That was the starting topic of New York Times reporter Amy Harmon’s interview with Bina48, a cutting edge humanoid robot housed at the Terasem Movement Foundation in Vermont. There’s long way to go before robots develop the conversational skills necessary to blend in with the general public, although they could pass as disturbed weirdos — Bina48’s answers were often confusing, sometimes creepy, and occasionally cheeky.

Via h+ magazine:
Robot Expo

More than 100 university robotics labs around the world have created a giant robot expo online, including MIT, Cambridge, Carnegie-Mellon and Oxford.

It includes the University of Reading’s robot, which uses a biological brain, and humanoid robots from Osaka University, which can interact with humans.

The University of Michigan contributed its OmniTread snake robots, which can crawl through small holes, and the University of Zurich’s ECCEROBOT (funded by the EU) even has human-like cognition.

And the expo also features MIT’s robotic flower gardens and robot technology embedded into lamps and clothing, plus Leonardo, a socially intelligent animatronic robot capable of near-human facial expression that learns from natural human interaction.

From Engadget:

Hiroshi Ishiguro (or his evil android twin, one) is back in business, and nearly four years after his Geminoid HI-1 startled youngsters everywhere, the Geminoid-F has arrived to consternate the grown-ups. Shown off this weekend in Osaka, Japan, the lifelike lady you see above (pictured left, just in case you were wondering) was designed to mimic human facial expressions that are fed in to its internal computer. The rubberized face has a rather insane amount of flexibility, enabling it to pull off subtle gestures that have thus far been impossible to replicate on a robot.