Subculture

LARPing, or live-action roleplaying, is a game in which people create characters and act out storylines within fictional worlds, in real time, in costume. Vice goes LARPing to meet Jon Gallagher, a…








algoraveCan all digitally-created music really just be thought of as humans manipulating algorithms? If so, why not get to the heart of things? A burgeoning, extremely nerdy subculture called algorave revolves around generating, altering, and combining electronic sound loops via on-the-spot coding, using languages such as SuperCollider, with the coding projected on a large screen. Could this be the worst new form of music, or the most honest? Wikipedia writes:

An algorave is an event where people dance to music generated from algorithms, often using live coding techniques. Algoraves can include a range of styles, including a complex form of minimal techno, and has been described as a meeting point of hacker philosophy, geek culture, and clubbing.

The first self-proclaimed “algorave” was held as a warmup concert for the SuperCollider Symposium 2012. The first North American algorave took place in Hamilton, Ontario during the artcrawl of 9 August 2013.



Writer Danny Smith shares this interview he conducted with an “otherkin”. I couldn’t help but to notice that the ‘kin states that he worships Corellon, God of the Elves – a deity…


With punk as the theme of this year’s Metropolitan Museum Costume Institute benefit, Nitsuh Abebe asks “If a movement known for rage, rebellion, and adolescent id becomes the focus of a high-fashion…







In 1967, the BBC program Wicker’s World travelled to San Francisco to investigate the philosophy and lifestyle of what they dubbed “the Love Generation”, who were “cracking the smooth silhouette of American materialism”. Teen runaways, doing LSD in the woods, and confrontations with the square-minded are included in this vision of a time and place that resonates today:


I thought it would be interesting to continue the discussion from my previous post on “Steampunk and Anarchism” (found here). This next article by Magpie Killjoy explores the intersection of radical politics…


ADDI wrote my first comic, Club Zero-G, as a monthly insert to the rave culture magazine BPM. When the magazine couldn’t afford to continue the series, disinformation came to my rescue, giving me the pages I needed to tell the whole story in a single volume graphic novel, drawn by Steph Dumais. The story was about kids who shared the same dreamspace at night – a giant rave that none of them remember the next day in waking consciousness, except one boy.

That was more than a decade ago, but on the release of my latest graphic novel, A.D.D., I’m coming to realize that I am telling a similar story – this time about a gamer who sees things in the games that others don’t. He’s part of a group of kids raised from birth, or maybe even earlier, to test various forms of media. If they develop special abilities like our hero’s, it is labeled as resistance and steps are taken to neutralize it.

A.D.D. stands for Adolescent Demo Division, but it’s also an obvious reference to the sensory disorder plaguing so many kids today. And while it’s still considered controversial or even dangerous to suggest, I’m hoping we start to consider the role that our “attention economy” may have in the massive increase of diagnoses.

In this short scene, we get a glimpse of our hero, Lionel, and his love…


Reuters reports on yet another uniquely American subculture: When Patty Tegeler looks out the window of her home overlooking the Appalachian Mountains in southwestern Virginia, she sees trouble on the horizon. “In…



Are vampire portrayals in popular media blurring driving today’s youth over the edge? Personally, I’ll take teen vampirism over “raving”, “krumping”, or “the ska revival”. The Houston Chronicle writes: A man claiming…




National Geographic’s Taboo looks at phenomenon of people who choose to live their lives as “adult babies”. Is it a metaphor for the “nanny state” we live in? A retreat from the pressures of modern life? Or just the most disturbing subculture to ever emerge in history? (Scandinavian black metal can’t compete with adult infantilism.) Warning: this cannot be unseen.