Tag Archives | Sharks

Fisherman Jumps in Ocean to Revive 300 lb. Bull Shark

This is an amazing video. Unfortunately, not every story like this has a happy ending: Many sharks caught and released die soon after, according to Juliet Eilperin’s book Demon Fish.

Via Huffington Post:

Regardless of how you feel about catch-and-release shark fishing, you have to respect this angler’s commitment to the latter part of the sport.

After reeling in a 300-pound bull shark, fishermen with Gasparilla Big Game, a charter service in Gasparilla, Fla., removed the hook from the shark’s mouth and released it back to the ocean. When it failed to swim away immediately, a courageous fisherman jumped into the water to help revive it. Meanwhile, a less-brave soul captured it all on video and uploaded it to YouTube.

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Megalodon: Myths and Misinformation

From Modern Mythology:

001-800px-Carcharocles_megalodon_10315

There is an 85 foot shark lurking in the depths off the Cape, and it’s Photoshopped as hell.

For many of those that caught the Sharknado meets Blair Witch atrocity of MegalodonWil Wheaton’s comments probably feel familiar – this very discussion occurred in the room as we watched with mild amusement and growing disgust – as it raises a larger question of where the burden of responsibility lies for stations such as Discovery or the History Channel, which has aired any number of dubious “documentaries.” (Whatever it was, It Was Aliens.)

Why bother getting upset about yet another stupid “found footage” fake documentary passed off as real? Isn’t that pretty much par for the course on cable these days?

And then I realized why I was (and am) so angry: I care about education. I care about science. I care about inspiring people to learn about the world and universe around us.

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Shark Had ‘Devil Horns’

"That shark has devil eyes!"

“That shark has devil eyes!”

Just in time for “Shark Week” comes this story of a devilish shark:

Via Discovery:

A new prehistoric shark, Diablodontus michaeledmundi aka “Devil-Tooth,” has been found in a chunk of Flagstaff, Ariz., limestone.

The shark must have been super tough, as its species survived the world’s biggest extinction event (the Permian-Triassic extinction).

PHOTOS: Could a Prehistoric, 60-Foot Shark Still Exist?

Devil Tooth not only had wickedly shark teeth, it also sported head spikes that gave it a devilish appearance. The spikes either evolved for defense or for sexual selection. In other words, the spikes must have turned on members of the opposite sex, similar to how horns of some animals today catch the eyes of potential mates.

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(Click through for a picture of the specimen.)… Read the rest

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‘Shark-Eat-Shark’ Picture Could Be Good Sign for Species Recovery

Catch of the day ... A blue shark attempting to eat a school shark.A photo posted on Reddit depicting a small shark on an angler’s line being attacked by a larger shark is being described as an encouraging sign according to one New Zealand scientist:

Via Sydney Morning Herald:

Department of Conservation shark expert Clinton Duffy, a marine scientist, said the shot actually captured a common event.

“Blue sharks often steal fish off people’s lines at this time of year and they also commonly eat other shark species.”

Duffy said the smaller shark was probably better known to New Zealanders as the white bit between the batter in their fish and chips – proving we’re not the only ones partial to its taste.

The school shark, a juvenile, was likely about 80cm long while its bigger enemy was about two metres. Both were common species in New Zealand waters, although the blue shark was becoming a rarity due to the practice of shark-finning, Duffy said.

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Shark Becomes Vegetarian (And Eats Lettuce Now) After A Near-Death Experience

LettuceNote to self, a near “death-by-fisherman” experience makes you hate meat. Stephen Messenger writes on TreeHugger:

Sharks have garnered a well-deserved reputation as the ocean’s most ferocious killers, capable of sniffing out a single drop of blood in the water from miles away — but for one nurse shark at an aquatic center in the UK, the taste of meat seems to have lost its luster.

Three years ago, a six-foot-long shark named Florence grabbed headlines by becoming the first of her kind to undergo a groundbreaking ‘out of water’ surgery to remove a rusty fish hook lodged in her gut. Although she made a remarkable recovery and was later put on exhibit at the Birmingham National Sea Life Center in England, Florence would eventually prove that being a good patient wasn’t her only distinction.

As it turns out, the Florence’s close brush with death-by-fisherman seems to have left a lasting impression on her — namely, that meaty treats mean trouble.

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