Tag Archives | Pseudoscience

TED, Monsanto, Pseudoscience and GMOs

TED_CensorshipEarlier this year Rupert Sheldrake and Graham Hancock suffered a form of censorship at the hands of TED, a dispute covered amply here at disinformation. However, we missed a none too dissimilar spat regarding TED telling its TEDx event organizers to avoid “pseudoscience” and that red flag topics included GMOs and “Food as medicine.” Mike Adams jumped all over it at Natural News, writing:

Allow me to be the first to announce that TED is dead. Why? Because the group that organizes so-called “TED talks” has been thoroughly hijacked by corporate junk science and now openly rejects any talks about GMOs, food as medicine, or even the subject of how food can help prevent behavioral disorders in children. All these areas of discussion are now red-flagged from being presented on any TED stage.

This is openly admitted by TEDx itself in a little-known letter publicly published on December 7, 2012. 

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Inside Reality With The Flat Earth Society

flat_earthIs the notion that our planet’s roundness a massive conspiracy perpetrated across centuries? The fascinating Flat Earth Society says yes, and attempts to address all of your doubts in their comprehensive FAQ guide:

The evidence for a flat earth is derived from many different facets of science and philosophy. The simplest is by relying on ones own senses to discern the true nature of the world around us. The world looks flat, the bottoms of clouds are flat, the movement of the sun; these are all examples of your senses telling you that we do not live on a spherical heliocentric world

Perhaps the best example of flat earth proof is the Bedford Level Experiment. In short, this was an experiment preformed many times on a six-mile stretch of water that proved the surface of the water to be flat. It did not conform to the curvature of the earth that round earth proponents teach.

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Gay Marriage is Scientifically Impossible Because Magnets

img-thingMagnets: How Do They Work? If you’re attempting to prove that gay marriage is scientifically impossible then the answer is not very well. Not. Very. Well. A Nigerian student has attempted to use magnets to “scientifically” prove that gay marriage is impossible.

Death and Taxes:

A bar magnet is a horizontal magnet that has the North Pole and the South Pole and when you bring two bar magnets and you bring the North Pole together you find that the two North Poles will not attract. They will repel, that is, they will push away themselves showing that a man should not attract a man. If you bring two South Poles together you find that the two South Poles will not attract indicating that same sex marriage should not hold. A female should not attract a female as South Pole of a magnet does not attract the South Pole of a magnet.

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Happy Water Crystals Debunked as PseudoScience

Are Dr. Masaru Emoto’s Fantastic Claims Actually Real?Emoto_web

Via is-masaru-emoto-for-real.com

When I first heard of Dr. Emoto’s amazing work with water crystals through his book “The Hidden Messages in Water” I was absolutely stunned. I then saw the movie “What the Bleep do we Know” and became thoroughly intrigued. I set off to conduct a research project in the chemistry department of Castleton College in Vermont to see if I could find sufficient evidence and support for Dr. Emoto’s claims to merit conducting a deeper research project to try to reproduce his work. The idea was to uncover as much information about his methods and procedures as possible to determine if is would actually be feasible to study the effect of energy healing, such as Reiki, on the formation of water crystals. I was so excited to think that I might be the first person in the world to verify his work!… Read the rest

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Can Vortex Mathematics Lead to Free Energy, or is It Just More Fluff?

symbol of enlightenmentI came across the following post in an occult group on Facebook:  “Only God could have created a 9 number system that can encompass infinity with a zero as the emanation [Chaos].”  Just the kind of quirky and weird statement I just can’t pass up.  “I’ll bite,” I commented.

I was led by the poster to a number of videos featuring Marko Rodin, who discovered what he termed, “Vortex Mathematics.”  While attempting to decode the greatest name of God in the Bahá’í faith, using Abjad numerical notation, he created a symbol consisting of the nine arabic numerals inscribed upon a circle.  He called this the “symbol of enlightenment” (shown at right) which he has also referred to as “the mathematical thumbprint of God.”

For me, understanding math is like trying to walk up a grassy hill in the rain with flip flops that are two sizes too large.… Read the rest

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The Preformationist Explanation Of Reproduction And The Creation Of Life

Preformationism—one of the dominant scientific theories of the 18th century—is the belief that a tiny tree is hidden inside every seed, and a tiny person curled up inside every sperm. Via Wikipedia:

In the history of biology, preformationism (or preformism) is the idea that organisms develop from miniature versions of themselves. Instead of assembly from parts, preformationists believe that the form of living things exist, in real terms, prior to their development. It suggests that all organisms were created at the same time, and that succeeding generations grow from homunculi that have existed since the beginning of creation.

Pythagoras is one of the earliest thinkers credited with ideas about the origin of form in the biological production of offspring. It is said that he originated “spermism”, the doctrine that fathers contribute the essential characteristics of their offspring while mothers contribute only a material substrate.

The groundbreaking scientific insights provided by Galileo and Descartes seemed to support preformationism.

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Chairobics Too Strenuous?

Wake Up, Disinfo: It's Time to Oxycise! Via Oxycise.com:
"Then one day, like Archimedes of old, it happened. In a physiology textbook there it was: fat oxidizes into carbon dioxide. Wait a second, I read that line again: fat oxidizes into carbon dioxide. No way! So you’re telling me that all I have to do is breathe to lose weight. I can’t believe no one has ever told me this before. Fat leaves my body through breathing??"  
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Want People to Believe in Your Paranormal Experience? Make it Sound “Science-y”

Picture: Harry Price (PD)

In this technological and mechanistic age that good old fashioned ghost stories don’t stand a chance of being accepted as plausible unless you sprinkle a little pseudoscience into the mix. This generation of  flim-flam artists may be just stumbling onto this fact, but fiction writers (as well as some of the earliest ghost-hunters) have known it for years. The protagonists of Bram Stoker’s Dracula bring modern technology to their fight against the eponymous vampire, as do the heroes (and villains) of several H.P. Lovecraft tales such as “The Shunned House”, “From Beyond”. Even Arthur Machen utilized scientific jargon in his classic story of the supernatural (or preternatural?) “The Great God Pan.”

An interesting study from LiveScience shows that a little techno-babble can go a long way in convincing people of the plausibility of supernatural experiences:

Fans of paranormal reality TV shows like “Ghost Hunters” and “Ghost Adventures” are treated to an array of technical jargon and references to fancy instruments — ion generators, electromagnetic field detectors and video goggles with built-in speech-synthesizers that allegedly can sense spirits.

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The Return of Scientific Racism

Picture: Library of Congress (PD)

Zach Musgrave writes at sleptlate.org:

“Scientific racism” is a slur in the academy, roughly analogous to calling something “psuedoscientific” in the mainstream scientific community. Largely because there are observed differences in the results of IQ tests of different races, it is politically correct in many academic circles to refer to general intelligence under the euphemism “whatever it is that IQ tests measure.”

And, in fact, it’s solid science that performance on such tests is strongly influenced by individuals’ own perceptions of their ability. Blacks taking a test that is presented as a “laboratory exercise” outperform those taking the same test presented as an exam. In Predictably Irrational, Dan Ariely relates an even more intriguing experimental result. Researchers seeking to understand the effect that stereotypes have on math test performance decided to see if they could study the interaction between two conflicting stereotypes: that Asians are good at math; and that women are bad at it.

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