Tag Archives | Science and the Afterlife Experience

PZ Myers Calls Eben Alexander’s Visions Brain-Damaged ‘Bullshit’

Harvard-educated neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander woke up one morning with a bad case of E. Coli eating his brain. Before he could say “alakazam,” his neocortex had shut down completely, while his incorporeal body was whisked away on butterfly wings into the depths of the Infinite Beyond. He saw visions, was given messages, and upon returning to consciousness, wrote down his story, which he summarized for Newsweek.

Upon reading this account, blogging biologist and professional party-pooper PZ Myers basically accuses Dr. Alexander of being retarded.  Relishing in his contempt for any Swedenborgian realities that may lie beyond atoms and the void, Myers wipes his ass with Newsweek on his famous science blog Pharyngula:

I’ve got to wonder who is responsible for this nonsense, and how it gets past the staff at Newsweek. Every once in a while, they’ve just got to put up a garish cover story touting the reality of Christian doctrine, and invariably, the whole story is garbage.

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Reincarnation as a Plausible Explanation

One of the things that surprised me most about attending the Parapsychological Association conference in Durham, North Carolina this year was how areas of science that receive the most criticism for being 'pseudo-scientific' are, in some cases, areas where the very basic elements, the most elegant elements, of the scientific method can be explored. Dr. Robert Almeder, Georgia State University, wrote the introduction to Chris Carter's new book Science and the Afterlife Experience, from Inner Traditions/Bear & Co., and he speaks here of the Dr. Ian Stevensen's research at the Univ. of Virginia on cases in which the data seems to point to reincarnation as a plausible explanation. Rather than scoffing and dismissing this outright, Dr. Almeder presents a provocative argument for why such investigations fit very soundly within the scientific milieu.
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