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The Occult World of C.G. Jung

C. G. Jung in 1910.

C. G. Jung in 1910.

Via the Fortean Times:

He knew that inside the temple the mystery of his existence, of his purpose in life, would be answered. He was about to cross the threshold when he saw, rising up from Europe far below, the image of his doctor in the archetypal form of the King of Kos, the island site of the temple of Asclepius, Greek god of medicine. He told Jung that his departure was premature; many were demanding his return and he, the King, was there to ferry him back. When Jung heard this, he was immensely disappointed, and almost immediately the vision ended. He experienced the reluctance to live that many who have been ‘brought back’ encounter, but what troubled him most was seeing his doctor in his archetypal form. He knew this meant that the physician had sacrificed his own life to save Jung’s. On 4 April 1944 — a date numerologists can delight in — Jung sat up in bed for the first time since his heart attack.

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‘The Red Book': A Window Into Jung’s Dreams

By Karen Michel of NPR:

JungRedBook

Image at Right: Detail of an illustration of a solar barge on page 55 of Carl Jung’s Red Book.

The first words of Carl Gustav Jung’s Red Book are “The way of what is to come.”

What follows is 16 years of the psychoanalyst’s dive into the unconscious mind, a challenge to what he considered Sigmund Frued’s — his former mentor’s — isolated world view. Far from a simple narrative, the Red Book is Jung’s voyage of discovery into his deepest self.

The voyage began at age 11. “On my way to school,” Jung recalled in 1959, “I stepped out of a mist and I knew I am. I am what I am. And then I thought, ‘But what have I been before?’ And then I found that I had been in a mist, not knowing to differentiate myself from things; I was just one thing among many things.”

Thirty years later, Jung had a bookbinder make an enormous volume covered in red leather into which he poured his explorations into himself.

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