Tag Archives | Pop Culture

Survivors of the Apocalypse

MARTIN WITTFOOTH — BABEL.  Some of the most beautiful, moving and relevant paintings of our time.

BABEL by New York based artist Martin Wittfooth is the new book featuring 124 pages of  masterful works spanning over five years (2009-2014).

Martin’s work is a rich narrative tapestry that celebrates animals as victors after an apparent apocalyptic event. “Animal apparitions trapped within theatrical atriums caught acting out scenes of good and evil, life and death.”

“Instinctive and purposeful, New York-based oil painter Martin Wittfooth conveys mention of the Masters while sifting through personal revelations, environmental phenomena and socio-political disturbances.” (Nocturne II featured in BABEL).

BABEL is a museum-grade publication documenting seven prolific solo exhibitions featuring large-scale oil paintings: De Anima (2014), Empire (2012), The Passions (2011), Gardens (2010), Tempest (2010), Babylon (2009), Sandcastles in the Tide (2008) and Melting Season 2006).

BABEL features written contributions by Marshall Arisman, Kirsten Anderson, Martin Wittfooth and Mark Murphy.… Read the rest

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The Nature of Mind and the Holographic Brain

Ardonik (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Ardonik (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Via War is a Crime

The purpose of this article is to provide evidence that strongly indicates that you are not your brain, or your body for that matter, and that the nature of mind, of memory, and of our brains may actually be vastly different than we have been lead to believe.

Since time immemorial, man has been fascinated by the mind, leading great thinkers from Hippocrates to Descartes to ponder the nature of mind with wonder. Fast forward to modern times and observe how the mind is still revered and is dominating our culture. We have a lot of firm beliefs about the nature of mind, and I believe the ego — our limited perception of ourselves — and thus human ignorance, is intricately tied in with these beliefs.

But the truth of the matter is that we only understand a fraction of the mind’s potential, i.e.

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‘South Park terrorist’ sues prison, claims it’s difficult to practice Islam behind bars

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Via NY Daily News:

A wannabe terrorist serving prison time for threatening the “South Park” creators is suing his jail for allegedly hindering his ability to practice his Muslim faith.

Zachary Chesser filed a civil complaint last month against the Federal Bureau of Prisons, claiming it made it difficult for him to “fulfill Islam’s religious obligations,” the Smoking Gun reported.

Islam requires regular group worship, which the prison only allows once a week, the 25-year-old said in the hand-written complaint.

Chesser said he has tried to connect with other incarcerated Muslims: He talks to a man on the floor above him from a shower drain, but the unusual communication is “physically painful, reeks of sewage and makes it very hard to hear,” he wrote.

Chesser was convicted in 2010 on terror charges after he threatened “South Park” creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone and tried to join a Somalian terrorist group.

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FAMILY LEXICON – Fred Stonehouse and Esther Pearl Watson Curated by Michela D’Acquisto

Antonio Colombo Arte Contemporanea MILAN is proud to present Family Lexicon, the exhibition of american artists Esther Pearl Watson and Fred Stonehouse, curated by Michela D’Acquisto.

The show proposes a new body of works intended to explore the family lexicon of the two artists, the labyrinth of sayings and terms typical of the intimate dimension of every family.

Fred-Stonehouse-Search-For-The-Finish

Fred-Stonehouse-Search For The Finish

Esther Pearl Watson’s confessional and distinctly naïve painting draw on the years of her very peculiar adolescence, spent tavelling between Italy and Texas, in the orbit of her father, an inventor of flying saucers made of cars’ motors and scrap parts.

Her memories unravel in the background of sleepy small towns and infinite Texas prairies, whose skies are always dominated by the strangely comforting presence of space shuttles: these are the double emblem of the relationship with her father, the first inspiring figure of her life, and with her own young daughter, who has learned since she was a child to associate Esther to her UFOs.… Read the rest

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Rupert Sheldrake on The Evolution of Telepathy

Via Rupert Sheldrake.org

My research on telepathy in animals, summarized in my book Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home and published in detail in a series of papers (listed below), led me to see telepathy as a normal, rather than a paranormal phenomenon, an aspect of communication between members of animal social groups. I see psychic phenomena as an extension of biology, which is why I, as a biologist, am interested in them. The same principles apply to human telepathy, and I have investigated little explored aspects of human telepathy, such as telepathy between mothers and babies, telephone telepathy (thinking of someone who soon afterwards calls) and email telepathy. I have designed several automated telepathy tests, some of which can be carried out through this website.

