Tag Archives | Secession

Billboard Proposes Texas-Louisiana-Missouri-Mississippi-Oklahoma Form Breakaway Nation

Is this tye-dyed billboard a vision of the future? The St. Louis Riverfront Times reports:

On a stretch of Interstate 44 between Lebanon and Springfield, the billboard asks readers to “consider a contiguous 5-state secession” and lists Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Mississippi as the lucky secessionist states.

Up until a week ago, the billboard had “MI” in place of “MS,” which was a problem because Michigan is not contiguous with the other four states.

An executive who was available for comment from DDI Media, the advertising company that owns the billboard, did not know who rented the space.

billboard

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‘Secession Is A Deeply American Principle’

So sayeth Ron Paul, via his blog. Should we expect the retiring Congressman to return to Texas and lead its secession movement?

Is all the recent talk of secession mere sour grapes over the election, or perhaps something deeper? Currently there are active petitions in support of secession for all 50 states, with Texas taking the lead in number of signatures. Texas has well over the number of signatures needed to generate a response from the administration, and while I wouldn’t hold my breath on Texas actually seceding, I believe these petitions raise a lot of worthwhile questions about the nature of our union.

Is it treasonous to want to secede from the United States? Many think the question of secession was settled by our Civil War. On the contrary; the principles of self-governance and voluntary association are at the core of our founding. Clearly Thomas Jefferson believed secession was proper, albeit as a last resort.

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Why Did The South Secede?

slaves in the familyAn interesting take from Edward Ball, author of Slaves in the Family, in the New York Times:

On Dec. 20, 1860, 169 men — politicians and people of property — met in the ballroom of St. Andrew’s Hall in Charleston, S.C. After hours of debate, they issued the 158-word “Ordinance of Secession,” which repealed the consent of South Carolina to the Constitution and declared the state to be an independent country. Four days later, the same group drafted a seven-page “Declaration of the Immediate Causes,” explaining why they had decided to split the Union.

The authors of these papers flattered themselves that they’d conjured up a second American Revolution. Instead, the Secession Convention was the beginning of the Civil War, which killed some 620,000 Americans; an equivalent war today would send home more than six million body bags.

The next five years will include an all-you-can-eat special of national remembrance.

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Meet the People of Vermont Who Want to Secede from the Union

Welcome To VermontChristopher Ketcham writes on Time.com:

The President on Wednesday may have reassured Americans that the state of the Union is “strong,” but, just the week before, a group of Vermont secessionists declared their intention to seek political power in a quest to get their state to quit the Union altogether.

On Jan. 15, in the state capital of Montpelier, nine candidates for statewide office gathered in a tiny room at the Capitol Plaza Hotel, to announce they wanted a divorce from the United States of America. “For the first time in over 150 years, secession and political independence from the U.S. will be front and center in a statewide New England political campaign,” said Thomas Naylor, 73, one of the leaders of the campaign.

A former Duke University economics professor, Naylor heads up the Second Vermont Republic, which he describes as “left-libertarian, anti-big government, anti-empire, antiwar, with small is beautiful as our guiding philosophy.” The group not only advocates the peaceful secession of Vermont but has minted its own silver “token” — valued at $25 — and, as part of a publishing venture with another secessionist group, runs a monthly newspaper called Vermont Commons, with a circulation of 10,000.

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