Tag Archives | schizophrenia

Magick is All in My Head? Think Again!

sacredsigilsservitor3Okay, so you’re probably getting bored with hearing about my book (The Galactic Dialogue: Occult Initiations, out now!) at this point, so this will be the second to last in my five part series (symbolizing the five sides of the pentagram) of posts on it. Of course last week if you were watching you heard me rant about my “Summoning my Holy Guardian Angel/Alien Contact” experience, but that is only one of many ultra-strange tales contained in the living book’s pages. This might be the strangest. It’s funny but when critics tell me that magick is crazy, I say “exactly.” When they say that it’s just my imagination, I say “precisely the point.” Materialist science still hasn’t explained what the hell is going on with things like schizophrenia. (Why do nearly all schizophrenics see daemons?) Furthermore, the boundaries of the human imagination have yet to be explored or defined.

But when critics say that it’s all in my head I have to resoundingly say, well, no.… Read the rest

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Reconciling hallucinations in the locus of misfortune

People who suffer from schizophrenic symptoms are finding new ways of coping. Here is one such person who finds that hallucinations of angry voices can be a way to notice problems in their life.


The research of Dr. T. M. Luhrmann has found that Americans often suffer from distressing voices related to war and conflict.

Does culture make a difference to schizophrenic symptoms?


Organizations like Hearing Voices Network are experimenting with new ways of living with schizophrenic symptoms as opposed to trying to exorcise them away.


Dr. Arthur Hastings describes the use of the psychomanteum for bereavement. This use of a mirror angled in such a way that the user doesn’t see their own reflection can reconcile people to their lost loved ones and meditate on concepts of togetherness.


Dr. Jeffrey J. Kripal argues that there is a kinship between these experiences and writing itself:


Are we in a renaissance that is radically altering our perception of imagination in relation to objective truths?… Read the rest

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Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder associated with dendritic spine loss in brain

via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Science Daily:

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both appear to be associated with dendritic spine loss in the brain, suggesting the two distinct disorders may share common pathophysiological features, write author Glenn T. Konopaske, M.D., and colleagues at McLean Hospital, Belmont, Mass., and Harvard Medical School, Boston.

The dendritic spines play a role in a variety of brain functions. Previous studies have observed spine loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (DLPFCs) from individuals with schizophrenia (SZ). To determine whether spine pathology happens in individuals with a disorder distinct from SZ, the authors included patients with bipolar (BP) disorder in their study. SZ and BP differ clinically but they share many features.

The authors analyzed postmortem human brain tissue from 14 individuals with SZ, nine individuals with BP and 19 unaffected control group individuals.

Average spine density was reduced in individuals with BP (by 10.5 percent) and in individuals with SZ (by 6.5 percent) compared with control patients, although the reduction in individuals with SZ just missed significance.

Read the rest
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Epigenetic Tie to Neuropsychiatric Disorders Found

2D structure of neurotransmitter dopamine. Created with BKChem and Extensible SVG Optimiser

2D structure of neurotransmitter dopamine. Created with BKChem and Extensible SVG Optimiser

Could this discovery lead to the end of “treating” mental illness through the endless prescribing of psychiatric drugs?

Via ScienceDaily:

Dysfunction in dopamine signaling profoundly changes the activity level of about 2,000 genes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and may be an underlying cause of certain complex neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, according to UC Irvine scientists.

This epigenetic alteration of gene activity in brain cells that receive this neurotransmitter showed for the first time that dopamine deficiencies can affect a variety of behavioral and physiological functions regulated in the prefrontal cortex.

The study, led by Emiliana Borrelli, a UCI professor of microbiology & molecular genetics, appears online in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

“Our work presents new leads to understanding neuropsychiatric disorders,” Borrelli said. “Genes previously linked to schizophrenia seem to be dependent on the controlled release of dopamine at specific locations in the brain.

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Published Paper Blames Schizophrenia on Demons

DemonDemonic possession? Sure. That won’t play into the delusions of schizophrenics…

IS SCHIZOPHRENIA CAUSED by demons? A Turkish researcher seems to think so, and his article on the topic was just published in the Journal of Religion and Health, a scientific journal owned by Springer, a German-based publishing company.

