Tag Archives | Social Media

The TSA Wants To Read Your Facebook Posts And Check Out Your Purchases Before It Will Approve You For PreCheck

Sam Ley (CC BY-NC-SA-2.0)

Sam Ley (CC BY-NC-SA-2.0)

Tim Cushing writes at Techdirt:

The TSA is disappointed that so few Americans have opted out of its bottle-tossing, package-groping screenings by signing up for its PreCheck program. For a few years now, the TSA has been selling travelers’ civil liberties back to them, most recently for $85 a head, but it’s now making a serious push to increase participation. The TSA can’t do it alone, so it’s accepting bids on its PreCheck expansion proposal. (h/t to Amy Alkon)

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is seeking vendors for TSA Pre√® Application Expansion initiative to develop, deliver, and deploy private sector application capabilities expanding the public’s enrollment opportunities for TSA Pre✓® through an Other Transactional Agreement (OTA) awarded by TSA. The Government plans to award an OTA to multiple vendors. The Government will evaluate the proposed ready-to-market solutions’ application capabilities against this TSA Pre√® Expansion Initiative Solicitation and Statement of Work.

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“You Can’t Stop the Signal” — An Analysis of Social Media Activism

Essam Sharaf  (CC BY-SA 3.0) via Wikimedia Commons.

Essam Sharaf (CC BY-SA 3.0) via Wikimedia Commons.

Via World Policy Blog

Welcome back to the World Policy “Best of” list. Today we pull back the curtain on the Egyptian revolution and reveal its somewhat dark underbelly. Political activist Mahmoud Salem, who tweets under the name “sandmonkey,” shares how the introduction of social media into Egyptian culture sparked the Egyptian revolution where he played a seminal social media role. At the same time, these same tools now jeopardize the creation of any political infrastructure capable of governing effectively. 

By Mahmoud Salem

CAIRO, Egypt—As a child of the 1980s, I grew up watching science fiction television shows and movies—all set in the “not-so-distant future.” Holographic communication, teleportation, and flying cars were central tenets of that universe. And while I marveled at the prospect of these technologies, I was most fascinated by the “magical technological device”—that could be used to complete any task, from basic communication to dissemination of news to national security.

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The reaction to the “Instagram Rapture” shows how narcissistic the service really is

Instagram-Logo

via Pando Daily:

Instagram recently decided to permanently delete many of the spam accounts it’s discovered on its service. The move was meant to help the network remain “authentic” because “it’s a place where real people share real moments,” Instagram said at the time. But apparently some of the users affected by this decision aren’t happy about its impact.

Business Insider reports “thousands of people” have reached out to Instagram asking it to restore their old follower counts in the wake of what it calls the “Instagram Rapture.” This despite Instagram’s warning that follower counts would change as the result of its New Year’s cleaning — and the fact that those followers were little more than spam bots.

This is in keeping with what some have suspected about Instagram for a while. For example, I argued last year that the addition of video features to the service wasn’t about communication, like co-founder Kevin Systrom said, but about its users’ narcissism:

Instagram is still very much about presentation.

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Tweets from the afterlife: social networking with the dead

The possibility of a posthumous digital social life seriously challenges our notions of death. Shimal Ahmed (Fulhi), CC BY-SA

The possibility of a posthumous digital social life seriously challenges our notions of death. Shimal Ahmed (Fulhi), CC BY-SA

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
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By Bjorn Nansen, University of Melbourne; James Meese, University of Melbourne; Martin Gibbs, University of Melbourne; Michael Arnold, University of Melbourne, and Tamara Kohn, University of Melbourne

Media technologies have operated as both a means of communicating news of a death and memorialising the deceased for a significant period of time, moving from traditional epitaphs, eulogies, wakes and inscription in stone to centuries-old obituaries printed and circulated in newspapers. So where are we now?

Digital commemoration emerged as the internet became readily accessible and an integral part of people’s communicative practices. Initially, during the 90s, it took the form of memorial websites hosted by the families and friends of the deceased.… Read the rest

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Dr. Oz asked Twitter for health questions

Dr. Oz's Twitter picture.

Dr. Oz’s Twitter picture.

Dr. Oz opened up a can of worms on Twitter yesterday. He asked the Twitter community for health questions and some of the responses are great. Don’t you love it when social media gimmicks backfire?

