Photography



In advertising and window displays, companies invite us to step into a lifestyle which we may access by purchasing their products. Suppose someone took the message too literally? While visiting IKEA with…










Ray Lowry the Clash London CallingThe image of Paul Simonon smashing his bass on the cover of The Clash’s London Calling is one of the most iconic images in all of rock ‘n’ roll. While you can’t always judge a record by it’s cover, in this case, you can.

London Calling is a great record in a great looking package, but Marcus Gray’s new book  Route 19 Revisited: The Clash and London Calling is a different story. While the book’s cover – and its title – implies that this volume is an examination of the band’s 1979 release, and a critical analysis that would argue it’s place among rock’s best records, covers can be misleading.

This is actually much, much more…


Batcave Discovered!Holy Bat-Internets! Many thanks to the intrepid reporting by Cyriaque Lamar on io9.com. (Possibly a new Bat-Ally?) At least we are closer to determining the new villain in the anticipated sequel to The Dark Knight.

It’s that vile Searchmaster known as … The GOOGLER! Cyriaque Lamar writes on io9.com.

Batman’s secret hideout has been discovered using the magic of the internet, and surprisingly it’s not under Wayne Manor. No, it’s located on a US military base in Okinawa. Who’d have thunk?

Why does this building sport the Batman insignia? Says one Reddit user, “There are two squadrons of [F15s] here on Okinawa, the bats, which sport blue tail flashes, and the cocks, which sport red tail flashes.” That sounds perfectly logical. Perhaps a little too logical. I’m inclined to believe that that hangar hides a device more along these lines…


Statue of Liberty Hit By LightningVia Metro (UK):

This is the moment the Statue of Liberty was hit by lightning — and caught on camera by a photographer who waited two hours in a storm-hit New York City.

New Yorker Jay Fine apparently waited more than 40 years for the shot before braving the storm last month in Manhattan’s Battery Park City.

The 58-year-old photographer caught the incredible snap — but it was a rather arduous process capturing the perfect picture.

He said: ‘I had been watching weather reports so I knew a storm was coming and it just seemed like a great opportunity.

‘I was ready and waiting and took 81 shots before finally getting this one.

‘I was shocked when I realised what had happened.

‘It was pure luck really, a once in a lifetime opportunity. It’s the first photograph of its kind I have ever seen.’


If you notice a sleeping or vacantly-staring figure in an antique photograph, it might not strike you to wonder if the subject is even alive. In the 21st century, we rarely see photographs of the dead that are not connected with crime scenes or accidents; dead relatives are instantly removed to funeral homes, where their bodies are embalmed by well-paid specialists. The Victorians, however, were not so disconnected from death, and a common practice was to have portraits taken of the recently-deceased. In these post-mortem photographs, the dead may appear in coffins, but were also quite frequently arranged among family in lifelike poses. As it was a period of extremely high child mortality, images like the ones in this video were often the only keepsakes 19th century families had by which to remember their short-lived sons and daughters:




I can believe it’s real but can’t believe it’s stable. C’mon Russian town, where’s your Dept. of Public Works to take care of this stuff? From English Russia via Gizmodo, Jesus Diaz,…



The centerpiece of this month’s Vogue Italia is a 24-page fashion spread dedicated to the Gulf oil spill — that is, featuring models mimicking dying, oil-covered, beached animals. Nice as it is…





No Cell Phones!Rosa Golijan writes on Gizmodo:

We’ve discussed the legality of recording on-duty police officers in the past, but that was in the context of public streets. What if the officer you’re photographing followed you into your home — without just cause?

A man named Francisco Olvera found out what happens when he was arrested for “illegal photography” by an officer in Sealy, Texas:

Olvera says the trouble started when Alderete responded to a complaint of loud music coming from his home. In front of the home, Alderete asked Olvera to show identification and as Olvera walked into his house to get it, Alderete followed him in.

“Olvera did not believe that Alderete had the authority to enter Olvera’s residence and, therefore, took a picture of Alderete using his cell phone,” the complaint states.

Olvera claims that Alderete saw a can of beer on a kitchen counter, next to Olvera’s wallet, and immediately handcuffed him.