The first two-thirds of M. Kemal Irmak’s paper, “Schizophrenia or Possession?”, read normally enough. You learn about the devastating symptoms of schizophrenia, current treatment approaches, and the nature of the delusions and hallucinations that schizophrenics experience. And then you arrive at this little doozy:

“One approach to this hallucination problem is to consider the possibility of a demonic world.”

The abrupt transition from established science to outlandish woo is positively comical. And once the quackery starts, it doesn’t stop. You’re first treated to a background on all things demonic:

In our region, demons are believed to be intelligent and unseen creatures that occupy a parallel world to that of mankind.

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Eye-Movement Test Accurately Indicates Schizophrenics

Pic: Vitold Muratov (CC)

Pic: Vitold Muratov (CC)

A recent study proposes that we may be able to use current technology to identify schizophrenics without spending the copious resources for a qualified neuropsychologist to diagnose an individual case.  What implications can this have for pilot licensing, holding government office, police recruiting, and generally the overall stigma associated with individuals who are functioning and non-functioning clinical schizophrenics?

A group of scientists from Scotland, Germany, and the USA recruited schizophrenic patients from mental hospitals in Munich, Germany and Aberdeen, Scotland. The researchers confirmed schizophrenia by diagnostic procedures in the DSM-IV as well as case history.  Control group participants were recruited from the area surrounding University of Aberdeen, excluding people with a history of alcohol abuse/dependence, major head trauma involving loss of consciousness for more than 5 minutes, epilepsy or other neurological dysfunction, and first-degree family history of psychosis.

Using infrared eye-tracking technology via the EyeLink I and a 19” video screen, the study tested visual patterns in smooth pursuit of a moving object for 20 seconds, fixation stability on the same stationary object, and free-viewing of photographs including:

“Luminance-balanced natural and man made environments showing information at different spatial scales; everyday objects and food in sparse and cluttered scenes; expressive, neutral, and occluded faces; animals; and unfamiliar computer-generated images (fractal patterns, gray-scale ‘pink noise.'”

The conclusion brought by the research is that schizophrenic individuals clearly lack an ability to perform visual tests the same as control individuals.  Diagnosed schizophrenics cannot accurately pursue an object with a smooth speed and path or concentrate with normal patterns when steadily gazing at the photographs presented.… Read the rest

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Driver Killed After Ramming White House Gates Believed Obama Was Electronically Monitoring Her

miriam careyThe tragic death of a young woman struggling with mental health issues apparently was inspired by a chilling, very contemporary schizophrenic delusion: that she was trapped in a reality television show under the surveillance of Barack Obama. ABC News writes:

The woman who led police on a high-speed chase near the U.S. Capitol before being shot dead had a history of mental illness and believed President Obama was electronically monitoring her Connecticut home in order to broadcast her life on television, sources said.

Miriam Carey, a dental hygienist from Stamford, Conn., was killed by police [a week ago] after trying to ram a White House gate and leading cops on a chase down Pennsylvania Avenue with her 1-year-old daughter in the car.

According to sources Carey believed she was capable of communicating with Obama. According to sources, Carey had a family history of schizophrenia and was taking medication for a mental illness.

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I Talk to My Haircut

I have no idea what this is all about but I can tell you this:  The Reverend Fred Lane is either a mad genius or in need of serious psychiatric medication. His album From the One That Cut You is loaded with dada/surreal/ schizophrenic lyrics sung over equally unstable and psychotic R&B music. Just look at the cover alone:  the crazy writing, band-aids, dinosaur glasses, and handlebar mustache. Hear the madness for yourself.  Here's I Talk to My Haircut.
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Schizophrenia Experiment Produces First Repeatable Out-of-Body Experience in the Laboratory

Rubber HandVia ScienceDaily:
A study using a procedure called the rubber hand illusion has found striking new evidence that people experiencing schizophrenia have a weakened sense of body ownership and has produced the first case of a spontaneous, out-of-body experience in the laboratory. These findings suggest that movement therapy, which trains people to be focused and centered on their own bodies, including some forms of yoga and dance, could be helpful for many of the 2.2 million people in the United States who suffer from this mental disorder. The study, which appears in the Oct. 31 issue of the scientific journal Public Library of Science One, measured the strength of body ownership of 24 schizophrenia patients and 21 matched control subjects by testing their susceptibility to the "rubber hand illusion" or RHI. This tactile illusion, which was discovered in 1998, is induced by simultaneously stroking a visible rubber hand and the subject's hidden hand.
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