Tag Archives | Pop Culture

Alessia Iannetti – Penetrated by a Nocturnal Mysticism

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Photography by Eleonora Grasso

Artist’s Statement:

Alessia Iannetti was born in Carrara (Italy) in 1985 and graduated at the Academy of Fine Arts where she had the opportunity to study with the famous Artist and Professor Omar Galliani from whom she inherited the complex graphite on board technique as “Estigmate” of the most fascinating contemporary illustration, with its cinematographic views and close ups made of blacks and whites and infinite variations of gray, that give back to the monochrome and the drawing the excellence of intensity.
 As a reply to modern conceptual language, no more so deeply contemporary, Alessia Iannetti, already placed between the most interesting artists from New Pop and New Surrealism international scene, offers a high cultured Art, which is aware of its figurative turn and proudly follows the ironical and surrealistic aspects of Neoclassicism movement.

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The Good, The Bad and The Robot: Experts Are Trying to Make Machines Be “Moral”

I, Robot coverCoby McDonald Via California Magazine:

Good vs. bad. Right vs. wrong. Human beings begin to learn the difference before we learn to speak—and thankfully so. We owe much of our success as a species to our capacity for moral reasoning. It’s the glue that holds human social groups together, the key to our fraught but effective ability to cooperate. We are (most believe) the lone moral agents on planet Earth—but this may not last. The day may come soon when we are forced to share this status with a new kind of being, one whose intelligence is of our own design.

Robots are coming, that much is sure. They are coming to our streets as self-driving cars, to our military as automated drones, to our homes as elder-care robots—and that’s just to name a few on the horizon (Ten million households already enjoy cleaner floors thanks to a relatively dumb little robot called the Roomba).

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Death Is The Road To Awe: The Art of Joseph McVetty.

Visions Of The Reverend Mother, 35''x46'' Latex paint, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Visions Of The Reverend Mother, 35”x46” Latex paint, gouache, and pencil on paper.

Joseph McVetty is an artist and illustrator living and working in Portland, Oregon. The masked participants of these drawings are acting out communal rituals involving new age occult signifiers such as crystals, chakras, energy fields, levitation, and conjuring. Each drawing aims to evoke the feelings associated with the cultish, drop-out supernaturalism, and homespun magic.

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You Can’t Really Dust For Vomit

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Thursday

5am:
I slept in.

I’m just now shuffling up all zombie-like to the bullet-proof glass window to slide my five “tip” thru the metal tray to Sammy in exchange for 137’s key and medallion. I’m still feeling the generic brand nighttime cough syrup that I’ve been abusing to put myself down at my prescribed 8pm bedtime. My head is fuzzy still.

I passed 137, my regular Prius, en route to the window and noted that her windows are all down. Bad omen. Are we talking vomit?

5:05am:
I’m done with the window and cordial niceties with Sammy, the new-ish office worker that Citizen’s Cab poached from Arrow. Sammy and I have finally gotten a groove on it seems. But he’s a little out of it this morning, complaining about some serious bruising due to a boating accident over unspecified body parts that he promises I do not want to see.

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NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

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Charles A.A. Dellschau (1830 – 1923), untitled watercolor on paper c. 1898 – 1900 approx. 8 x 10 inches.

 

NYMZA Aeros – Charles Dellschau and The Secret Airships of the 1850’s

by Jimmy Ward & Pete Navarro
Posted on 15 May 2015 by Olav Phillips

Have you heard of Schultz’ Hydrowhir Auto, also known as the “Cripel Wagon”? If not, perhaps you have heard or read somewhere about Peter Mennis’ “Aero Goosey”? How about Schoetler’s “Aero Dora”, which was built in 1858 and was destroyed in a fire which consumed the town of Columbia, California that same year? Chances are you never heard or read about any of the above or the many other “Aeros’, or aircraft that were designed and actually built and flown
by members of the Sonora Aero Club around the middle of the last century in California.

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RITHIKA MERCHANT- Mosaics of Myths

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RITHIKA MERCHANT

Rithika Merchant (1986) deals with creating mosaics of myths that question received histories that are available to us throughout culture. An inherent feminism exists in her decoration undermining the minimalism of modernity that views a woman just as a muse.

In 2008 she graduated with a Bachelors in Fine Arts from Parsons the New School for Design in New York. She has studied painting and conceptual practice at the Hellenic International Studies In The Arts in Paros, Greece. In 2008 she was a resident at the Convento Sao Francisco Mertola in Mertola, Portugal.

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William Mortensen – The Antichrist of American Photography in the House of the Devil

By Adam Parfrey

A few decades ago we spent a good deal of time at Anton LaVey’s “black house” in San Francisco’s Richmond District.

On the walls and on the shelves were a lot of items to look at and consider. One photograph, seen in the kitchen, was a framed and signed photograph of a hunching woman overlapped by a depraved cloaked ghost. The photo was called “Fear,” and it was the work of  William Mortensen (1897 – 1965).

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William Mortensen “Fear” c. 1930’s (also titled “Obsession”) Manipulted Photograph

Anton spoke of Mortensen’s influence in guiding him to understand the mechanics of “Lesser Magic,” or what affects people’s reaction to what they see and absorb.

Mortensen’s photographs like “Fear” are fascinating, but for years I resisted Mortensen’s reductive ideas regarding human behavior. It all seemed too reptilian to me. But there came the time when researcher Larry Lytle approached me about publishing a monograph on William Mortensen.… Read the rest

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