Tag Archives | Science & Technology

How Hacktivists Will Break Corporate Control of Information Within a Decade


Jake Anderson via Activist Post:

Sci-fi author and information rights activist Cory Doctorow appeared out of the dusty heat of the 2015 Burning Man in a gray jumpsuit and a pair of Adbusters Black Spot sneakers. In his hand he held a small black moleskin, which he glanced at intermittently while delivering an electrifying, albeit head-spinning talk on the future of the Internet of Things.

Doctorow, who recently re-joined the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), contextualized theInternet of Things as an information rights struggle that requires an end to patent laws that forbid jailbreaking digital locks. Concordantly, he and the EFF have an ambitious plan: To dismantle the draconian Digital Rights Management (DRM) laws currently protected by the DMCA Section 1201. Doctorow and the EFF seek to counter this oppressive legislation with the Apollo 1201 initiative, by which they will strategically pick cases that can clearly demonstrate Congress violated the Constitution when it passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in 1998.

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How Sacred Science Addresses What Modern Physics Ignores

Tom Bunzel via Collective Evolution:

In a recent attempt to understand how conventional physics “explains” reality, I began to read Lawrence Krauss’ A Universe from Nothing

Krauss is one of those famous scientists like Richard Dawkins who doesn’t find anything strange about the fact that existence IS.

Instead he takes EVERYTHING for granted and attacks, like Dawkins and Bill Maher, the low hanging fruit of organized religion and its dogmatic, unproven Gods created in our image.

When I tried reading his book I got a bit frustrated and then checked the index for the word “consciousness,” and when I did not find it, I put the book aside.

The question really is – “what” exactly is “nothing.”

First and foremost it is a concept.  Nothing does not exist.  What exists is, well, everything.

Nothing is the word or placeholder we use for null – similar to zero in math – but in both cases (words and math) they are human abstractions or interpretations of Nature. 

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Air France Executives Attacked as Carrier Cuts 2,900 Jobs

Airbus | A380-861 | Air France | F-HPJJ | Hong Kong | HKG | VHHH
Mathieu Rosemain via Bloomberg:

Air France executives were forced to flee with their clothes in tatters after workers stormed a meeting at Charles de Gaulle airport in protest at 2,900 planned job cuts.

Human resources chief Xavier Broseta and Pierre Plissonnier, head of long-haul flights, scaled an eight-foot fence to escape, aided by security guards. Broseta emerged shirtless and Plissonnier had his suit ripped to shreds.

Violence erupted Monday as Air France told its works council that 300 pilots, 900 flight attendants and 1,700 ground staff might have to go after failed productivity talks with flight crew. The protest, in which agitators chanted “naked, naked,” is just the latest to turn physical in France, where managers at Michelin & Cie. and Sony Corp. have been held hostage over firings, irate farmers have blocked city streets with tractors and manure and more than 100 Uber Technologies Inc. taxis have been smashed up by rival drivers.

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‘Citizen Kane’ to ‘Call of Duty’: The rise of video games in universities


Dead Bug Creek, Ashley Pinnick’s final project

Jessica Conditt via engadget:

Picture an art school. Visualize the hallways of a university dedicated to the arts, the classrooms lined with paint tubes, charcoal sticks and nude models. Imagine the galleries where outgoing seniors present their final projects. Consider the thick-framed glasses that sit atop students’ noses as they sketch, sculpt, write and design the things that lurk in their wildest daydreams. Now picture a creation so strange that the school’s professors aren’t sure how to critique it from an artistic angle, let alone how to assign it a grade.

In Pasadena, California, Art Center College of Design graduate Ashley Pinnick faced this problem in her last semester, with her final project: a video game.

Specifically, Pinnick’s project was a quirky exploration game for Oculus’ VR headset called Dead Bug Creek. It was wildly different from her peers’ creations in the Illustration degree program, but not because it was more experimental or nonsensical: It was the only video game on display because Art Center didn’t have a technical video game development program.

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Chocolate Nam

Sometimes, a ride just speaks for itself. Meet Chocolate Nam…

Choc Nam

It’s mid-day and I’m cruisin’ Haight-Ashbury. The sun is high and it is yet another perfect, beautiful San Francisco day. (Yawn.) The street is bustling with thrift store shoppers, retail workers and mid-western tourists congregating for snaps of themselves flashing peace signs below the famous intersecting street signage that marks this infamous corner. Post-selfie, it’s on to gawk at all the 60’s memorabilia glowing in black lights, as bongs and tie-dye emanate psychedelic from a multitude of head shops. And with leashed cats on their shoulders and unleashed pit-bulls at their sides, dirty-colorful neo-hippie runaways hawk pot vivacious to all that pass.

