Tag Archives | Squid

Can Squid Make You Invisible?

Iwami squid drying DSC01868.jpg

Photo: David Monniaux (CC)

Can squid make people invisible? Well, sort of if you’re worried about infrared detection, per CNN:

One of the world’s oldest organism groups, cephalopods, like squid, octopus and cuttlefish, have survived in Earth’s oceans for millions of years.

They key to their survival: mastering the art of camouflage.

Now, scientists say, these ancient invertebrates may hold the key to developing a combat technology that will allow soldiers to avoid infrared detection.

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine say they have discovered a way to use proteins in the cells of pencil squid to develop “invisibility stickers” that can be worn by ground troops.

“Soldiers wear uniforms with the familiar green and brown camouflage patterns to blend into foliage during the day, but under low light and at night, they’re still vulnerable to infrared detection,” said Alon Gorodetsky, assistant professor of chemical engineering and material sciences.

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Giant Octopuses: The Underrated Cephalopods of the Sea

"Giant Pacific Octopus Being Playful" by Michael Bentley via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

“Giant Pacific Octopus Being Playful” by Michael Bentley via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

via Mysterious Universe:

When people think of giant tentacled beasts of the sea, surely the first creature to spring to mind is the giant squid or colossal squid. These are the rock stars of oversized cephalopods, and hog all the spotlight from their kin, the octopuses. It is often overlooked that there are very large octopuses lurking in the depths of our oceans, and if numerous reports from around the world are anything to go by, some of them are just as large and frightening as any giant squid.

The currently largest known octopus is the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini), which inhabits the waters of the coastal North Pacific along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, northern Japan and Korea, and are found at depths of up to 2,000 m (6,600 ft). The giant Pacific octopus is truly enormous, and particularly large specimens can reach weights of up to 50 kg (110 lb) and have a radial arm span of a whopping 6 m (20 ft).

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Ocean Noise Pollution Blowing Holes in Squids’ Heads

From Discovery News:

Thousands of Humboldt squid died off the coast of Oregon in 2004 and hundreds again in 2008. The culprit was originally considered a shift in deep-sea currents, but a new study pinpoints the physical trauma noise pollution can inflict on cephalopods and raises new concerns over the incidents of squid strandings. Dolphins and whales and other marine mammals aren’t the only sea life vulnerable to noise pollution from human activities.


Earlier indications that squid might be susceptible to noise occurred in 2001 and again in 2003, when giant squid washed up along the shore of Asturias, Spain. After struggling to identify the reason, biologists eventually concluded that the deaths were most likely related to the presence of vessels using seismic air guns for geophysical prospecting of the seabed.

A new study, published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, has found that even low intensity noise can leave cephalopods damaged and likely to wash ashore.

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