The Questions:

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Facebook Boosts News Feeds of Top 100 Media Outlets in Secret Political Experiment

Facebooklogo

via Activist Post:

What is the point of a social network that doesn’t share your content with friends and followers? Oh, yeah, for profit, government spying, emotional experiments and now, political manipulation.

Since they went public, Facebook has been playing with their algorithms to prevent “viral” content from occurring naturally in favor of charging users to show content to their followers. This profit-seeking strategy destroyed the only thing that made Facebook useful. Now it seems to serve as little more than an oversized telephone or IM app. But underneath, in the shadows, it’s still so much more than that.

Mother Jones reports that Facebook has been conducting stealthy political experiments on users, including tweaking the news feeds of almost 2 million users to boost articles shared from the top 100 media outfits. The purpose was to test voter turnout in the 2012 election.

As Huffington Post summarizes:

Facebook quietly tweaked the news feeds of 1.9 million users before the 2012 election so they would see more “hard news” shared by friends.

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Watching Friends Recover From Addiction on Facebook

By Mr. Theklan via Flickr (CC by-sa 2.0)

By Mr. Theklan via Flickr (CC by-sa 2.0)

via The Atlantic:

Through likes and comments, I’ve watched my hometown of Perry, Ohio, disappear into and come back from heroin addiction.

The U.S. is facing a massive heroin epidemic, and nowhere is it more evident than in Ohio, where fatal drug overdoses surpassed car crashes as the leading cause of accidental death in 2007, and increased by 60 percent from 2011 to 2012. Addicts in rehabilitation say heroin is the easiest drug to find. State legislators have called for Republican Governor John Kasich to declare the prevalence of heroin a public-health emergency, and in May he agreed to an Obamacare Medicaid expansion largely because the state badly needed the federal help in funding treatment for heroin addiction.

Perry, Ohio, is a microcosm of the epidemic, which is now infiltrating upper-middle-class suburbs. Thirty minutes east of Cleveland, the town of 1,500 has a median annual income $31,000 higher than that of Ohio overall, but it also lacks opportunities for young adults to start their lives.

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Investors in anti-Facebook startup have no idea how it will make money

15965424-mmmain

via Ars Technica:

Ello, the notably stripped-down, ad-free social network, announced Thursday that it has taken $5.5 million in venture capital and re-incorporated as a “Public Benefit Corporation.”

The company’s founders and investors also published a one-page document in which they declared:

  1. Ello must never make money from selling ads
  2. Ello must never make money from selling user data
  3. In the event that Ello is ever sold, the new owners would also have to comply by these terms

So how is Ello going to make money? Even its investors don’t know.

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Politics of Social Media: Where You’re Likely to Find Conservatives and Liberals

via Mediaite:

Politically inactive conservatives generally populate Pinterest, while politically inactive liberals tend to use Instagram. Them’s the facts, according to new data revealed by audience measurement service Quantcast this month.

As the helpful chart below demonstrates, Facebook is the most politically balanced platform (likely because it has so many users), while the majority of social media “skew Democrat and [politically] inactive”:

Comparing-Social-Platforms1

A few other noticeable details:

1) Pinterest is the most conservative social media outlet, thus confirming existing stereotypes about the site being used by older, wealthy women from the midwest states.

2) Disqus is the most politically active social media outlet. Anyone surprised? It also skews conservative, which explains a lot. (But that’s also somewhat surprising, as we’ve noticed at Mediaite that articles about conservatives doing silly things tend to have lots of liberal comments, and vice versa.)

3) Twitter apparently leans the furthest left among all social media.

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ELLO: Could This Be The End of Facebook?

Screen Shot 2014-09-24 at 9.56.39 PMMany moons ago, I discovered a wonderful social network known as myspace.com. It was an exciting way to meet new people and find those who had likeminded interests. It was also a great way to cruise for members of the opposite sex and flirt. As time progressed, people seemed to become annoyed with the juvenile aspects of Myspace culture and the pervasive tendency to blast through and ‘friend collect’, while worshipping internet celebs like ‘Forbidden’ and ‘Tila Tequila’. When Facebook launched, it was an exclusive network for college students. But soon it became the unstoppable juggernaut that we know today. What seemed to be the nail in Myspace’s coffin was the involvement of big corporate interest which essentially stripped Myspace of all its coolness. Forbidden and Tila became old news and we breathed a collective sigh of relief.

Now Facebook has become a bit like Myspace. It is riddled with corporate grossness and metrics that monitor and track us NSA style.… Read the rest

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