obscure way. One part of it has been and is not, while the other is going to be and is not yet. Yet time—both infinite time and any time you like to take—is made up of these. One would naturally suppose that what is made up of things which do not exist could have no share in reality.

Further, if a divisible thing is to exist, it is necessary that when it exists, all or some of its parts must exist.

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Aesthetics, Immanuel Kant & Imagination

Irving Guyer

Does an artist perceive or invent his creation? How does imagination relate to freedom, beauty and nature?
Paul Guyer talks to four by three about the relationship between aesthetics and morality in the work of Immanuel Kant, Hegel’s rejection thereof and Schopenhauer’s positive conception of the aesthetic experience.


four by three: A substantial part of your work as a philosopher has been in the field of aesthetics. What motivated you to start working on this discipline of philosophy?

Paul Guyer: In hindsight, three things.  First, I started taking classes with Stanley Cavell as a freshman at Harvard (his large humanities class, some of the material from which turned up forty years later in his last book, Cities of Words). Cavell did not teach any conventional aesthetics in that course, or at any time during my undergraduate and graduate years at Harvard, but his title was ‘Professor of Aesthetics and General Theory of Value,’ and that may have both piqued my interest and licensed the subject of aesthetics for me.… Read the rest

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Intoxicated Consent to Sexual Relations: A Map of Moral Claims

This was originally published on Philosophical Disquisitions.

Consent is moral magic. It transforms an impermissible act into a permissible one. But deciding when and whether to respect a particular token or signal of consent is an ethically fraught business. Can children consent to medical treatment? Can adults with early stage dementia consent to give away all their earthly possessions? Is a smile or a nod sufficient for consent? Is it possible to consent to something by doing or saying nothing? Can you consent to have something done to you while you are asleep, if you provided the consent in writing in advance? Questions of this nature abound.

One of the most contentious of all these questions has to do with the correct attitude toward consent to sexual relations that occurs when one or more of the parties to a particular sexual encounter are voluntarily intoxicated. To take a typical and all-too frequent case, suppose that Ann and Bob meet at a party.… Read the rest

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Is there a Self in Selfies?

Agnes Martin's Gabriel Still

What is the significance of taking a selfie? Philosopher Alexander García Düttmann explores the potential of the selfie as both a feature of the culture industry and as a creative act in the work of Walt Whitman and Agnes Martin.


Alexander García Düttmann at Four by Three Magazine:

The answer is probably: no, it is unlikely that there is a self in selfies. As one gives this answer, well aware that perhaps no one cares for the kind of self one is denying to the image called selfie, a faint echo makes itself heard, the echo of an aphorism Adorno coined in the 1940s. It reads: “In many people it is already an impertinence to say ‘I’.”[1]

But does it matter? Must one appeal to some deeper, or more authentic, sense of selfhood, to an I that escapes the selfie’s eye, and ridicule an expression that refers more to an act than to an entity, to the act of stretching out one’s arms, of using a prosthesis with a small and handy camera attached to its extremity and of catching a digital glimpse of oneself, a glimpse contained in, and forming on the surface of, the artifact’s screen, an image immediately available to viewing?… Read the rest

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Michael Garfield on Project Bring Me to Life

Selomon and Shantastic Shine interview Michael Garfield for episode #51 of the Project Bring Me to Life Podcast:

Michael Garfield is a writer, visionary artist, musician and philosopher. He writes for Globalish, an online news platform that explores the world of video and human conversation through the lens of non-separation and non-duality.

We speak with Michael about his background in writing, what type of articles he covers for Globalish, which includes a seeker’s path view at cultural futurism and literary critique of the artful video world.

Find more about Michael at here.

