Tag Archives | Science

Mystery: Have you heard The Hum?

Screenshot of The World Hum Map and Database by Glen MacPhearson, British Columbia.

Screenshot of The World Hum Map and Database by Glen MacPhearson, British Columbia.

Disinfo has covered the mysterious hum before (here and here). But Policy.Mic has a write-up and I thought that the Disinfo community might like to read more about this fascinating phenomena. It appears that scientists are as baffled as ever.

via Policy.Mic (follow link to read the entire article):

Dr. Glen MacPherson doesn’t remember the first time he heard the sound. It may have started at the beginning of 2012, a dull, steady droning like that of a diesel engine idling down the street from his house in the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia. A lecturer at the University of British Columbia and high school teacher of physics, mathematics and biology, months passed before MacPherson realized that the noise, which he’d previously dismissed as some background nuisance like car traffic or an airplane passing overhead, was something abnormal.

“Once I realized that this wasn’t simply the ambient noise of living in my little corner of the world, I went through the typical stages and steps to try to isolate the sources,” MacPherson told Mic.

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What type of music makes you feel most powerful?

Music lesson: teacher (right, inscription: ΣΜΙΚΥΔΟΣ) and his student (left, ΕΥΔΥΜΙΔΕΣ). Between them, a boy (ΤΛΕΜΠΟΜΕΝΟΣ) narrates a text. Attic red-figure hydria, ca. 510 BC. From Vulci. via Wikimedia Commons.

Music lesson: teacher (right, inscription: ΣΜΙΚΥΔΟΣ) and his student (left, ΕΥΔΥΜΙΔΕΣ). Between them, a boy (ΤΛΕΜΠΟΜΕΝΟΣ) narrates a text. Attic red-figure hydria, ca. 510 BC. From Vulci. via Wikimedia Commons.

Aside from the science, what kind of music do you think makes you feel most powerful?

via Psyblog:

Now a new study finds that music of the right kind can transform the listener’s sense of power.

The study, published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, was inspired by the pre-game routines of athletes (Hsu et al., 2014).

Dennis Hsu, who led the study, explains:

“When watching major sports events, my coauthors and I frequently noticed athletes with their earphones on while entering the stadium and in the locker room.

The ways these athletes immerse themselves in the music — some with their eyes steely shut and some gently nodded along to the beats — it seems as if the music is mentally preparing and toughening them up for the competition about to occur.”

But which type of music is best for boosting your power and what is it about that music that makes you feel powerful?

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The Secret Science Boards of TED And The Question of Consciousness

TED_CensorshipThere’s a shadowy group lurking in the squeaky clean corridors of the scientific information conglomerate known as TED. Here in the cockles of this monolithic shaft of Copernican cocksuredness hides a gloaming collection of secret scientists who decide the fate of the information you’re allowed to hear. They have no name, so we shall call them the Anonymous Society of Scientist (A.S.S. for short). We may have never known of A.S.S.’s existence if not for the hell raised over the removal of two popular TEDx Whitechapel speeches by Scientist, Dr. Rupert Sheldrake and best-selling author, Graham Hancock.

Both Dr. Sheldrake and Graham Hancock’s talks revolved around the idea that consciousness is not necessarily limited to the physical human body, but that it may extend far beyond in ways not yet fully understood. In light of the present paradigm of scientific thought which supposes we are actually “lumbering robots” as Richard Dawkins famously stated, the contrarian claims of Sheldrake and Hancock are not considered suitable for public consumption – so think the veiled harbingers of A.S.S.… Read the rest

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Used Cigarette Butts Can Be Turned into Electrical Storage

Carp with a cigarette butt Wouter Hagens, via Wikimedia Commons

Carp with a cigarette butt Wouter Hagens, via Wikimedia Commons

This coupled with cannabis-based batteries? I approve.

via Popsci:

The electrical power of the future just might be waiting in ashtrays across the world. Researchers in South Korea discovered that, with a one-step conversion process, cigarette filters turn into great supercapacitors. This is great news for anyone who wants new electronics that smell like Bourbon Street at 3 A.M.

Supercapacitors are an electrical storage alternative to batteries. In batteries, energy is stored in chemical reactants, while in supercapacitors, it’s stored as an electrical field between materials. Batteries are slow to charge and heavy, but they’re also compact and store great amounts of energy, which means they’ve long held an advantage in consumer products. But supercapacitors work where space constraints matter less: Braking in a car generates a lot of electricity, and in some cars supercapacitors capture that energy and then release it to get the car going again.

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Cognitive Benefits of Lucid Dreaming

Sleep and His Half Brother Death. John William Waterhouse, 1874.

Sleep and His Half Brother Death. John William Waterhouse, 1874.

I’ve only had a couple lucid dreams myself.

via Psyblog:

People who realise they are in a dream while they are dreaming — a lucid dream — have better problem-solving abilities, new research finds.

This may be because the ability to step outside a dream after noticing it doesn’t make sense reflects a higher level of insight.

Around 82% of people are thought to have experienced a lucid dream in their life, while the number experiencing a lucid dream at least once a month may be as high as 37%.

