Tag Archives | social engineering

Leonard Cohen’s Secret Life, MKUltra, & Cultural Engineering


You don’t know me from the wind
you never will, you never did
I’m the little jew
who wrote the Bible

In a recent 4-part, 5-hour podcast conversation with the author Ann Diamond, Diamond talks about the art scene in Montreal in the 1960s and 70s and how closely tied it appears to have been to McGill University, the Allan Memorial Institue, and the MKUltra program which Dr. Ewen Cameron was implementing there, involving possibly tens of thousands of children and adults. Diamond first met Cohen in 1979 and they had an intermittent affair for several years. Her testimony suggests that Leonard Cohen (like Diamond herself) was one of the many MKUltra subjects (though whether voluntary or not is unclear, most weren’t). Others whom Diamond names are filmmaker Allan Moyle (Pump Up the Volume), actor Stephen Lack (Scanners), and Oscar-nominated film artists Arthur Lipsett and Ryan Larkin.… Read the rest

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History of the British Accent

In 1834, the British Poor Laws were created to regulate the lives of the poor. The rich upper-classes thought they could manage society in such a way as to eradicate poverty. But to do so they would have to establish themselves as “the elite.” They had to separate themselves from the poor by giving themselves a separate dialect of the english language from the rest of society. The modern day result of that is astonishing.

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An Open Letter to TED

arrangementsKen Jordan, Publisher & Editorial Director, Evolver/Reality Sandwich, has written an open letter to TED’s Chris Anderson in an attempt to get the TED organization to stop squirming around for a minute and talk about the real issues at stake in their decision to cordon off large swaths of scientific inquiry:

“TED’s prominence has made it, perhaps inadvertently, into an forum that validates worthy intellectual progress. If a good idea gets momentum, it will most likely end up, one way or another, presented by TED or one of the TEDx offshoots.

That’s why the censure of the TEDx talks by Graham Hancock and Rupert Sheldrake is so dismaying. As you must know, to many of us the reasons behind their removal from the TED YouTube site are just not clear. On behalf of the Evolver community, I’d like to extend an invitation to you to help us understand the reasoning that led to TED’s actions, because we suspect that behind your decision is an uninformed prejudice against groundbreaking research in a critical area of study, the possibility that consciousness extends beyond the brain.”

The issue here is not one of censorship, it’s one of social engineering.… Read the rest

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Using Smart Gadgets As Tools Of Social Control

How devices will soon begin pressuring us to “fix” our behavior. Via the Wall Street Journal, Evgeny Morozov writes:

Many smart technologies are heading in a disturbing direction. A number of thinkers in Silicon Valley see these technologies as a way not just to give consumers new products that they want but to push them to behave better. The central idea is clear: social engineering disguised as product engineering.

Last week in Singapore, Google Chief Financial Officer Patrick Pichette restated Google’s notion that the world is a “broken” place whose problems, from traffic jams to inconvenient shopping experiences to excessive energy use, can be solved by technology. The futurist and game designer Jane McGonigal, a favorite of the TED crowd, also likes to talk about how “reality is broken” but can be fixed by making the real world more like a videogame, with points for doing good.

Insurance companies already offer significant discounts to drivers who agree to install smart sensors in order to monitor their driving habits.

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