Tag Archives | Science Fiction

“How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart Two Days Later” by Philip K. Dick, 1978

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Philip k dick drawing” by Pete Welsch from Washington, DC, USA – Philip K Dick. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Via Deoxy.org

by Philip K. Dick 1978

First, before I begin to bore you with the usual sort of things science fiction writers say in speeches, let me bring you official greetings from Disneyland. I consider myself a spokesperson for Disneyland because I live just a few miles from it—and, as if that were not enough, I once had the honor of being interviewed there by Paris TV.

For several weeks after the interview, I was really ill and confined to bed. I think it was the whirling teacups that did it. Elizabeth Antebi, who was the producer of the film, wanted to have me whirling around in one of the giant teacups while discussing the rise of fascism with Norman Spinrad… an old friend of mine who writes excellent science fiction.… Read the rest

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Astronomers spot clouds on Mars: Is the U.S. Government terraforming the red planet?

Via Shepard Ambellas at Intellihub:

Cloud-like formations were originally spotted within the atmosphere of Mars by astronomers in 2012, leading some to believe the planet may be habitable or is being transformed in some way to make it so.

In fact images show the vapor formation to be over 621 miles across, which is larger than any other formation previously spotted within the red planet’s atmosphere to date.

A planetary scientist with the European Space Agency says this “raises more questions than answers”.

Damien Peach, an astronomer said, “I noticed this projection sticking out of the side of the planet. To begin with, I thought there was a problem with the telescope or camera. But as I checked more of the images, I realized it was a real feature – and it was quite a surprise.”

According to reports the haze lasted about 10-days before reemerging about 30-days later as it appears these new clouds are beginning to form in a more consistent manner than ever before, bringing only one thing to mind — the 1990 science fiction film Total Recall starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.

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Ridley Scott Will Produce Arthur C. Clarke’s ‘3001: The Final Odyssey’ TV Miniseries

Fans of Stanley Kubrick’s classic movie adaption of Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey may – or may not – be thrilled that a sequel is coming courtesy of Syfy and Ridley Scott’s Scott Free Productions. From Deadline.com:

Forty six years after the release of Stanley Kubrick’s groundbreaking 2001: A Space Odyssey, the final book in Arthur C. Clarke’s Odyssey series is getting a screen adaptation. Syfy has put in development 3001: The Final Odyssey, a miniseries based on the fourth and final Odyssey book. The deal comes on the heels of Syfy recently greenlighting a miniseries adaptation of another Clarke classic, Childhood’s End.

3001-syfy

3001, from Scott Free Prods. and Warner Horizon TV, is described as an epic story of a man lost in time and dark thematic meditations on the final fate of all Humankind, It begins with the discovery of Frank Poole’s frozen body, floating in space, and resolves the tale that started in 2001: A Space Odyssey

[continues at Deadline.com]

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William Gibson interview: time travel, virtual reality, and his new book

William Gibson (CC by-sa 2.0)

William Gibson (CC by-sa 2.0)

via The Verge:

Our geography is dissolving into the digital.

Science fiction author William Gibson’s work, from cyberpunk classic Neuromancer to his more recent, less overtly futuristic novels, is usually more concerned with smart cultural analysis than plotting the mechanics of new technology. Gibson has given us a lens to see everything from high fashion to virtual reality, coining the term “cyberspace” to refer to what would soon become a ubiquitous computer network in the real world (“And they won’t let me forget it,” he quipped after being introduced with that factoid in the TV show Wild Palms.)

But time travel is one of the most mechanical genres around — not necessarily in scientific rationale, but in the rigorous attempt to fit together pieces of the past, present, and future without leaving loose ends or, at worst, unresolved paradoxes. And Gibson’s latest novel, The Peripheral, fits at least a few of its tropes.

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[Rap News] The Singularity – feat. Ray Kurzweil & Alex Jones

“Today we travel into the pure world of sci-fi to investigate the much vaunted, mysterious potential future event known as ‘The Singularity’. What will a machine consciousness mean for humanity? What are the ethical, political, military and philosophical implications of strong A.I.? And what would an AI sound like when spitting rhymes over a dope beat? All this and more shall be revealed in Rap News 28: The Singularity – featuring a special appearance from famed technocrat, futurist and inventor, Ray Kurzweil, in full TED talk mode; everyone’s favourite warmonger, General Baxter; and we welcome back the dauntless info warrior Alex Jones, who last made an appearance in RN6. Join Robert Foster on this epic Sci-Fi quest into the future/past of humanity.”

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Author Ray Bradbury’s Sci-Fi Art Collection Up for Auction

The cover illustration from Bradbury's acclaimed novel, Fahrenheit 451, now up for auction. Credit: Nate D. Sanders auction

The cover illustration from Bradbury’s acclaimed novel, Fahrenheit 451, now up for auction.
Credit: Nate D. Sanders auction

If only I had extra money like that lying around..

via Live Science:

Fans of the renowned American author Ray Bradbury take note: The writer’s personal collection of sci-fi memorabilia and art is now being auctioned off online.

Bradbury is best known for his 1953 dystopian masterpiece, “Fahrenheit 451,” as well as a collection of short stories about a human colony on Mars, called “The Martian Chronicles,” published in 1950. For decades, he worked in Hollywood, where his writing was adapted for television, the big screen and comic books.

Bradbury died in 2012 at the age of 91, leaving behind a huge collection of art and memorabilia inspired by space, science fiction and fantasy. Among the items up for sale are the original-concept drawings and illustrations for many of Bradbury’s novels and short stories, most of them by Joseph Mugnaini, Bradbury’s longtime collaborator.

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Romancing the Biomechanoid: H.R. Giger’s “San Gottardo”

News keeps coming down the vine about lesser known projects H.R. Giger had left unfinished before his recent passing. The latest is a little-known science fiction movie idea called The Mystery of San Gottardo, which he was working on since the 1970’s. “A unique love story… about a man and his love for a freak of nature, Armbeinda, which is really a sentient limb combining an arm and a leg.”

This is why we love Giger.

A 1994 magazine called Cinefantastique goes into more detail:

The story concerns a race of biomechanoids created by a military organization. The premise: your arms and legs are slaves that do your bidding, but what if they have a mind of their own and were set free? Ink drawings depict the disembodied parts attacking their creator (Giger’s self-portrait) in the San Gottardo border tunnel which links Switzerland and Italy. To insure that his vision remains intact, Giger hopes to retain creative control as a producer on the film… and not be forced to rely on CGI.

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Erik Davis on VALIS, P.K.D. and High Weirdness

APhilipKDickMomentAs part of the inaugural reread series on Reality Sandwich, Erik Davis, author ofTechGnosis and Nomad Codes, spoke with me recently about the “High Weirdness” of Philip K. Dick and the postmodern pink-gnosis of VALIS, a partly autobiographic scifi novel where Dick literally wrote himself into fiction, and, as it were, “hacked the Hero’s Journey” (1).  Erik tells us about how he first discovered Dick’s work when he was no pop culture icon but a pulp cult underground writer.

VALIS is loaded with half-fiction, half-truth narratives told by a multitude of personas. Philip K. Dick. Phil Dick. Horselover Fat. As Erik Davis will tell us, there is a method to this madness, PKD was always more than one author, and Dick may have ended up writing himself (2).

Just watch your step through the hallucinatory fiction this side of Chapel Perilous.

J: While doing some research myself, I noticed in this article you mention studying Philip K.Read the rest

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