Tag Archives | Photography

Images of 19th Century Paris’s Hell-Themed Café

Manning Krull at Cool Stuff in Paris has posted some rare pictures of a Hell-themed café that was founded in late 19th century Paris.


Little is known about the establishment, which appears to have operated into the mid-20th century. National Geographic has this to say:

“A hot spot called Hell’s Café lured 19th-century Parisians to the city’s Montmartre neighborhood—like the Marais—on the Right Bank of the Seine. With plaster lost souls writhing on its walls and a bug-eyed devil’s head for a front door, le Café de l’Enfer may have been one of the world’s first theme restaurants. According to one 1899 visitor, the café’s doorman—in a Satan suit—welcomed diners with the greeting, “Enter and be damned!” Hell’s waiters also dressed as devils. An order for three black coffees spiked with cognac was shrieked back to the kitchen as: “Three seething bumpers of molten sins, with a dash of brimstone intensifier!”

Next door was a less interesting café called Le Ciel (Heaven). … Read the rest

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London Calling – Again

Ray Lowry the Clash London CallingThe image of Paul Simonon smashing his bass on the cover of The Clash's London Calling is one of the most iconic images in all of rock 'n' roll. While you can't always judge a record by it's cover, in this case, you can. London Calling is a great record in a great looking package, but Marcus Gray's new book  Route 19 Revisited: The Clash and London Calling is a different story. While the book's cover - and its title - implies that this volume is an examination of the band's 1979 release, and a critical analysis that would argue it's place among rock's best records, covers can be misleading. This is actually much, much more...
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Holy Bat-Internets! The Batcave’s Been Discovered in Okinawa Using Google Maps!

Batcave Discovered!Holy Bat-Internets! Many thanks to the intrepid reporting by Cyriaque Lamar on io9.com. (Possibly a new Bat-Ally?) At least we are closer to determining the new villain in the anticipated sequel to The Dark Knight. It's that vile Searchmaster known as ... The GOOGLER! Cyriaque Lamar writes on io9.com.
Batman's secret hideout has been discovered using the magic of the internet, and surprisingly it's not under Wayne Manor. No, it's located on a US military base in Okinawa. Who'd have thunk? Why does this building sport the Batman insignia? Says one Reddit user, "There are two squadrons of [F15s] here on Okinawa, the bats, which sport blue tail flashes, and the cocks, which sport red tail flashes." That sounds perfectly logical. Perhaps a little too logical. I'm inclined to believe that that hangar hides a device more along these lines...
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The Statue of Liberty Hit By Lightning

Statue of Liberty Hit By LightningVia Metro (UK):
This is the moment the Statue of Liberty was hit by lightning — and caught on camera by a photographer who waited two hours in a storm-hit New York City. New Yorker Jay Fine apparently waited more than 40 years for the shot before braving the storm last month in Manhattan's Battery Park City. The 58-year-old photographer caught the incredible snap — but it was a rather arduous process capturing the perfect picture. He said: 'I had been watching weather reports so I knew a storm was coming and it just seemed like a great opportunity. 'I was ready and waiting and took 81 shots before finally getting this one. 'I was shocked when I realised what had happened. 'It was pure luck really, a once in a lifetime opportunity. It's the first photograph of its kind I have ever seen.'
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Children of the Victorian Era, Post-Mortem

If you notice a sleeping or vacantly-staring figure in an antique photograph, it might not strike you to wonder if the subject is even alive. In the 21st century, we rarely see photographs of the dead that are not connected with crime scenes or accidents; dead relatives are instantly removed to funeral homes, where their bodies are embalmed by well-paid specialists. The Victorians, however, were not so disconnected from death, and a common practice was to have portraits taken of the recently-deceased. In these post-mortem photographs, the dead may appear in coffins, but were also quite frequently arranged among family in lifelike poses. As it was a period of extremely high child mortality, images like the ones in this video were often the only keepsakes 19th century families had by which to remember their short-lived sons and daughters:
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David Bowie’s Book Of One Hundred Archive Objects

1975 Photo by David Bowie using Kirlian Photograph Machine, Source: bowieNet.net

1975 Photo by David Bowie using Kirlian Photograph Machine, Source: bowieNet.net

David Bowie is shopping around a book of photos of 100 pieces from his archive. From bowieNet.net:

We still don’t want to give too much away just yet, suffice to say that David Bowie has been working on a book entitled Bowie: Object.