Flash of insight

The study, published in the journal Dreaming, recruited participants into three groups (Bourke & Shaw, 2014):

  • Frequent lucid dreamers: those who experienced a lucid dream more than once a month.
  • Occasional lucid dreamers: those who had had a lucid dream at least once in their lives.
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Freemason, Scholar and Master Builder, Randall Carlson (Part 2)

Via Midwest Real 

(This is part 2, click here for part 1).

IMG_1109

I love conversations like this because they remind us that there are truly massive, un-fuckwithable forces at play in the universe that could crush us in an instant. Why would I like such a thing? It helps me remember to be humble, not take my own personal nonsense too seriously, and to enjoy the shit out of life.

So, until the asteroids hit, (real, or metaphorical) do awesome things, and for God’s sake, remember to check your ego every now and then. 

Anyway, there’s an esoteric library’s worth of information over at Sacred Geometry International. Literally hundreds of hours. Go there!

They also have tremendous Twitter and Facebook accounts.

We truly love your participation and support. Get involved by checking out our new sitefollowing us on Twitter, and Facebook and please subscribe and review on iTunes!Read the rest

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Man Has Tooth Pulled From Nose

Credit: Hamed O. Al Dhafeeri, Abdulmajid Kavarodi, Khalil Al Shaikh, Ahmed Bukhari, Omair Al Hussain, Ahmed El Baramawy. American Journal of Case Reports. Via Live Science

Credit: Hamed O. Al Dhafeeri, Abdulmajid Kavarodi, Khalil Al Shaikh, Ahmed Bukhari, Omair Al Hussain, Ahmed El Baramawy. American Journal of Case Reports. Via Live Science.

Man’s frequent nosebleeds caused by tooth inside his nasal cavity.

via Live Science:

Nosebleeds are common among children and young adults, but one young man’s frequent nosebleeds turned out to have a rather unusual cause: He had a tooth in his nose, according to a new report of his case.

After suffering from nosebleeds once or twice a month for three years, the 22-year-old man in Saudi Arabia consulted a doctor, who found an ivory-white, bony mass, about half an inch (1 centimeter) long in the man’s nose. The doctors then consulted with dentist colleagues, who concluded that the mass was actually an extra tooth that had somehow ended up growing in his nose, according to the report.

The patient had a well-aligned and complete set of teeth in his mouth, according to the report.

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Antidepressants May Affect Feelings of Love

Were their original feelings a product of their depression/anxiety? Are their new feelings a product of the antidepressants? Could their feelings be attributed to the natural ebb and flow of relationships?

via Live Science:

Taking antidepressants may affect people’s feelings of love and attachment, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that men’s feelings of love tended to be affected more than women’s by taking antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which work mainly through the serotonin system. In contrast, drugs called tricyclic antidepressants, which affect the serotonin system less, seem to affect women’s feelings of love more than men’s, the researchers said.

“The good news is that there are a variety of agents for treating depression,” said study author Dr. Hagop S. Akiskal, a distinguished professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

In the study, researchers compared the effects of SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants on the love lives of 192 people with depression — 123 women and 69 men — whose mean age was 41.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson: “GMO” Follow Up

Misunderstood scientist of the people or semantic sorcerer bought and Paid For? Recently I posted a video of  Tyson’s word on selective breeding. Well here is his follow up that he posted on Facebook. What is your input disinfonauts?

English: A warning sign with an exclamation markvia Facebook:

In fact — apart from my “chill out” quip in the video, which clearly deserved further explanation — I didn’t really vote one way or another on GMOs. You want to distinguish how genes are modified? Okay, then label everything, and create two subcategories of GMO. One that indicates laboratory and one that indicates agriculture. I said this explicitly in my Facebook post.

Furthermore, I never said GMOs were safer or more dangerous. I implied that if you think GMO-laboratory is **inherently** more dangerous to human life than GMO-agriculture you are simply wrong. They both can be bad for the environment. They both can be less healthy. They both can disrupt the local flora and fauna.

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Society Bloomed with Gentler Personalities, More Feminine Faces: Technology Boom 50,000 Years Ago Correlated with Less Testosterone

Photograph of "Minnesota Woman" unearthed in Otter Tail County, Minnesota in 1931.

Photograph of “Minnesota Woman” unearthed in Otter Tail County, Minnesota in 1931.

Are AndroGel and Axiron speeding the collapse of civilization?

Via ScienceDaily:

Modern humans appear in the fossil record about 200,000 years ago, but it was only about 50,000 years ago that making art and advanced tools became widespread.

A new study appearing Aug. 1 in the journal Current Anthropology finds that human skulls changed in ways that indicate a lowering of testosterone levels at around the same time that culture was blossoming.

“The modern human behaviors of technological innovation, making art and rapid cultural exchange probably came at the same time that we developed a more cooperative temperament,” said lead author Robert Cieri, a biology graduate student at the University of Utah who began this work as a senior at Duke University.

The study, which is based on measurements of more than 1,400 ancient and modern skulls, makes the argument that human society advanced when people started being nicer to each other, which entails having a little less testosterone in action.

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