Tag Archives | Suicide

Aokigahara Forest, The Suicide Woods Of Japan

AokigaharaInformational signs scattered throughout warn passersby, “Your life is precious”. Tofugu on one of the spookiest spots in Japan:

Located at the base of Mt. Fuji, Aokigahara is perhaps the most infamous forest in Japan. Also known as the Sea of Trees, Suicide Forest, and Japan’s Demon Forest, Aokigahara has been home to over 500 confirmed suicides since the 1950s.

Wataru Tsurumui’s controversial 1993 bestseller The Complete Suicide Manual is a book that describes various modes of suicide and even recommends Aokigahara as the perfect place to die. Undoubtedly, the most common method of suicide in the forest is hanging.

Japanese spiritualists believe that the suicides committed in the forest have permeated Aokigahara’s soil and trees, generating paranormal activity and preventing many who enter from escaping the gnarled depths of the forest.

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Documentary Looks Inside The Heaven’s Gate Cult

Quite possibly the craziest cult ever, Heaven’s Gate was founded by Marshall Applewhite and Bonnie Nettles. Heaven’s Gate members believed that the planet Earth was about to be recycled (wiped clean, renewed, refurbished and rejuvenated), and that the only chance to survive was to leave it immediately. While the group was formally against suicide, they defined “suicide” in their own context to mean “to turn against the Next Level when it is being offered,” and believed that their “human” bodies were only vessels meant to help them on their journey. Inconversation, when referring to a person or a person’s body, they routinely used the word “vehicle”.

This documentary investigates an incident in 1997, where thirty-nine members of the San Diego-based cult “Heaven’s Gate” committed mass suicide. They intended to reach an alien spacecraft which they believed to be following Comet Hale-Bopp, which was at that time brightly visible in the nighttime sky.

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What It Feels Like to Be Suicidal

398px-Hofmann_Lehrbuch_suicide_stabbingInteresting piece on suicidal ideation in Scientific American.

Scientific American:

In considering people’s motivations for killing themselves, it is essential to recognize that most suicides are driven by a flash flood of strong emotions, not rational, philosophical thoughts in which the pros and cons are evaluated critically. And, as I mentioned in last week’s column on the evolutionary biology of suicide, from a psychological science perspective, I don’t think any scholar ever captured the suicidal mind better than Florida State University psychologist Roy Baumeister in his 1990 Psychological Review article , “Suicide as Escape from the Self.” To reiterate, I see Baumeister’s cognitive rubric as the engine of emotions driving deCatanzaro’s biologically adaptive suicidal decision-making. There are certainly more recent theoretical models of suicide than Baumeister’s, but none in my opinion are an improvement. The author gives us a uniquely detailed glimpse into the intolerable and relentlessly egocentric tunnel vision that is experienced by a genuinely suicidal person.

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Woman Blames David Icke for Son’s Bizarre Death

david-icke-books-and-stories-and-written-worksI’m not the biggest fan of David icke, but I can’t get behind blaming him for something like this. It’s a little close to the “Satanic Panic” of the eighties, when bands like Judas Priest and games like Dungeons & Dragons were blamed for suicides and murders. Sad story, though.

Via the Mirror:

A small, tearful figure huddled in her stark home in the small Cornish village of Rescorla, Susan explains how her elder son Luke “worshipped” Icke and was so keen to prove his theories on Near Death Experiences, he decided to test them, with fatal consequences.

On May 17 he walked alone to a flooded clay pit and submerged himself in the icy water in an attempt to induce hypothermia.

His aim, Susan believes, was to experience “astral projection”, when con­scious­ness is said to leave the body and lead to a state of heightened spirituality.

Luke, 27, was wearing a life-jacket and goggles, signs that Susan insists mean he did not intend to die.

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DisinfoCast: 81: Russ Kick – “Death Poems”

9781938875045

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Legendary editor Russ Kick returns to the DisinfoCast to discuss his new collection Death Poems, an anthology of verse both modern and classic dedicated to all aspects of death: Funerals, the death penalty, serial killings, the Underworld and more. Funny, sad, atheistic, spiritual, mythic, wise and morbid, this is the perfect collection for anyone who needs a little “memento mori”.

Additional subjects discussed: Near-death experiences, morbid thoughts, the afterlife or lack thereof, “the 357 test”, the role of art, post-modernism and more.