There’s no firm publishing date in place, but we can give you a little more detail.

Bowie: Object is a collection of pieces from the Bowie archive, wherein, for the first time, fans and all those interested in popular culture will have the opportunity to understand more about the Bowie creative process and his impact on modern popular music.

Bowie: Object features 100 fascinating items that give an insight into the life of one of the most unique music and fashion icons in history. The book’s pictorial content is annotated with insightful, witty and personal text written by Bowie himself.

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Pulitzer Prize Winning Photos Capture The War On Terror

Hicks1Can an army make war on a concept? Tyler Hicks’ photography exhibit Histories Are Mirrors: The Path of Conflict Through Afghanistan and Iraq, doesn’t offer any answers where the contradictions of the War on Terror are concerned, but his images chronicle the soldiers and civilians who’ve been cast in the almost-decade-long tragedy. Hicks’ vivid photos show markets and massacres, heroes and hostages, every image taking its place in a sweeping drama presided over by a smiling villain: Saddam Hussein.

In Histories Are Mirrors, Hicks, a Pulitzer-winning New York Times staff photographer, documents the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the early years of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, through 2004. Many of the wall labels offer only dates and locations, but the exhibit isn’t merely a timeline. Hicks’ best photographs capture the eternal features that crop up in the emotional landscape of wars everywhere: fear, pain, pride, rage, hubris, hope and hopelessness.… Read the rest

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This Image Is Not a Photoshop Trick

Broken Pole

I can believe it’s real but can’t believe it’s stable. C’mon Russian town, where’s your Dept. of Public Works to take care of this stuff? From English Russia via Gizmodo, Jesus Diaz, writes:

This is not a Photoshop. It’s not an optical trick. And it’s not an illustration. It’s just a simply great photo taken near the Linevo village, in the Volgograd region of Russia. A wild firestorm went through the village and its surroundings, destroying 80 houses. Nobody knows what was the origin, but at least the phone lines are still working.

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Facial Recognition Software To Go Public That Allows Identification from Online Photos

Computer software that can scan images and then check those results against online photos and video is soon to make a public debut. Needless to say, privacy advocates are concerned. Andy Bloxham writes in the Telegraph:

The program works by scanning the relative positions of the eyes, nose and mouth and claims to be accurate in nine out of 10 cases. It can then search the internet for further images of the same individual and, in tests, unearthed untagged photos which had not previously been seen by some of the people in them.

The managers of Face.com, which created the software, told the Sunday Times that 5,000 developers were already using it. Gil Hirsch, its chief executive officer, said: “You can basically search for people in any photo. You could search for family members on Flickr, in newspapers, or in videos on YouTube.”

Such software has previously been the domain of Governmental organisations such as the UK Border Agency or inside social networking platforms.

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Vogue’s Oil Spill Fashion Spread

vogue-italia-water-oil-spill-3The centerpiece of this month’s Vogue Italia is a 24-page fashion spread dedicated to the Gulf oil spill — that is, featuring models mimicking dying, oil-covered, beached animals. Nice as it is to see the fashion world engaging in real issues, spending thousands of dollars on a spread to sell luxury items to the rich may not be the most sensitive way of doing so. Via Refinery29:

There’s no denying that these images from the oil spill editorial in Vogue Italia’s August 2010 issue are beautiful. The 24 pages of Kristen McMenamy, shot by Steven Meisel, are realistic interpretations of images of injured, oiled animals that have inundated the news media since the Deepwater Horizon explosion in April. As beautiful and provocative as they are, we can’t help but feel uneasy. Creating beauty and glamour out of tragedy seems quite fucked up to us, not to mention wasteful and hypocritical, seeing as thousands of dollars of luxury clothing was flown in, and then subsequently ruined for the shoot.

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