On June 30, 1908, something exploded over an isolated region of Siberia. Theories abound over what that something could have been, with explanations both prosaic (meteorite or comet) and preposterous (UFO crash,…

The Church of the Last Testament is equipped with solar energy, vegetable gardens, and trampolines, money is meaningless, and children sing pop songs and chase after adorable animals. As far as 21st-century Jesus reincarnations, this has to be one of the most convincing:

Deep in Siberia’s Taiga forest is Vissarion, a cult leader who looks like Jesus and claims to be the voice of God. He’s known as “the Teacher” to his 4,000 followers…who [possess an] unflinching belief in UFOs and the Earth’s imminent demise.

siberia-ufo_2174392bAfter several days, Russian scientists are at a loss as to what this structure could be. The Telegraph reports:

The U-shaped object, resembling a silvery dome, is currently under inspection by Russian experts, after being covertly removed under cover of night from the possession of villagers who found it. After discovering the device on Sunday, locals from the village of Otradnesnky had managed to drag the “UFO fragment” from the thick forest where it had fallen.

The device has not [been] confirmed as of yet. However, the object does not come from a rocket or missile or is in any way associated with terrestrial space technology, it has been announced. Speculation that it had come from a bungled Kazakhstan rocket or satellite launch was denied.

Experts have also examined the object to determine whether it poses a hazard [but] “found no radiation.” Part of the fragment is made of ultra-strong titanium…

WampaKevin Makice writes on Wired:

As geeks, we are encouraged to suspend our disbelief while simultaneously challenging everything we see and hear. In the words of Agent Mulder, we want to believe, but our geek roots are firmly planted in the scientific method.

That tension is possibly being resolved on one front. The Russians are establishing a scientific institute on the study of yetis, hairy ape-like creatures rumored to inhabit the Himalayas.

Officials in coal-mining region of Kemerovo Oblast announced plans today to open a Yeti Institute at the Kemerovo State University, a 38-year-old higher education entity in western Siberia. KSU boasts 31,000 students and is best known for reviving regional languages, like Shor. Yeti researcher Igor Burtsev reportedly claimed that 30 Russian scientists are currently studying yetis, or Abominable Snowmen, and the Institute could allow them to better collaborate.