Tag Archives | Situationism

Los Angeles Street Artist Trolls Entire City with Fake Plaques

Via the LA Times:

Los Angeles street artist “Wild Life” transformed a number of the city’s banal eyesores into works of “art”:

Eight random areas of downtown L.A. have been marked with what appear to be official city plaques, offering elaborate background information about the dumpsters, city blocks, and signposts to which they are affixed, reports The Lost Angeles Times. The plaques are even equipped with faux-signatures from Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch, and allude to A-list artists and directors like Yoko Ono, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Werner Herzog as alleged designers of the city’s downtown spots.

But the mysterious art project, which goes by the name of “Art Appears,” is really just a giant hoax. We hate to break it to you, but the dumpster on Traction Avenue was not designed by Andy Warhol. The so-called “Thirsty Palms” exhibit on 2nd Street? Not by Chris Burden, says Curbed LA.

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Art, Terrorism and the Negative Sublime

Picture: DOD (PD)

Arnold Berleant writes at Contemporary Aesthetics:

1. Terrorism and Aesthetics

It has become increasingly clear that the arts, and the aesthetic, more generally, occupy no hallowed ground but live on the everyday earth of our lives. Recognition is growing that the aesthetic is a pervasive dimension of the objects and activities of daily life. Perceptual experiences that possess the characteristics of aesthetic appreciation are marked by an intense, focused sensibility we enjoy for its intrinsic perceptual satisfaction. We typically have such experiences with works of art and with nature, but they are equally possible in other occasions and with other kinds of objects. Such experiences engage us in an intensely sensory field in which we participate wholly and without reservation, as we customarily do with works of art. The objects and occasions, however, may be ordinary ones, such as eating, hanging laundry, engaging in social relations, or operating a perfectly functioning automobile or other mechanism.

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Against Tourism: The Art Of Traveling

Running of the bulls PamplonaDante’s Inferno provides us with what is perhaps the most apt picture of tourism to date. More specifically, it is in the first layer of Hell, Limbo, that Dante depicts the circumstances that contextualize tourism and the individual who undertakes it, i.e. the tourist.

Like the unbaptized and virtuous Pagans whose torture is the inability to imagine something greater than their rational minds can conceive, the tourist never ventures beyond the predetermined image of the places they visit. The tourist deals only in images, whether it is the image of the Grand Canyon that was promised to him by the travel agent, or the image he must make of it (by snapping a picture) in order for it to become real. The tourist cannot know the mystery or grandeur of the Grand Canyon as it stretches across the horizon, she can only seen it in comparison to the image she was promised.… Read the rest

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