Tag Archives | Psychedelics

Talking Acid, Feminism, and UFOs with Visionary Director Phil Mucci (Plus Torche’s Annihilation Affair Video Debut)

torche_stills11One thing I’m constantly trying to relay about next level communication is that it doesn’t happen with words, but rather through means of subjectively projected telepathic metaphor. In the vast majority of UFO contactee reports, one encounters similar stories about blackened psionic eyes that peer directly into the soul. Eyes that can project and receive pure information. Metaphorically of course, I’d argue that we’re unconsciously engaging in this pursuit with our increasingly art-centric lifestyles. Theses days, half of our experiences involve movies, video games, albums, celebrity sex fantasies, and cutesy kitten GIFS. The reason I’m mentioning this, for probably the bajillionth time, has to do with this interview I just did with the visionary music video director Phil Mucci (who’s films other films you can check out here, or read my top 5 list of here). I honestly knew very little about Phil when I stumbled on his work last fall, but through watching his subversive psychedelic shorts, I realized that I knew far more about him than I initially thought.… Read the rest

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Could Psilocybin Be the Next Caffeine? A Microdosing Report.

darksideofthesun3Well, this is an odd one. Typically if you were going to read an article of mine about psychedelics, it’d be about telepathic communication with higher dimensional forms of insectile intelligence or plants or some shit (which I continually pontificate about on Facebook, friend me). That’s just sort of how I roll and, as a matter of fact, I just participated in a research study for John Hopkins University in regards to that exact topic. So it’s not sounding so crazy anymore, is it? But, as with most bizzarro endeavors I find myself engaged in, I am but a talking monkey guided by means of mostly unseen synchromystic entanglement.

Last fall, I tossed up a post about the Hypnotikon psychedelic music festival in Seattle. After writing about it, I thought to myself, “hmmm, maybe I should try microdosing for this thing.” It’s something I’d read about, but hadn’t truly considered experimenting with a whole lot before then.… Read the rest

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Psychedelic Drug Use ‘Does Not Increase Risk for Mental Health Problems’

Don’t worry acidheads, tripping won’t give you mental problems (in fact it might actually reduce them), per this report at MNT:

An analysis of data provided by 135,000 randomly selected participants – including 19,000 people who had used drugs such as LSD and magic mushrooms – finds that use of psychedelics does not increase risk of developing mental health problems. The results are published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.
Pink Elephants on Parade Blotter LSD Dumbo.jpg

Pink Elephants on Parade Blotter LSD Dumbo by Psychonaught

 

Psychedelics, such as LSD and magic mushrooms, do not increase risk of developing mental health problems, according to the new study.

Previously, the researchers behind the study – from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim – had conducted a population study investigating associations between mental health and psychedelic use. However, that study, which looked at data from 2001-04, was unable to find a link between use of these drugs and mental health problems.

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Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) on Reddit

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The folks at the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) did a Reddit AMA yesterday. I’ve curated some of the more informative questions and answers, but you can read the entire thread here.

MAPS introduces themselves with this lengthy but informative opening:

We are the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), and we are here to educate the public about research into the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana. MAPS is a 501(c)(3) non-profit research and educational organization founded in 1986 that develops medical, legal, and cultural contexts for people to benefit from the careful uses of psychedelics and marijuana.

We envision a world where psychedelics and marijuana are safely and legally available for beneficial uses, and where research is governed by rigorous scientific evaluation of their risks and benefits.

Some of the topics we’re passionate about include;

  • Research into the therapeutic potential of MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, ayahuasca, ibogaine, and marijuana
  • Integrating psychedelics and marijuana into science, medicine, therapy, culture, spirituality, and policy
  • Providing harm reduction and education services at large-scale events to help reduce the risks associated with the non-medical use of various drugs
  • Ways to communicate with friends, family, and the public about the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana
  • Our vision for a post-prohibition world
  • Developing psychedelics and marijuana into prescription medicines through FDA-approved clinical research

List of participants:

