Tag Archives | Psychology

Disinfo Roulette

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Thought I’d play a little Disinfo Roulette on the wayback machine today.

Hazy linear randomization across year base and circular fuzzy revolutions on month selection grid = June 16, 2001

Daily DubyaWatch

“It was as if The Illuminati had tapped me on the shoulder and handed me the details of their next four-year phase for achieving world domination. Over the next few months I watched George W. Bush segue into America’s 43rd Presidency, and was amazed that many of the broad geopolitical systems and policy changes that Dr. Don Beck predicted had begun to occur.”

Editor’s Note: The above article is no longer available.

Timothy McVeigh: Show Me the Money

“Why have they released none of the tapes to the public of their supposed confession? Why have they not published his supposed letter? More important, why hasn’t any major media outlet requested this information?”

You Are Being Lied To

“You Are Being Lied To acts as a battering ram against the distortions, myths, and outright lies that have been shoved down our throats by the government, the media, corporations, organized religion, the scientific establishment, and others who want to keep the truth from us.”

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10 Reasons Why Our Universe Is A Virtual Reality

Tom (CC BY 2.0)

Tom (CC BY 2.0)

via Listverse:

Physical realism is the view that the physical world we see is real and exists by itself, alone. Most people think this is self-evident, but physical realism has been struggling with the facts of physics for some time now. The paradoxes that baffled physics last century still baffle it today, and its great hopes of string theory and supersymmetry aren’t leading anywhere.

In contrast, quantum theory works, but quantum waves that entangle, superpose, then collapse to a point are physically impossible—they must be “imaginary.” So for the first time in history, a theory of what doesn’t exist is successfully predicting what does—but how can the unreal predict the real?

Quantum realism is the opposite view—that the quantum world is real and is creating the physical world as a virtual reality. Quantum mechanics thus predicts physical mechanics because it causes them. Physics saying that quantum states don’t exist is like the Wizard of Oz telling Dorothy, “Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.”

Quantum realism isn’t The Matrix, where the other world making ours was also physical.

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Violent TV May Make Children More Susceptible to Advertising Messages

Sagie (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Sagie (CC BY-SA 2.0)

via Activist Post:

A study by a University of Wisconsin-Madison journalism researcher has found that children who watch television shows with action or violence are more susceptible to messages in the advertisements shown during the programs.

Eunji Cho, a graduate student in UW-Madison’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication, says the excitement of a violent show causes children to be focused and attentive, an effect that carries over to commercial breaks.

To perform this study, Cho returned to her native South Korea and observed four different kindergarten classes. Each class was randomly assigned to watch either “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” or “A Dog of Flanders,” a calm Japanese program. The kids were then shown an ad for chocolate at commercial breaks.

Afterward, the children were asked to choose which candy bar they wanted — the one advertised in the commercials or a generic brand. Cho found that students who watched the violent show overwhelmingly favored the advertised product, while those who watched the calm show were indifferent about which candy bar they chose.

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Woman Opens Professional Cuddling Shop, Struggles to Keep Up with Demand

Photo: Cuddle Up to Me

Photo: Cuddle Up to Me

via Oddity Central:

This Oregon woman is paying her bills by cuddling with people all day. It might not sound like much of a career choice, but believe it or not, Samantha Hess is making a decent living out of hugging. Within a week of opening her store – ‘Cuddle Up To Me’ – she has already gotten requests from a whopping 10,000 customers!

Samantha charges her clients (who must be above 18 years of age) $1 per minute of cuddling in one of four themed rooms at her store. She also provides remote services by travelling to locations of her clients’ choice. She calls it a method of self-taught therapy through which she helps people feel loved and get comfortable with the physical touch. The snuggles are strictly platonic, of course, and she signs an agreement with her customers to be clean, courteous and to keep their clothes on at all times.

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Learn physics with CERN’s John Ellis in ‘A Brief Guide to Everything’

iai-academy

Last month, The Institute of Art and Ideas (IAI), an organization committed to spreading “a progressive and vibrant intellectual culture in the UK,” launched IAI Academy — a new online educational platform that features free courses in everything from theoretical physics to the future of feminism. Get up to speed with what physicists do and don’t know with CERN physicist John Ellis’ ‘A Brief Guide to Everything’ or discover the meaning of life with sociologist Steve Fuller.

