Tag Archives | Racism

The Strange World Of Sociopolitical Sex Fetishes

In a segment of the 1996 documentary Fetishes, filmmaker Nick Broomfield uncovers an unsettling realm of human sexuality – fetishes that reflect historical and sociopolitical realities through a twisted mirror:
Just when I thought i'd seen it all, I encountered [fetish] sessions that seemed to stem directly from social and political issues…the dilemma of a white policeman who worked a black area…several Jewish clients were into concentration camp scenarios…some black clients were into plantation scenarios. Most fetishes are the eroticizations of one's worst fears and nightmares:
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Hungry Canadian Aboriginal Children Were Used in Government Experiments During 1940s

Lockwood

Temporary ration card. Click for more info.

It appears that Candian natives, including children,  were starved on purpose by researchers back in the 1940s and 50s.

via The Star

Aboriginal children were deliberately starved in the 1940s and ’50s by government researchers in the name of science.

Milk rations were halved for years at residential schools across the country.

Essential vitamins were kept from people who needed them.

Dental services were withheld because gum health was a measuring tool for scientists and dental care would distort research.

For over a decade, aboriginal children and adults were unknowingly subjected to nutritional experiments by Canadian government bureaucrats.

This disturbing look into government policy toward aboriginals after World War II comes to light in recently published historical research.

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Florida Mom Received Twenty-Year Sentence For Firing Warning Shots To Abusive Husband

firing warning shotsFrom one year ago, a case that has been compared and contrasted with George Zimmerman’s in regards to notions of “self defense” and “Stand Your Ground” in the Florida legal system. Reported by CBS News:

A Florida woman who fired warning shots against her allegedly abusive husband has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

Marissa Alexander of Jacksonville had said the state’s “Stand Your Ground” law should apply to her because she was defending herself against her allegedly abusive husband when she fired warning shots inside her home in August 2010. She told police it was to escape a brutal beating by her husband, against whom she had already taken out a protective order.

Under Florida’s mandatory minimum sentencing requirements Alexander couldn’t receive a lesser sentence, even though she has never been in trouble with the law before.

According to a sworn deposition, Marissa Alexander’s husband, Rico Gray, said that he and Alexander began fighting after he found text messages to Alexander’s first husband on her phone.

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The Mind-Boggling ‘Literacy Test’ Louisiana Gave To Black Voters In The 1960s

You may have heard that prior to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (gutted by the Supreme Court a week ago), across much of the American South blacks were denied the right to vote if they failed a literacy test. You might imagine that a literacy test confirms one’s ability to read and write. You would be wrong. Via Slate, take a shot at passing the actual test given to black voters in Louisiana in 1964. Remember that if you want to vote, you must get a perfect score, you have a mere 10 minutes to do the entire test, and half the questions don’t actually make sense. Also your results will be scored by the racist white voting registrar.

literacy test

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Key Portion Of Voting Rights Act

voting rights actThe Supreme Court giveth some rights, and taketh others away. The Los Angeles Times reports:

A sharply divided Supreme Court has struck down a key part of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965, freeing the Southern states from federal oversight of their election laws and setting off a fierce reaction from civil rights advocates and Democratic leaders.

The court’s conservative majority moved boldly Tuesday to rein in a law revered by civil rights groups that is credited with transforming the South by ensuring blacks could register and vote. In doing so, the court eliminated a tool that the Justice Department used hundreds of times to prevent cities, counties and states from adopting allegedly discriminatory voting rules.

Speaking for a 5-4 majority, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. pronounced the Voting Rights Act’s pre-clearance process a “resounding success” — and then declared it unconstitutional. The decision is likely to be felt in small towns and cities across the South, legal experts said.

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Black 14-Year-Old With Puppy Choked By Miami-Dade Police Over ‘Dehumanizing Stares’


Racism or just cowardice?  Via the Huffington Post:

Miami-Dade Police says officers were forced to throw a beach-going 14-year-old to the ground and forcibly restrain him because of clenched fists and “dehumanizing stares,” as first reported by CBS Miami.