I drive past… and am immediately struck by the vision of an older black man at the peak of fashion, as he hobbles into the street to flag me with his black and silver-gilt cane on high.… Read the rest

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Invisibility Cloak Still ‘Coming Soon’

Stories about forthcoming (but never appearing) Harry Potter-style invisibility cloaks have been a staple in the media for several years. Reuters reports that it’s the turn of the Materials Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to wind us up with yet another “coming soon”:

A cloak of invisibility may be common in science fiction but it is not so easy in the real world. New research suggests such a device may be moving closer to reality.

Light reflects off the cloak (red arrows) as if it were reflecting off a flat mirror in this 3D illustration of a metasurface skin cloak made from an ultrathin layer of nanoantennas (gold blocks) covering an arbitrarily shaped object is shown in this handout image courtesy of REUTERS/XIANG ZHANG GROUP/LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY/HANDOUT

Light reflects off the cloak (red arrows) as if it were reflecting off a flat mirror in this 3D illustration of a metasurface skin cloak made from an ultrathin layer of nanoantennas (gold blocks) covering an arbitrarily shaped object is shown in this handout image courtesy of REUTERS/XIANG ZHANG GROUP/LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY/HANDOUT


Scientists said on Thursday they have successfully tested an ultra-thin invisibility cloak made of microscopic rectangular gold blocks that, like skin, conform to the shape of an object and can render it undetectable with visible light.

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Psy-Op: Executive Order Creates an Orwellian Policy of Enlightenment and Propaganda


This article originally appeared on Activist Post.

By Daisy Luther

The ink is still wet on a brand new executive order that reads like a cross between the Reich’s Ministry of Enlightenment and Propaganda and George Orwell’s Ministry of Truth.

Of course, in true propagandist form, President Obama isn’t calling it anything related to Nazi Germany or a dystopian novel.   He’s calling it “Using Behavioral Science Insights to Better Serve the American People.”

To-may-to. To-mah-to.

Whatever you want to call it, prepare to be the subject of manipulation and behavioral experiments. This is a giant, official national psy-op and they’re announcing to us that they’re doing it.

What’s a Psy-Op?

Psychological Operations or PSYOP are planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of organizations, groups, and individuals. (source)

(You can learn more about the use of Psy-Ops in this US Army procedural manual.)

The beginning of the Executive Order explains:

A growing body of evidence demonstrates that behavioral science insights — research findings from fields such as behavioral economics and psychology about how people make decisions and act on them — can be used to design government policies to better serve the American people.

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The A=432 Hz Frequency: DNA Tuning and the Bastardization of Music


Brendan D. Murphy via Waking Times:

GA=440Hz: Not Quite Music to My Ears

Humankind is the largely unwitting victim of afrequency war on our consciousness that has been waged for decades, if not millennia. The goal has clearly been to keep us as gullible and subservient as possible, through multifarious means.

In modern history in particular, there has been what Dr. Len Horowitz has referred to as the strategic “militarization” of music. This happened in 1939 when the tuning of the note ‘A above Middle C’ to 440 Hz was adopted in the world of music. In 1910 an earlier push to effect the same change was met with limited success. Three decades later, the British Standards Institute (BSI) adopted the A=440Hz standard following staunch promotion by the Rockefeller-Nazi consortium—“at the precise time WWII preparations were being finalized by the petrochemical-pharmaceutical war financiers.”[i] This was the year that A=440 became the international standard.

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Why hasn’t anyone been “back to” the Moon?

In an essay from a few years ago that is sure to rankle many a reader (but not you, Gentle Disinfonauts—you’re what the kids call ‘open-minded,’ of this I am sure) and stick in the craw of every Official Story™ adherent, conspiracy researcher Dave McGowan ponders why we haven’t returned to the Moon. (And of course, by that extension, the question of why hasn’t anyone else been to the Moon should irritate the linings of your mind like a bad rash.)

We're #1!

We’re #1!

Grab your tin foil hat and let’s get lunar, folks:

Anyway, as I noted in the last Apollo post, “whenever NASA types talk about going ‘back’ to the Moon,” they invariably seem to “unintentionally raise questions about the legitimacy of the Apollo missions.” And sure enough, the boys over at Lockheed Martin (one of NASA’s longtime partners-in-crime) certainly didn’t let me down in that regard with this latest proposal.

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Will Your Car Obey You or the Police?

Early Self-Driving Car

Philippe Gastonne via The Daily Bell:

A few lines in a seemingly routine RAND Corp. report on the future of technology and law enforcement last week raised a provocative question: Should police have the power to take control of a self-driving car?

Human drivers are required to pull over when a police officer gestures for them to do so. It’s reasonable to expect that self-driving cars would do the same. To look at it another way: Self-driving cars are programmed to stop at red lights and stop signs. Surely they should also be programmed to stop when a police officer flags them down. It is, after all, the law.

It’s clear, then, that police officers should have some power over the movements of self-driving cars. What’s less clear is where to draw the line. If a police officer can command a self-driving car to pull over for his own safety and that of others on the road, can he do the same if he suspects the passenger of a crime?

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