Tag Archives | reptiles

Lizard Men, Reptoids, and Sleestaks: The Fear and Awe of Reptilian Humanoids

PIC: SunofErat (CC)

PIC: SunofErat (CC)

Probably like a lot of you, I grew up fairly obsessed with dinosaurs. There’s something improbable about these things that appeal to the imagination of children. The idea that not terribly long ago the Earth was dominated by animals that mirror in so many ways the dragons and other monsters of myth and fairy tale is somewhat magical: It’s as if the grown-ups who taught us about dinosaurs- teachers, scientists and others – have said, “Dragons and ogres and trolls are all make-believe, but we’ve not taken away all the monsters. Take heart: Here’s a nice book full of ferocious-looking beasts that’s okay for you to believe in. Study, even.”

One of my first experiences with dinosaurs in pop culture was watching Sid and Marty Krofft’s live action Saturday morning children’s show The Land of the Lost, a series chronicling the adventures of patriarch Rick Marshall, and his children, Will and Holly, as they attempt to escape the titular Land of the Lost, a parallel dimension that they’ve been trapped in via some kind of mysterious portal encountered on a canoeing trip.… Read the rest

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Crop Circle Pre-Cog Dude Chillaxes with the Grasshopper People

grasshopperpeopleI must confess that as much as I read about things like crop circles and U.F.O.’s in my youth, I haven’t honestly kept tabs on much of it for the last decade. I suppose I just sort of hit a wall, or moreover, the whole thing strikes me like a plea from deep within us to explore genetics and psi phenomenon rather than our current consumerist/materialist obsessions, which are obviously a dead end. I’ve never read a single report about an abductee who claims that the “aliens” (don’t buy the extra-terrestrial hypothesis at all) gave any sort of flying fuck about all the fancy technology we’re so impressed with.

Anywho, this is the sort of story I always found the most fascinating in U.F.O. lore (recommended to me on Facebook, friend me) – the bizarro outlying stories which hint at the limitless potentiality of the human imagination. Like the guy from Holland who predicts crop circles in advance and hangs out with hilarious grasshopper people, who for some reason are quite fond of turtlenecks:

 

The awareness that a new crop circle is either forming (or is about to) at the precise moment Dutch medium Robbert van den Broeke “sees” in his “mind’s eye” either the pattern of the new crop circle and/or the exact field where it will be found has been carefully recorded every year since he was 15 years old (he is now 32).… Read the rest

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The Care and Maintenance of ‘Satan’

I used to have a terrible snake phobia. It took about a year of concentrated effort to rid myself of it. These days, I'm not afraid of snakes at all, with the exception of one particular snake known as "Satan". Satan is sixteen feet of very ill-tempered Burmese python that has become the unlikely mascot of YouTube program Snake Bytes TV. Check out Satan's care regimen for a taste of what the guys have to deal with on a regular basis.
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Extremely Tiny Chameleons Discovered In Madagascar

It’s hard to even fathom an imaginary creature as good this — presenting the world’s best animal, chameleons that lay golden eggs and can stand on a match tip, found on a remote, magical island. Via Wired:

Researchers have recently discovered four new chameleon species, which rank among the world’s tiniest reptiles. Adults are just over an inch from snout to tail. The smallest of the newly found species — Brookesia micra — live only on a small island called Nosy Hara.

chameleon

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Prehistoric Marine Reptile Fossil Found With Embryo Inside

PlesiosaurIt’s been a widely accepted fact that reptiles lay eggs. But did they always? New findings in a pleiosaurs’ fossil revealed that this marine reptile gave birth to live young. Via New Scientist:

Think less sea monsters, more doting parents: the long-necked plesiosaurs that roamed the seas during the dinosaur era gave birth to live young. They probably cared for their offspring and may even have lived in large social groups, like modern-day whales.

Plesiosaurs were reptiles, which as a group tend to lay eggs rather than giving birth. Other prehistoric marine reptiles were known to be exceptions to that rule, but until now fossil evidence that plesiosaurs did the same has been frustratingly elusive. “People have looked and looked,” says F. Robin O’Keefe of Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia.

Last year O’Keefe was called in to help prepare a fossil plesiosaur for display in the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

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