Tag Archives | Politics

Captain America on Immigration

I think this is a perfect summation of America’s dysfunctional immigration system.

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Taken from Captain Vol 7 14 (credit to Imgur user Snowchill).

via Policy.Mic:

Why Cap’s words matter now: Congress will leave soon for its August recess, potentially leaving the crisis on the border with Mexico completely unresolved. With just hours left until the legislative branch leaves town until Sept. 7, the president’s requested $3.7 billion in emergency funding to deal with the crisis of unaccompanied child refugees fleeing to the U.S. from Central America has not been assigned. Obama’s legislation is quite likely dead in the water.

A competing House GOP-sponsored bill which funds spending through September may have a rocky road in the Senate. The Republican version has provisions designed to appeal to the anti-immigration crowd, like eliminating hearings for child migrants in order to speed their deportation. While Democrats consider those provisions a poison pill, it is still possible that most conservative opponents of immigration reform will decide the bill doesn’t go far enough.

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What Do Philosophers Do?

An inside look into the life of the modern day philosopher.

The School of Athens, by Raphael, depicting the central figures of Plato and Aristotle, and other ancient philosophers exchanging knowledge.

The School of Athens, by Raphael, depicting the central figures of Plato and Aristotle, and other ancient philosophers exchanging knowledge.

via The Atlantic:

The romanticized version of what it’s like to be a philosopher must be one of the most appealing careers possible: read great thinkers, think deep thoughts, and while away the days in a beautiful office, surrounded by books, an Emeralite lamp, a hot mug of coffee, and perhaps a cat curled up by your feet. For the very few, your profound thoughts could revolutionize whole fields, herald new political ages, and inspire generations.

Of course, for many, academic philosophy proves a disappointment—an endless slog to publish, the tedium and heartache of departmental politics, and a dismal job market that tends to  people to far-flung college towns, far away from family and friends.

So what is a budding philosopher to do?

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EPA to Host Four Public Hearings on Climate Change Reduction

mokestack of Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility waste-to-energy plant.

Smokestack of Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility waste-to-energy plant.

And yet another battle in the climate change arena.

via EcoWatch:

This week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will host four public hearings on its plan to reduce climate change pollution from power plants. The speakers list is already filling up. Physicians will outline the health hazards linked to climate change. Farmers will talk about the challenges of raising crops in the face of extreme weather. And governors and mayors will describe the benefits of attracting clean energy investment to their communities.

Many people will testify in favor of the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. This should come as no surprise considering 7 in 10 Americans view global warming as a serious problem and want the federal government to reduce the pollution that causes it, according to a recent ABC News poll.

But the hearings will also attract another group of speakers: representatives from the American Coal Council, Americans for Prosperity and other dirty industries.

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Should We Have the Right Not to Work?

This is the logo used for egalitarian/ equality beliefs. Similar to the well known anarchy "A", a capital "E" inscribed in a circle is used in political imagery to show a belief in the equality of different types of people.

This is the logo used for egalitarian/ equality beliefs. Similar to the well known anarchy “A”, a capital “E” inscribed in a circle is used in political imagery to show a belief in the equality of different types of people.

John Danaher examines Andrew Levine’s argument that the right not to work “is entailed by the fundamental principles of liberal egalitarianism.”

via Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technology:

Voltaire once said that “work saves a man from three great evils: boredom, vice and need.” Many people endorse this sentiment. Indeed, the ability to seek and secure paid employment is often viewed as an essential part of a well-lived life. Those who do not work are reminded of the fact. They are said to be missing out on a valuable and fulfilling human experience. The sentiment is so pervasive that some of the foundational documents of international human rights law — including the UN Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR Art.

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Kim Dotcom’s New Political Party

Kim Dotcom addressing a crowd by Peter Harrison.

Kim Dotcom addressing a crowd by Peter Harrison.

Kim Dotcom’s new political party, the Mana Internet Party, hopes to “abolish mass surveillance.”

via The Guardian:

Tech tycoon Kim Dotcom has told the Guardian that “governments want to engage in mass surveillance and have total citizen control”, before a crowd fundraising event for the Mana Internet party, the political party he founded to contest New Zealand‘s September 20 elections.

Dotcom also reiterated his promise that five days before the election, the world will “witness a moment of truth” at an event alongside Glenn Greenwald, the former Guardian journalist who broke the NSA revelations with Edward Snowden. “We’re about to make history”, he said.

