Tag Archives | public domain

Anonymous’s ‘Black March’ Media Survival Guide

"copyrighted media won't be allowed while internet is censored"

"copyrighted media won't be allowed while internet is censored"

Anonymous and other various Internet freedom groups are calling on people to boycott the corporate media for the entire month of March 2012 in efforts to affect the bottom line of organizations calling for the imposition of The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement.  ACTA will profoundly restrict the fundamental rights, freedom of expression and communication privacy of Internet users the world over.

For those of you who intend to participate in the boycott, there is plenty of public domain and Creative Commons licensed  media that, for now, is freely available for you to download and enjoy, enough for the entire month of March.

The following is by no means an exhaustive list of sources to help you remain entertained while participating in the Black March Boycotts.

Video

Audio / Music / Sound

Text / Books / Magazines / Literature

Please dig in, re-view some classics and enjoy our open media heritage, while it remains free and open, and feel free to post your suggestions of Black March safe media.… Read the rest

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Supreme Court Rules Congress May ‘Re-Copyright’ Public Domain Works

719646029Decades or centuries after its creator has passed on to another realm, a piece of art or film or literature may remain copyrighted content, perhaps forever, the Supreme Court has ruled. Ars Technica reports:

Congress may take books, musical compositions and other works out of the public domain, where they can be freely used and adapted, and grant them copyright status again, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. In a 6-2 ruling, the court ruled that just because material enters the public domain, it is not “territory that works may never exit.”

The top court was ruling on a petition by a group of orchestra conductors, educators, performers, publishers and film archivists who urged the justices to reverse an appellate court that ruled against the group, which has relied on artistic works in the public domain for their livelihoods.

They claimed that re-copyrighting public works would breach the speech rights of those who are now using those works without needing a license.

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