  • Rick Doblin, Ph.D., Founder and Executive Director, MAPS
  • Brad Burge, Director of Communications and Marketing, MAPS
  • Amy Emerson, Executive Director and Director of Clinical Research, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Virginia Wright, Director of Development, MAPS
  • Brian Brown, Communications and Marketing Associate, MAPS
  • Sara Gael, Harm Reduction Coordinator, MAPS
  • Natalie Lyla Ginsberg, Research and Advocacy Coordinator, MAPS
  • Tess Goodwin, Development Assistant, MAPS
  • Ilsa Jerome, Ph.D., Research and Information Specialist, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Sarah Jordan, Publications Associate, MAPS
  • Bryce Montgomery, Web and Multimedia Associate, MAPS
  • Shannon Clare Petitt, Executive Assistant, MAPS
  • Linnae Ponté, Director of Harm Reduction, MAPS
  • Ben Shechet, Clinical Research Associate, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Allison Wilens, Clinical Study Assistant, MAPS Public Benefit Corporation
  • Berra Yazar-Klosinski, Ph.D., Clinical Research Scientist, MAPS

For more information about scientific research into the medical potential of psychedelics and marijuana, visitmaps.org.

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Liam Wilson of The Dillinger Escape Plan on Midwest Real | Rabbit Holes Never End

Via Midwest Real

Liam Wilson of The Dillinger Escape Plan talks fatherhood, consciousness and nomadic, otherworldly, head-sucking Ayahuasca shamans. 

ITUNES  STITCHER DOWNLOAD

somespaceshitbrightliamLiam Wilson is a successful musician, psychonaut, yogi, meditator,traveler and writer (by no means does he live an unexamined, life). Yet, nothing has prepared him one bit for the trajectory-altering, love-filled uppercut to the nethers of your ego that is fatherhood.

As if that weren’t nuclear enough, Liam just participated in a two-day Ayahuasca ceremony run by a mysterious, otherworldly, head-sucking, nomadic shaman. An experience that has left him reconsidering even the most basic anchors we ground our very realities with.

Liam is a contributing writer at Talkhouse. If you’re a fan of heavy music and somehow haven’t listened to his band The Dillinger Escape Plan, what in the name of Satan’s gnarled beard is wrong with you? 

Get in touch!  Follow Midwest Real on Twitter and  Facebook.Read the rest

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Decalcifying Your Pineal Gland W/ Dr. Dennis McKenna

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Disinfonauts!

On this edition of the Gabriel D. Roberts podcast, Gabriel interviews Dr. Dennis McKenna and asks the questions you’ve been wanting answers to! Was Terence McKenna a CIA/FBI operative? Can you de-gunk your pineal gland? Was Terence afraid of taking Mushrooms after an existential crisis? What is the state of psychedelic research now? These questions and more will be answered in this motherland of a podcast.

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Prehistoric High Times: Early Humans Used Magic Mushrooms, Opium

Sonja (CC BY 2.0)

Sonja (CC BY 2.0)

By Agata Blaszczak-Boxe via LiveScience:

Opium, “magic” mushrooms and other psychoactive substances have been used since prehistoric times all over the world, according to a new review of archaeological findings.

The evidence shows that people have been consuming psychoactive substances for centuries, or even millennia, in many regions of the world, said Elisa Guerra-Doce, an associate professor of prehistory at the University of Valladolid in Spain, who wrote the review.

Guerra-Doce’s previous research showed the use of psychoactive substances in prehistoric Eurasia. The new review “brings together data related to the early use of drug plants and fermented beverages all over the world,” Guerra-Doce told Live Science.

For example, the evidence shows that people have been chewing the leaves of a plant called the betel since at least 2660 B.C., according to Guerra-Doce’s report. The plant contains chemicals that have stimulant- and euphoria-inducing properties, and these days is mostly consumed in Asia.

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The Trip Treatment (Psychedelics Are Back)

It’s no longer new news that hallucinogenic or “psychedelic” drugs are once again being clinically tested to treat a number of human ailments. Not every article about this is written by the wonderful Michael Pollan, however. His essay for the New Yorker is a long read and highly informative:

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On an April Monday in 2010, Patrick Mettes, a fifty-four-year-old television news director being treated for a cancer of the bile ducts, read an article on the front page of the Times that would change his death. His diagnosis had come three years earlier, shortly after his wife, Lisa, noticed that the whites of his eyes had turned yellow. By 2010, the cancer had spread to Patrick’s lungs and he was buckling under the weight of a debilitating chemotherapy regimen and the growing fear that he might not survive. The article, headlined “HALLUCINOGENS HAVE DOCTORS TUNING IN AGAIN,” mentioned clinical trials at several universities, including N.Y.U., in which psilocybin—the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms—was being administered to cancer patients in an effort to relieve their anxiety and “existential distress.” One of the researchers was quoted as saying that, under the influence of the hallucinogen, “individuals transcend their primary identification with their bodies and experience ego-free states .

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