Interesting Articles by Michael on Globalish.com:

http://life.globalish.com/soul-mates-cell-mates-the-blessing-the-curse-of-other-people/

http://art.globalish.com/hot-chips-time-travel-shenanigans-in-the-koan-tastic-i-need-you-now-video/

http://art.globalish.com/how-new-yorks-projection-napping-turns-the-city-inside-out/

http://art.globalish.com/is-the-music-video-our-generations-tibetan-book-of-the-dead/

Link to the Jellyfish Painting we discuss in short:

https://michaelgarfield.myshopify.com/collections/2015/products/watermelon-tourmaline-medusa

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Surfing the Liminal Aether with Bruce Damer Ph.D

bruce-terence

Bruce Damer with Terence McKenna in 1999.

Via Midwest Real

Dr. Bruce Damer is a multi-disciplinary scientist and a (proud) woo-drenched renaissance man. He researches evolutionary biology, especially focusing on the murky questions surrounding the origin of life. Damer also designs asteroid-wrangling spacecrafts and is an expert in computer science who has spent decades researching emergent, lifelike virtual systems.

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Why is it that we’re always searching for someone to tell us answers? We have an obsession with experts, scientists, teachers — gurus of all sorts. As long as I can remember, I’ve been under the impression that learning and knowledge come from some sort of external source, but what if that’s entirely backward? 

What if all of the answers are right there inside of you, somewhere within your own deepest murk just waiting to be discovered? Perhaps great men are simply skilled facilitators of knowledge and learning, while the actual evolving and growth is wholly incumbent upon the individual.Read the rest

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Tantra, Martial Arts, and The Metaphysics of Pain

From the the Christian image of the crucifixion to statues of a skeletal Buddha, pain and suffering, and pushing beyond them, have been perennial themes in religion and spirituality. Both in the East and West — from the samurai to Freemasonry — practitioners have contemplated their own mortality, as part of their practices, reorienting themselves away from trivial personal concerns and toward, to borrow a term from the East, the “Way.”

Yet, today, we are increasingly concerned with comfort and security. Even spirituality itself is repackaged to reassure rather than to challenge practitioners. Offering rare insight, Craig Williams, author of Tantric Physics Vol I: Cave of the Numinous, elaborates on pain and its lessons in the martial arts and Tantra:

samurai

“Pain is one of the keys to unlock man’s innermost being as well as the world,” wrote Ernst Junger. “Whenever one approaches the points where man proves himself to be equal or superior to pain, one gains access to the sources of his power and the secret hidden behind his dominion.

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David Hume’s Argument Against Miracles (Part Two)

David Hume

Part One.

This post was originally published on Philosophical Disquisitions

This is the second part in my series of posts on David Hume’s argument against miracles. Though Hume’s argument is widely-discussed and widely-referenced, it has been subject to a number of uncharitable interpretations. This, at any rate, is Robert Fogelin’s contention in his excellent little book A Defense of Hume on Miracles, which is the primary source for this series of posts.

In the previous entry, I explained some of the background to Fogelin’s book. He believes there are two major misreadings of Hume in the literature. The first holds that Hume thinks that no evidence could possibly suffice to establish the historical occurrence of a miracle. The second holds that Hume thinks that an a priori argument suffices to make the case against miracle claims. Both readings are in error.

The reason they are both in error has to do with the structure of Hume’s work Of Miracles.… Read the rest

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David Hume’s Argument Against Miracles (Part One)

David Hume

This post was originally published on Philosophical Disquisitions.

If you read a book by an alleged eyewitness to a miraculous event, should you believe that the event occurred? Hume’s argument against the plausibility of believing in miracles on the basis of testimony is probably the most famous contribution to the philosophical debate on this question. It is also the most hotly contested and debated. Some people think that Hume’s argument is eminently reasonable, a shining example of his insatiable common-sense approach to philosophical argument. Others are less persuaded, believing Hume’s argument to be either question-begging or an ‘abject’ failure.

I’ve been dimly aware of these debates for a number of years. And I used to think I had a reasonable grasp of what Hume had to say. Indeed, in my recent post on Arif Ahmed’s case against the resurrection, I noted that Ahmed’s first argument is, to all intents and purposes, a reformulation of Hume’s.… Read the rest

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