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Police: Spy Probably Zipped and Padlocked Himself Into the Duffel Bag His Body Was Found In

Picture: PD

Picture: PD

Nothing to see here. Move along, move along.

Via Newser

The MI6 spy whose naked body was found inside a zipped, padlocked gym bag probably died … by accident, UK police have decided. The coroner said last year Gareth Williams was probably killed by someone else in a criminal act, but now the Metropolitan Police have completed an evidence review and say it’s “more probable” no one else was in his apartment when he died in his bathroom in 2010, the BBC reports. The deputy assistant commissioner said today it’s “theoretically possible” Williams locked himself into the bag.

Keep reading.

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Should Lithium Be Added To Drinking Water To Prevent Suicides?

lithiumMother Nature Network has the latest news on the previously discussed sort-of-logical-yet-profoundly-horrifying concept:

A study carried out in June of 2011 demonstrated that drinking water contaminated with lithium could actually lower suicide rates. So should lithium be added as a supplement to the water supply, as is done with fluoride?

In the study, 6,460 samples of drinking water were tested across 99 districts in Austria. Districts with higher levels of lithium tended to report lower suicide rates. In some areas lithium occurs naturally in the water supply, likely leached out of rocks and stones.

The results weren’t terribly shocking, as lithium has been used for decades to treat depression. This was the first time its effect was measured based on trace amounts within drinking water, however.

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Sexting, Shame and Suicide

Image: Carrie

Image: Carrie

This is a true story about a young lady who was violated, publicly shamed, and eventually committed suicide. A few lessons can be gleaned about who is chosen to be associated with, the vulnerability acquired while consuming chemicals, and the shadow personalties which are prone to be  evoked during a collective inebriation. This may also be a partial answer to a question posed in the recent disinfo post titled American Ephebiphobia.

via Rolling Stone

On the last day of her life, Audrie Pott walked through a crucible of teenage torment. A curvaceous sophomore at Saratoga High School, dressed in the cool-girl’s uniform of a low-cut top and supershort skirt, she looked the same as always, but inside she was quivering with humiliation. In the week since school had started, girls had been giving her looks, and guys had congregated around phones, smirking. On Facebook, messages were pinging into her inbox, each one delivering another gut punch: “shit went down ahah jk i bet u already got enough ppl talking about it so ill keep it to myself haha.

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Are Military Suicides Doing It For The Money?

United_States_Army_Suicide_Prevention_PosterIt has been well documented that US military servicemen and women have been committing suicide at alarming rates, but now it appears that their motivation may not be entirely due to the terrible things they’ve seen and done: for some of them, it’s for the money. Alan Zarembo reports for the LA Times:

Army Spc. James Christian Paquette walked into the benefits office at Ft. Wainwright, Alaska, with a question: Did his military life insurance policy pay in cases of suicide? He was assured that it did.

Less than two weeks later, he shot and killed himself — and his family collected $400,000.

His widow struggles with the question of whether he would have proceeded with his plan if suicide had not been covered. “He just wanted to know we would be provided for,” Jami Calahan said. “It may have been a weight taken away.”

The role of life insurance has not been closely examined in the quest to understand why 352 active-duty service members took their own lives last year — more than double the number a decade earlier.

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Editor’s Note: Suicide

NOPE. NOT IN THE LEAST, BROTHER.

NOPE. NOT IN THE LEAST, BROTHER.

We’ve had several posts recently that have examined the topic of suicide. It’s a very complicated issue, and a difficult one to parse out in an environment where anonymity can sometimes bring out the very worst (and sometimes best, I admit) in people. Thankfully, the Disinfo crowd is a pretty civil one.

If you’ve followed my podcast (and writing) here, then you know that I’ve always striven to be honest with you, especially when it comes to my own personal issues. I have a very long family history of suicides, and I myself have dealt with depression and anxiety my entire life.  I talk about those things because I feel like they’re nothing to be ashamed of, and by speaking up then there’s a chance that someone else might not feel like they’re alone in dealing with this stuff.

If I had not resisted those self-destructive impulses (Let’s jump off the parking garage… Let’s drive the car into a telephone pole… Let’s eat a bullet… ) and the negativity (You’re doomed… You’ll never fit in… You’re an embarrassment… ) and spoken up, I would have missed out on a ton of stuff, and I don’t even mean the usual “sunshine and bunnies” things.… Read the rest

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