Psychedelics






Duncan TrussellDuncan Trussell | The DisinfoCast with Matt Staggs: Episode 09

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Comedian, actor, writer and podcaster Duncan Trussell (The Duncan Trussell Family Hour, MADtv, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Nick Swardson’s Pretend Time) joins me for this episode of The DisinfoCast. Trussell talks about his childhood attempt to raise quail from the dead, his experiences as a student of Zen and the ways in which psychedelics are like personal lubricants. When you’re done listening to the show, visit Duncan at www.duncantrussell.com.



Far Cry 3A pirated video from what must be a beta test of upcoming shooter Far Cry 3 features a mission in which the player gathers psychoactive mushrooms for a rogue scientist.

In the course of the mission the character is exposed to the mushroom’s active ingredients. The relevant footage begins at 3:47.

Warning: the video is of poor quality due to whatever the poster used to extract the footage from the game. Watch it now before manufacturer UbiSoft pulls it down.

Bonus: Check out the near-photorealistic official trailer for some “uncanny valley” fun.









A short film by Alexander G. Ward on his Ayahuasca experience at the Tierra Vida Ayahuasca retreat in Pucallpa, Peru. Includes an introduction on Ayahuasca, the process of creating Ayahuasca, footage of an actual Ayahuasca ceremony and explanation on the psychedelic experience including his thoughts and conclusion.




Recorded by Mitch Schultz, Russell Brand joined Daniel Pinchbeck, Graham Hancock and a galactivated group of Reality Sandwich retreat-goers at the Boulder Mountain Guest Ranch in Utah for a frank and funny conversation covering a wide range of topics including the nature of contemporary media, quantum physics, the difference between psychedelics and “horrible drugs that nullify you”, what comes after time, and the idea that people have been “coded” by society not to anticipate change.

Follow Daniel on Twitter.



Disinformation readers who have read Graham Hancock‘s recent books Supernatural and Entangled are well aware that hallucinogens can be powerful and highly effective medicine, but until recently US government policy more or less prohibited any scientific research. The tide is starting to turn, as this article from the LA Times makes clear:

What a long, strange trip it’s been. In the 1960s and ’70s, a rebellious generation embraced hallucinogens and a wide array of street drugs to “turn on, tune in and drop out.” Almost half a century later, magic mushrooms, LSD, Ecstasy and ketamine are being studied for legitimate therapeutic uses. Scientists believe these agents have the potential to help patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, drug or alcohol addiction, unremitting pain or depression and the existential anxiety of terminal illness.

“Scientifically, these compounds are way too important not to study,” said Johns Hopkins psychopharmacologist Roland Griffiths, who conducted the psilocybin trial.

In their next incarnation, these drugs may help the psychologically wounded tune in to their darkest feelings and memories and turn therapy sessions into heightened opportunities to learn and heal…


50 Watts has a jaw-dropping collection of seemingly hallucinogen-inspired illustrations culled from 1970s science textbooks, revealing striking new ways of understanding biology, psychology, and sex ed concepts. School was truly trippy back…