But Tremaine McMillian says he was merely walking along the beach on Memorial Day, feeding his puppy from a bottle, when police overreacted. Cell phone video shot by his mother shows the unarmed teen pressed to ground at Haulover Beach as one police officer holds his forearm across McMillian’s throat and another places him in handcuffs.

“He started choking me, and as he was choking me, I urinated on myself because I couldn’t breath,” the teen told WSVN.

McMillian’s family told news outlets they were enjoying the beach when the officers took exception to the way the teen had been roughhousing with a friend in the surf. McMillian says the officers drove up on an ATV and confronted him before leaping off and choking him.

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Government Data Suggests That Blacks Are Singled Out For Marijuana Arrests

marijuana possession arrests

What does one call laws that are selectively enforced on different segments of the population? The New York Times reports:

Black Americans were nearly four times as likely as whites to be arrested on charges of marijuana possession in 2010, even though the two groups used the drug at similar rates, according to new federal data.

Though there has been a shift in state laws and in popular attitudes about the drug, black and white Americans have experienced the change very differently. Public attitudes toward marijuana softened and a number of states decriminalized its use. But about half of all drug arrests in 2011 were on marijuana-related charges, roughly the same portion as in 2010.

“We found that in virtually every county in the country, police have wasted taxpayer money enforcing marijuana laws in a racially biased manner,” said Ezekiel Edwards, the director of the A.C.L.U.’s Criminal Law Reform Project. In 2010, states spent an estimated $3.6 billion enforcing marijuana possession laws, a 30 percent increase from 10 years earlier.

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The Woolwich Murder and Inflaming Racial Tensions

SpotthediferenceVia orwellwasright:

The brutal murder of a man in Woolwich, set upon by two men wielding knives and machetes, inevitably led to a lot of heated responses, not least from the hundreds of closet bigots coming out of the woodwork on social media networks, eager to denounce Islam and calling for all Muslims to be thrown out of the country, or worse. Certainly, the reported scenario – Islamic extremists attack serving British soldier who was wearing a ‘Help for Heroes’ t-shirt in broad daylight – is about as shocking and sensational as you can get, guaranteed to inflame racial tensions in a country where years of terrorism and immigration propaganda has worked to instill a culture of fear and separation throughout the population.

Some of the comments on Facebook on the evening of the murder left me under the impression that the ghost of Enoch Powell had somehow merged with the internet, possessing people with a relentless, savage desire for rivers of Muslim blood cascading through the streets of Britain.

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Inside Paris’s Belle Époque-Era Human Zoo

human zooMessy Nessy Chic on a surreal symbol of the history of colonialism — the human zoo:

In the furthest corner of the Vincennes woods of Paris lies the remains of what was once a public exhibition to promote French colonialism over 100 years ago and what we can only refer to today as the equivalent of a human zoo.

In 1907, six different villages were built in the Jardin d’Agronomie Tropicale, representing all corners of the French colonial empire at the time– Madagascar, Indochine, Sudan, Congo, Tunisia and Morocco. The villages and their pavillions were built to recreate the life and culture as it was in their original habitats. This included mimicking the architecture, importing the agriculture and appallingly, inhabiting the replica houses with people, brought to Paris from the faraway territories.

Over one million curious visitors [attended] from May until October 1907 when it ended. Today, the Jardin d’Agronomie Tropicale is kept out of sight behind rusty padlocked gates, abandoned and decaying.

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The National Disgrace Of Marijuana Possession Arrests

marijuana arrestsThe New Inquiry, sociologist Harry Levine explains the terrible mechanics propelling apartheid-style law enforcement in America:

Police arrest mostly young and low-income men for marijuana possession, disproportionately blacks and Latinos. In the last 15 years, police and sheriff ’s departments in every major U.S. city and county have made over 10 million of these possession arrests. Most people arrested were not smoking. They were carrying tiny amounts.

Police make so many because they are relatively safe and easy arrests. All police have arrest quotas and often they can earn overtime pay by making a marijuana arrest toward the end of a shift. The arrests show productivity. Making many low-level arrests of all kinds is very good for training rookie police who gain experience doing many stops and searches of teenagers.

There is also a push nationally, to states, counties, and city police departments, to get as many new people as possible into the criminal databases.

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