What kind of person beats up a robot? MIT Technology Review reports that it’s not at all uncommon: As you probably know by now, HitchBot—a device made of pool noodles, rubber gloves, a…

[Editor’s Note: This article may contain spoilers.] Most of the time, I couldn’t care less about a computer’s feelings. I distrust them, frequently cuss at them, and occasionally smash them to pieces….

Remember Asimo (not to be confused with Awesome-O), Honda’s strange little robot from a few years back? Well, it’s back, and man, has it got some moves… Read all about the new…

In ten years, how will the machines that run your daily existence respond when confronted with life-or-death decisions? Matthieu Cherubini at the Royal College of Art offers prototypes of Humanist, Protector, and Profit-Based moral parameters for self-driving cars:

Many car manufacturers are projecting that by 2025 most cars will operate on driveless systems. How can such systems be designed to accommodate the complicatedness of ethical and moral reasoning? Just like choosing the color of a car, ethics can become a commodified feature in autonomous vehicles that one can buy, change, and repurchase, depending on personal taste.

Three distinct algorithms have been created – each adhering to a specific ethical principle/behaviour set-up – and embedded into driverless virtual cars that are operating in a simulated environment, where they will be confronted with ethical dilemmas.