The eccentric entrepreneur behind file-hosting site Megaupload established the Internet party in March 2014, which has merged with the Mana Party during the election campaign, led by Laila Harré.

Internet party candidates will take second, fifth and sixth places on the candidate list.

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Synopsis of Our Present Predicament: What the Future Holds

via chycho

refugees

In short, the main problem with our society is that our education system is designed to instill obedience, and it has done so extremely well. We have willingly consumed propaganda to the point where our hypnosis has turned us into servants of totalitarian regimes:

“The political philosopher Sheldon Wolin uses the term inverted totalitarianism in his book Democracy Incorporated to describe our political system. In inverted totalitarianism, the sophisticated technologies of corporate control, intimidation, and mass manipulation, which far surpass those employed by previous totalitarian states, are effectively masked by the glitter, noise, and abundance of a consumer society.”

Bill Hicks – JFK

Further information on the JFK assassination at: “Oswald, the CIA, and Mexico City”, and “The Death Of John Kennedy: The Media helped sell the lie of the lone assassin”.

We have allowed poverty and inequality to flourish by believing in Wall Street’s mantra, practicing accounting magic of indefinite growth, and normalizing scarcity based economics.

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Federal Judge Richard George Kopf Tells Supreme Court They Should STFU

Richard G. Kopf, District Judge

Richard G. Kopf, District Judge

Federal Judge Richard George Kopf runs a personal blog, “Hercules and the umpire,” and has some choice words for the Supreme Court’s decision on the Hobby Lobby case:

In the Hobby Lobby cases, five male Justices of the Supreme Court, who are all members of the Catholic faith and who each were appointed by a President who hailed from the Republican party, decided that a huge corporation, with thousands of employees and gargantuan revenues, was a “person” entitled to assert a religious objection to the Affordable Care Act’s contraception mandate because that corporation was “closely held” by family members. To the average person, the result looks stupid and smells worse.

To most people, the decision looks stupid ’cause corporations are not persons, all the legal mumbo jumbo notwithstanding. The decision looks misogynistic because the majority were all men. It looks partisan because all were appointed by a Republican.

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The Act of Killing (review)

“Behind every work of art lies an uncommitted crime”
The Act of Killing

Fiction can often get us closer to reality than the approach of non-fiction. Narratives so often conceal, and the very meaning of the word myth has been subsumed by this idea of the “narrative that is a lie.” But, as we’ve so often explored on this site, this isn’t the whole picture.

In fact, it’s deeply misleading. Because the reality we live most intimately inside is the world of our own narrative, it is through narratives that we can be brought closest to the prima materia, without ever being able to fully say what it is outside its own context. A narrative exists only on its own terms. The further you are removed from that, the less vital it is likely to be. The more removed, the more easy to use it as a tool of deception.… Read the rest

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How To Impeach A President

Pro-Impeachment anti-war protester 2007We haven’t had a good old fashioned presidential impeachment since the 20th century, so just in case y’all forgot, here’s how courtesy of Vox:

Last weekend, the South Dakota Republican Party voted to call for the impeachment of President Obama. It seems to be the first official adoption of impeachment as policy by a state GOP organization, but it’s the latest example that parts of the conservative base are yearning for it. Since Republican leaders aren’t on board, impeachment seems unlikely to actually happen unless some major new scandal emerges. But — just in case — here’s how the process actually works.

The Constitution says that the president can be removed from office for “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” But many have argued that the definition of “high crimes and misdemeanors” is really up to the House to decide. When Gerald Ford was House Minority Leader, he said, “An impeachable offense is whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history.” And as a practical matter, he’s absolutely right.

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Why The Tea Party Is About to Become Even Angrier

Picture: CometStarMoon (CC)

Picture: CometStarMoon (CC)

Here in Mississippi, voters usually have a choice between a conservative candidate and an even more conservative candidate. They usually get into mudslinging matches about who’s the “real conservative”. Even the democratic candidates. This last run-off election got pretty damned nasty, even for this neck of the woods. According to some people, it’s a sign of things to come.

In Mississippi on Tuesday, U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran defeated state Sen. Chris McDaniel in a runoff election to determine who would be the state Republican Party’s nominee for Senate in the extremely conservative state. Despite the fact that the two men were more or less indistinguishable on issue positions, the race was remarkably contentious and largely defined by dueling allegations of impropriety and fraud. Indeed, while non-conservatives may consider the differences between the so-called establishment and Tea Party wings of the GOP to be slight, the primary battle that reached its culmination last night is clear evidence that Republicans themselves strongly disagree.

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