Tag Archives | Sea Level

Institute Pinpoints Which Cities May Be Consumed By Rising Sea Levels

If you’re planning on being cryogenically frozen and then revived in the 22nd century, consider selling your apartment in Tokyo now. New Scientist writes:

Sydney, Tokyo and Buenos Aires watch out. These cities will experience some of the greatest sea level rises by 2100, according to one of the most comprehensive predictions to date.

Sea levels have been rising for over 100 years – not evenly, though. Several processes are at work, says Mahé Perrette of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. Some land is sinking, some is rising. The gravitational pull of disappearing ice sheets lead to a fall in sea levels in their surrounding areas.

Perrette has modeled all of these effects and calculated local sea level rises in 2100 for the entire planet. The global average rise is predicted to be between 30 and 106 centimeters. Coasts around the Indian Ocean will be hard hit, as will Japan, south-east Australia and Argentina.

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Don’t Panic, But The Shoreline Is Moving Inland

For the first time in 6,000 years sea level is rising, causing the shoreline to move inland. The move will continue for at least 1,000 years. Unless we change the trend of the planet’s heat balance the pace of this movement will accelerate, with disastrous results. We are totally unprepared for this situation.

A week before superstorm Sandy hit New York City my new book High Tide On Main Street: Rising Sea Level and the Coming Coastal Crisis was released. In the book, I describe exactly such a storm hitting that location. The point of my description was to examine the factors that made New York City and the surrounding area particularly vulnerable.

With Sandy there were four things that combined to increase the impact. First there was incredible size of the storm with the unusual track of southeast to northwest. Second, it came at lunar high tide, which is about a foot higher than average;  third, sea level has risen about a foot in height over the last century;  fourth, the underwater topography off New York harbor amplified the storm surge.… Read the rest

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Low-Lying Pacific Islands ‘Growing Not Sinking’

Tv-mapNick Bryant writes for the BBC:

A new geological study has shown that many low-lying Pacific islands are growing, not sinking.

The islands of Tuvalu, Kiribati and the Federated States of Micronesia are among those which have grown, because of coral debris and sediment.

The study, featured in the magazine the New Scientist, predicts that the islands will still be there in 100 years’ time.

However it is still unsure whether many of them will be inhabitable.

In recent times, the inhabitants of many low-lying Pacific islands have come to fear their homelands being wiped off the map because of rising sea levels.

But this study of 27 islands over the last 60 years suggests that most have remained stable, while some have actually grown.

Using historical photographs and satellite imaging, the geologists found that 80% of the islands had either remained the same or got larger – in some cases, dramatically so.

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New York City’s Climate Change Plans

manhattan-under-water

Remember that Vanity Fair issue with all the photos of Manhattan partially submerged because of rising sea levels (example at right)? Well New York City is taking climate change seriously and has just issued the following press release detailing its preparations:

New York City is establishing itself as a global leader in forming a proactive response to climate change, reveals a new report detailing the city’s plans to adapt to the challenges and opportunities the changing climate presents. The plans, revealed in the first report of the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) and published in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, outline the measures the city will take to proactively respond to climate change in a way that will provide both long-term environmental, and short-term economic, benefits to the city.

“Cities are at the forefront of the battle against climate change. We are the source of approximately 80% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

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Ocean Floor Rising By 13 Feet Per Day In Australia

catoislandcoralseaFrom Ray Alex’s Website:

This is very disturbing. More and more things are happening that really shouldn’t. Is the 2012 events we are waiting for, starting already? The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has a Tsunami station in event mode activated for Station 55023 – STB Coral Sea located at 14.803 S 153.585 E (14°48’9″ S 153°35’6″ E). The tsunami station has been in event mode since the large quakes occurred in the area for several days now. This is triggered by the buoys’ anomalies of water column height above the sea floor. If you do a data search for 2010 March 20th to 2010 April 13th you get this- Over 100 meters or 328 feet less distance from buoy to sea floor in 24 days! That’s 13 feet per day since the quakes. As you will see from the waves on the line graph it matches the tide lines perfectly…

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Scientist Claims Sea Level Is Not Rising At All

More from the “no man-made climate change” gang at Fox News, whose Gene J. Koprowski counters reports that rising sea levels will soon drown Venice by profiling a scientist who says he’s got the data to prove that wrong:

In a new scientific paper, Nils-Axel Morner, former emeritus head of the paleogeophysics and geodynamics department at Stockholm University in Sweden, says that observational records from around the world — locations like the Maldives, Bangladesh, India, Tuvalu and Vanuatu — show the sea level isn’t rising at all.

In a NASA "what-if" animation, light-blue areas in southern Florida and Louisiana indicate regions that may be underwater should sea levels rise dramatically - which may not be as likely as scientists once thought. Photo: NASA

In a NASA "what-if" animation, light-blue areas in southern Florida and Louisiana indicate regions that may be underwater should sea levels rise dramatically – which may not be as likely as scientists once thought. Photo: NASA

Morner’s research, revealed Monday at the fourth International Conference on Climate Change, demonstrates that there is no “alarming sea level rise” across the globe, and it says a U.N.

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