The initial lineup has 12 courses – here’s the list:

  • A Brief Guide to Everything – Web Video – John Ellis, King’s College London, CBE 
  • The Meaning of Life – Web Video – Steve Fuller, University of Warwick
  • New Adventures in Spacetime – Web Video – Eleanor Knox, King’s College London
  • Minds, Morality and Agency – Web Video – Mark Rowlands, University of Miami
  • Nine Myths About Schizophrenia – Web Video – Richard Bentall, University of Liverpool
  • The History of Fear – Web Video – Frank Furedi, University of Kent
  • Physics: What We Still Don’t Know – Web Video – David Tong, Cambridge
  • Science vs.
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The Hunting of the SNARC

In 2010, a group of scientists discovered that they could tell what random number a person was thinking from the movement of their eyes.

…But this might not work on people who have never learned to read, whose first language was Arabic, or who have recently looked at a clock.

This is all part of one of the strangest things ever seen in psychology – A phenomenon called The SNARC Effect.

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Liberals Are More Emotion-Driven than Conservatives

dscn2877

Via ScienceDaily:

Emotions are powerful motivators of human behavior and attitudes. Emotions also play an important role in guiding policy support in conflict and other political contexts. Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya have studied the interaction between emotion and political ideology, showing that the motivating power of emotions is not the same for those on different ends of the ideological spectrum. Their research is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Design of the study

The researchers conducted six studies to examine emotions, ideology, and how they act together to affect support for policies. The first two studies focused on intergroup empathy, while the third study examined the interactive influence of ideology and despair on support for policies. Participants self-identified as being at different points of the right-left ideological spectrum.

Specific scenarios were selected for the six studies relating to current events in Israel, mainly surrounding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and possible steps towards its resolution.

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What Architecture Is Doing to Your Brain

Saint Basil's Cathedral in Moscow. (Katie Brady/Flickr)

Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow. (Katie Brady/Flickr)

via City Lab:

At a particular moment during every tour of Georgetown University’s campus, it becomes necessary for the student guide to acknowledge the singular blight in an otherwise idyllic environment.

“Lauinger Library was designed to be a modern abstraction of Healy Hall…,” a sentence that inevitably trails off with an apologetic shrug, inviting the crowd to arrive at their own conclusions about how well it turned out. Much of the student population would likely agree that the library’s menacing figure on the quad is nothing short of soul-crushing. New research conducted by a team of architects and neuroscientists suggests that architecture may indeed affect mental states, though they choose to focus on the positive.

I spoke with Dr. Julio Bermudez, the lead of a new study that uses fMRI to capture the effects of architecture on the brain. His team operates with the goal of using the scientific method to transform something opaque—the qualitative “phenomenologies of our built environment”—into neuroscientific observations that architects and city planners can deliberately design for.

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Synchromusicology Pt. IV: Symphonic Sorcery, New Aeon Magic, and The Silence Between the Gnosis

“We join spokes together in a wheel,
but it is the center hole
that makes the wagon move.

We shape clay into a pot,
but it is the emptiness inside
that holds whatever we want.

We hammer wood for a house,
but it is the inner space
that makes it a home.

We work with being,
but non-being is what we use.”

– Lao Tzu

 

Via Youtube:

Synchromusicology Pt. IV: Symphonic Sorcery, New Aeon Magic, and The Silence Between the Gnosis

 

Past:

Part I

Part II

Part III

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Deceptive behavior may (deceivingly) promote cooperation

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

JD Hancock (CC BY 2.0)

via Phys.org:

Tricking someone into trusting you in order to gain something from them is common behavior in both the animal and human worlds. From cuckoo birds that trick other bird species into raising their young, to cunning salespeople who pretend to sell you a product that will improve your life, deviant behavior takes many forms. But no matter the situation, the result is that a single individual gains something while the community at large loses.

For researchers who study the evolution of cooperation, deceitful behavior seems to throw a wrench in mechanisms that promote cooperative behavior. Questions arise such as, under what conditions does deception evolve? How effective are strategies to identify deceitful behavior? And how can deceitful behavior coexist with cooperative behavior?

In a recent paper published in The New Journal of Physics, Attila Szolnoki at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, and Matjaž Perc at the University of Maribor in Slovenia and King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, have addressed these questions using a variant of perhaps the most popular tool for studying cooperation—the prisoner’s dilemma game.… Read the rest

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