Tag Archives | Photography

The World Isn’t Worth Saving if the Price is a Tear of an Innocent Child

Edward Goldman on Richard Ross’s photographs of the U.S. juvenile incarceration system at Art Talk:

If someone told me that I would have a reason to bring up the names of Pope Francis and Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in the same sentence, I would have highly doubted it. But, here it is. A New York Times Editorials article, “Justice Kennedy on Solitary Confinement,” talks about Justice Kennedy addressing “what has become one of his most pressing concerns: America’s broken criminal justice system in general, and prolonged solitary confinement in particular.” (June 20, 2015) Making his point, Justice Kennedy quotes the Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky: “The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.”

Richard Ross, "Juvenile in Justice," Image of Justice. 2012

Richard Ross, “Juvenile in Justice,” Image of Justice. 2012

A few years ago, Pope Francis surprised many of us by bringing up the name of Dostoyevsky, as well. In an interview, the Pope claimed him as his favorite writer.

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Sony Action Cam’s ‘Never Before Seen’ Movies

Sony Action Cam has teamed up with a diverse range of filmmakers, artists and influencers to create a series of new films celebrating the “never before seen”. Ranging from crafty experiments and audacious stunts to short documentaries, sports adventures and scripted short stories, the films celebrate creativity in all its forms and use Action Cams to provide unique new perspectives on the production process and the stories themselves.

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The Creature Foetus

 

The campaign launched with the debut of three films: “Picture Machine”, “Paperports” and “Creature”. Directed by Studio Nos, Charles Young and Ryan Dzierzek respectively, the variation between the three films is a good indicator of the campaign’s overall breadth. “Picture Machine” documents the construction of a reverse zoetrope, “Paperports” lets us peek into the work and process of Young’s intricate miniature paper architecture practice, and “Creature” tells the tale of a mutant reptile on the loose.

The campaign’s remaining films will be released gradually on Sony’s YouTube channel as well as the accompanying site.… Read the rest

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Malformed: Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospital

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Malformed: Forgotten Brains of the Texas State Mental Hospitaljust released in December, documents an obscure piece of history: the “Battle for the Brains” with stunning photography.

Hidden away out of sight in a forgotten storage closet deep within the bowels of the University of Texas State Mental Hospital languished a forgotten, but unique and exceptional, collection of 100 extremely rare, malformed, or damaged human brains preserved in jars of formaldehyde.

Decades later, in 2011, photographer Adam Voorhes discovered the brains and became obsessed with documenting them in close-up, high-resolution, large format photographs, revealing their oddities, textures, and otherworldly essence. Voorhes donned a respirator and chemical gloves, and began the painstaking process of photographing the collection. Desperate to know more about the provenance of the brains, Voorhes, together with journalist Alex Hannaford, traveled down the rabbit hole of the collection’s history.

Sifting through a century’s worth of university documents, the truth-seekers discovered that rival universities had bitterly fought over the collection.

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Nimoy’s Kabbalistic Photography

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

Photo by Leonard Nimoy

It was sad to lose Leonard Nimoy, but it’s wonderful to look back on the man’s productive creative life and feel gratitude for his gifts. An interesting point of focus in many of the remembrances I’ve seen is Nimoy’s work as a photographer. Some of Nimoy’s photographs connect directly to his spiritual life, but so does the character of Spock. Nimoy’s photos aren’t as well known as his acting, but the fact is that whether he was on a television screen, in front of a movie camera or working behind the lens to create his own still images, Nimoy was a mystic who grounded his creativity in the sky. Here’s what art critic and poet Donald Kuspit had to say about Nimoy’s and his art…

Nimoy is a gnostic mystic—a radical spiritualist, indeed, a spiritual rebel…I am suggesting that Nimoy’s fascination with the female body involves an element of temptation as well as transcendence.Read the rest

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Building an Artistic Community with the Warren Arts Center – Free Radical Media Podcast

In this episode, the Free Radical team talks with Adam, Carl, and James of the Warren Arts Center, an art collective based in Warren, OH, USA. We discussed their plans to build and nurture a vibrant artistic community, including fighting gentrification and navigating local economies and politics. We also talked Dada, photography, the meaning of Art itself and the ways in which a strong group of artists can help their community and society at large.

“The artist’s task is to save the soul of mankind; and anything less is a dithering while Rome burns. Because of the artists, who are self-selected, for being able to journey into the Other, if the artists cannot find the way, then the way cannot be found.” – Terence McKenna

You can contact our guests via ZENspeak Publications (Web and Facebook) and at ZENStreet Photography.

Free Radical Media can be reached via:
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Colin Batty’s Sci-Fi Reimagining of 19th Century Portraits

From peculiarum.com

“Hooked on Fishing” from peculiarum.com

From Colin Batty’s website:

Colin Batty is an artist from Manchester, England. He has worked on countless cool projects including Tim Burton’s Mars Attacks, [!!!] the Oscar nominated short The Sandman, Eddie Murphy’s The PJ’s, and many, many more. He sculpted the original Halcyon model kits of the Alien, the Predator, and the Queen Alien. He also has designed and sculpted for Critterbox toys. Colin has contributed to Freakybuttrue and the Peculiarium for many years and graces this site with his amazing work.

Batty has countless sci-fi portraits for sale (starting at $4) as either prints or originals. Here are some of my favorites:

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The Futuro Houses of 1960

via Atlas Obscura:

The Futuro House was designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen in the late 1960s. Made of new materials like plastic and manufactured to be portable and adaptable to diverse terrain with its raised legs, the capsule house was imagined as a ski chalet with a quick heating system. You entered through a hatch to an elliptical space with a bedroom, bathroom, fireplace, and living room. Suuronen soon saw its potential beyond the slopes, and through the Futuro Corporation built the lightweight houses as a prefabricated, compact housing solution adaptable for any corner of the globe.

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Steve Rainwater (CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Futuro House in Rockwall, TX as it appeared in April, 2003.
Steve Rainwater (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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Unsettling Post-Mortem Photographs from the Victorian Era

via Viral Nova [Please follow the link to see all of the photos]:

The Victorian Era was a pretty morbid time in human history. One of the most unsettling traditions of the era was the practice of post-mortem photography (that is, photographing the dead). By today’s standards, this is would be pretty taboo, but at the time it was seen as quite normal.

That doesn’t mean that seeing those pictures now makes them any less creepy, in fact it probably makes them even more creepy. Here are 21 of the most unsettling examples of Victorian post-mortem photography we could find.

1. Contrary to being creepy, these death photographs were meant to serve as mementos of the deceased loved one.

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7. Here, the dead girl on the end is being propped up with a special device.

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9.) Notice the odd position of the curtain behind the boy? It’s likely there was someone behind it holding the boy’s head up.

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