I think telepathy has evolved, like other biological abilities, subject to natural selection, and my lecture on the evolution of telepathy at Cambridge University is online here: Evolution of Telepathy .

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The Individual vs. the Goo

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

Kevin Dooley (CC BY 2.0)

Via War Is Crime:

“The people” is a convenient term for “every individual.” This has been lost in translation. It has been garbled, distorted, just as the proprietor of an old-fashioned carnival shell game distorts the audience’s perception with sleight of hand.

Are “the people” one group? Well, that’s the ultimate Globalist formulation.

However, from the point of view of the free individual, things are upside down. It is his power that is primary, not the monolithic corporate State’s. From his point of view, what does the social landscape look like? It looks like: the obsession to organize.

I’m not talking about organizations that are actually streamlined to produce something of value. I’m talking about organizations that plan more organization of life.

If you want to spend a disturbing afternoon, read through (and try to fathom) the bewildering blizzard of sub-organizations that make up the European Union.

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Musicians Who Died in 2014

Joe Cocker and the Grease Band performing at Woodstock.  Photo by Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell - Own work (own picture) (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Joe Cocker and the Grease Band performing at Woodstock.
Photo by Derek Redmond and Paul Campbell – Own work (own picture) (CC BY-SA 3.0)

via Ranker:

This list of famous musicians who have died in 2014 is a complete list of singers, songwriters, and performers who have gone to the great gig in the sky in 2014.

34. Joe Cocker
33. Ian McLagan
32. Bobby Keys
31. Jimmy Ruffin
30. Big Bank Hank
29. Wayne Static
28. Jack Bruce
27. Tyson Stevens
26. Joanne Borgella
25. Isaiah "Ikey" Owens
24. Mark Bell
23. Paul Revere
22. Robert Throb Young
21. Simone Battle
20. Michael Johns
19. Dick Wagner
18. Tommy Ramone
17. Johnny Winter
16. Bobby Womack
15. DJ E-Z Rock
14. DJ Rashad
13. Shane Gibson
12. Jesse Winchester
11. Big Glo
10. Jason McCash
9. Frankie Knuckles
8. Tim Wilson
7. Paco de Lucía
6. Franny Beecher
5.… Read the rest

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The dark web: what it is, how it works, and why it’s not going away

via Vox:

2014 saw the continued growth of the dark web, a collection of underground websites that allow people to engage in often-illegal activities beyond the reach of law enforcement. Here’s what the dark web is, how it works, and why it’s not going away any time soon.

What is the dark web?

The dark web is a general term for the seedier corners of the web, where people can interact online without worrying about the watchful eye of the authorities. Usually, these sites are guarded by encryption mechanisms such as Tor that allow users to visit them anonymously. But there are also sites that don’t rely on Tor, such as password-protected forums where hackers trade secrets and stolen credit card numbers, that can also be considered part of the dark web.

People use the dark web for a variety of purposes: buying and selling drugs, discussing hacking techniques and selling hacking services, trading child pornography, and so forth.

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Mining the Hive Mind: Implications Of Facebook Indexing 1 Trillion Posts

Mike Beauchamp (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Mike Beauchamp (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Via TechCrunch:

A whole wing of the Internet just got added to our collective conscience, like websites by Google or knowledge by Wikipedia before it.

 Yet the news cruised by with analysis focused simply on what Facebook’s new keyword post search does today. Yes, any post by you or any of your friends can now be dug up with a quick search from mobile. But I don’t think people realize how big a deal it is for tomorrow. Facebook just went from data rich to Scrooge-McDuck-swimming-in-a-tower-full-of data rich.

The ramifications for advertising, developers, and Facebook itself are tough to fathom. Our most vivid doppelgänger, our digital echoes can now be tracked. They don’t just say who we were, but where we’re headed, and what we’ll want next.

First, the trillion post index gives us group memory.Each person can only search stories from their friends and surrounding network, but Mark Zuckerberg recently said those all add up to over 1 trillion posts.

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