Tag Archives | Science

Ever Rethinking the Lord’s Prayer: Buckminster Fuller Revises Scripture with Science

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via Brain Pickings:

A secular definition of divinity as a curiosity-driven love of truth bent through the prism of our subjective experience.

“Everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science,” Einstein wrote to a little girl who asked him whether scientists pray, “becomes convinced that some spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe, one that is vastly superior to that of man.” “The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive,” Carl Sagan seconded, “does a disservice to both.” And yet the oppression of religious doctrine over scientific thought has persisted for centuries, fromGalileo to some of today’s most celebrated minds.

In his 1981 classic Critical Path (public library), legendary architect, designer, inventor, theorist and futurist Buckminster Fuller (July 12, 1895–July 1, 1983) explores the subject with his singular blend of philosophical fringe-think, love of science, and cosmic poetics.… Read the rest

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The Last Thing They Ever Saw

You’ve probably heard the old wives’ tale of ‘The Image In A Dead Man’s Eye’ – the idea that the eye retains the last thing it sees before death.

…Isn’t it odd how obvious superstitions sometimes turn out to be completely true?

 

‘Optography’, or the art of recovering the last image seen by an eye, is a very real thing with a long and strange history:

(Video contains a number of actual images recovered from dead eyes)

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Your Food Is Always Outside Of You: Some Ideas About Space But Definitely Not Time

via Ian Kilgore’s blog:

Here’s the original abstract of the talk:

YOUR FOOD IS ALWAYS OUTSIDE OF YOU

(Some Ideas About Space But Definitely Not Time)

ABSTRACT:

I’m going to, in an accessible way, cover some mathematical and physical ideas that I think are important or at least pretty cool. (CHILL. OUT.) You probably spent a lot of time in grade school factoring polynomials or whatever. I don’t care about that. I want to talk about why orbits work, what happens in 5-D, why the World Series is slightly better than a coin toss, databases are broken forever, truth itself is wrong, and what happens if an infinite number of buses roll up at your house. Or some subset of that.

I’ll cover three or four discrete topics, so don’t worry if you get lost; you’ll be following along again in a few slides. Any equations will be supplementary only- you won’t have to understand them to get the general idea.

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Politics can interact with evolution to shape human destiny

Image from page 47 of "The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex" (1871)

Image from page 47 of “The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex” (1871)

Press Release via Eureka Alert:

Politics can have unintentional evolutionary consequences that may cause hastily issued policies to cascade into global, multigenerational problems, according to political scientists.

“Most western democracies look at policies as if they are bandages, we fix what we can and then move on,” said Pete Hatemi, associate professor of political science, Penn State. “But we need to consider generational policies so that we can fix what we can now, but also be prepared for what comes next.”

The researchers said that there is an interaction between political and cultural forces and evolutionary results. Genes can shape culture and political institutions, which in turn can shape biology and physiology, passing on certain traits to future generations. The environment’s influence on adaptation and how it changes biology is better known and often easier to observe, said Hatemi, but the way culture can affect gene expressions in future generations is often harder to show and may take longer to reveal itself.

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Costumes to Make Zombie Einstein Proud

Thinking about creating a costume relating to Anti-matter, the Holographic Universe, or Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle?

Well think therefore you are, right here [follow the link to read their descriptions].

Halloween_DarkEnergy

Choose from:

1. Dark Energy

2. Cosmic Inflation

3. Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

4. Bad Neutrino

5. Your Favorite Physics Experiment

6. Feynman diagram

7. Antimatter

8. Entangled particles

9. Holographic you(niverse)

10. Your favorite particle

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It’s Not Science Fiction, It’s Biomimicry– With Guest Dr. Michael Nosonovsky

Via Midwest Real

“In the first half of the 20th century, the prevailing idea was that humans could be masters of nature and the universe. We thought that human power was unlimited. We thought- ‘we can change rivers, we can move mountains,’ we can actually conquer nature. Then sometime in the second half of the 20th century, we made the realization that the relationship between nature and humans is actually much more complex than that.”  -Dr. Michael Nosonovsky.

ITUNES  STITCHER DOWNLOAD

IMG_6042If you love technology, congratulations! You’re living in what is, without a doubt, the most exciting time for it in human history. We’ve got self-driving cars, Oculus Rift, ubiquitous pocket-dwelling supercomputers and giant televisions in nearly every home. It’s almost enough to make you forget about ISIS, Ebola, killer asteroids and climate disaster.

Almost.

So let’s dampen the fear mongering feedback loop a bit further by jumping the technological brainwashing (I use that phrase with great affection) up a few notches.Read the rest

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Neal Stephenson: Innovation Starvation, the Next Generation

By Orin Zebest via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

By Orin Zebest via Flickr (CC by 2.0)

via Slate:

For a big part of my life, I assumed that the scarce resource—the thing that was preventing me from getting to Mars, or having my own personal jetpack—was clever ideas. Since I see myself as an idea person, that was a pleasant thing to believe. It’s flattering to think that you are one of the special few who hold the keys to the future. In the last decade and a half, though, I’ve spent a lot of time working in idea factories of various types, and I’ve come to see how wrong I was. I had fallen for a 19th-century vision of how it all works: the lone inventor sitting in the lobby of the patent office with his better mousetrap on his lap, waiting for the world to beat a path to his door. My thinking along those lines led to a 2011 piece titled “Innovation Starvation.” This led in turn to a partnership with Arizona State University to create Project Hieroglyph, which asked science fiction writers to help imagine new futures.

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Watch this Giant Red Leech Devour a Worm

“The leech sucks its prey down like spaghetti.”

The music really adds to the video.

via io9:

For the first time, filmmakers in the forests of Borneo’s Mount Kinabalu have documented the so-repulsive-it’s-captivating behavior of a large, red, worm-guzzling predator. While it remains unclassified by science, the animal is known to the area’s tribespeople, fittingly, as the “Giant Red Leech.”

Allow me to introduce this brief but unsettling clip, recently captured by BBC filmmakers for the new series ‘Wonders of the Monsoon,’ by stating the obvious: Nature can be gross. Some of us appreciate this fact more than others.

Read the entire write-up over at io9.

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